Crossfire?


#1

what does it mean to crossfire ive heard alot of people say that in reference with sidearm :?:


#2

This is a great question for Zita.


#3

Take a look at that video. That is the crossfire.


#4

Yea this is going to be Zita’s money subject. A very short explanation would be that it is when a sidearm pitcher steps more closed then usual so when he pitches around his leg, he gets a much more drastic angle as the ball moves in. The link above is nice. I personally prefere watching Coleman from LSU, I believe his delivery is fairly effective. To look it up just look up Coleman LSU on youtube.


#5

basically its throwing across your body in an exagerated maner. crossfire probably came from someone playing too much role games as this is a ridiculous name.


#6

Since so many people have been asking about the crossfire, I will explain it in depth.
The crossfire is a move that works only with the sidearm delivery. It’s been around for a long time; the first I heard of it was when Ewell Blackwell was pitching first for the Cincinnati Reds and later on the N.Y. Yankees. I was a natural sidearmer, and I picked up on that delivery at about 14 and fell in love with it; I used it effectively for nearly two decades.
Here’s how it works. Say you’re a righthander. You go into the windup—or the stretch, depending on the presence or absence of baserunners— and then you step toward third base and deliver the pitch from that angle. To the batter it looks as if it were coming at him from third base, or even from behind the pitcher’s back, and few things are more discombooberating than to see the pitch coming from that angle only to clip the corner for a strike. This move will work with any pitch. Of course, if you’re a southpaw you’ll go by way of first base; I was watching a game on TV the other evening and I saw a southpaw sidearmer using that delivery.
I’ve seen a lot of pitchers use it through the years. Spud Chandler, one of the great Yankee pitchers(and a sidearmer), used it with telling effect. Allie Reynolds used it quite a bit. More recently, Jeff Nelson (remember him?). There have been many others. For a sidearm pitcher this is one of the most effective moves imaginable, and it’s not difficult to pick up. And here’s a little anecdote from my own experience: one day my pitching coach was helping me with the circle change, and he said to me “I know you’re going to crossfire it. You use that move with everything you throw.” :slight_smile: I couldn’t argue with him there, because I was using it roughly half the time.
And there you have it. The crossfire. 8)


#7

Ye I tried it like you said Zita and its actually alot easier then I thought and it my brother said it looks ridicules while hes standing at the plate. If I can get my slider really working I am going to crossfire for sure:P


#8

From experience I can say a crossfire slider is one of the dirtiest pitches ever and if you can do it successfully then I wil hate you without knowing you. haha :lol:


#9

I know. That’s why I used it. And that’s why everybody in the league in which I pitched was calling me the “Exterminator”, because I was just killing them with it. It’s a beautiful—and deadly—combination, that crossfire slider. :slight_smile: :baseballpitcher:


#10

Nelson was really good … threw very hard (upper 90s) and had a unique delivery. I used to love to watch him come in and set up Mariano Rivera.


#11

And on occasion Nelson would stay in there and close the game if he had to. I often wished he could be cloned—he was a terrific pitcher.