Crossfire

I am really hoping for feedback from Zita, since the threw with crossfire mechanics, but anybody else please chip in. Can You still use the cross fire if you throw a 3/4 to low 3/4 arm slot, I do and would be interested in trying it (once my arm problems are gone). I am trying to relearn my delivery since I started out with pitching and bought a book, which tried to make me into a “cookie cutter” pitcher mechanically wise. I have tried going more closed before and found it more natural. so please feedback on if it would be okay to use crossfire as a 3/4 -low 3/4 arm slot

Good evening, Priceless.
You could try it with the low 3/4 delivery, but it wouldn’t work as well as it would with the sidearm—and it certainly won’t work with any other arm angle. Better to stay with the full sidearm motion. And what’s this about a book that tries to make a cookie-cutter pitcher out of you? Tsk, tsk. :slight_smile: 8)

[quote=“Zita Carno”]Good evening, Priceless.
You could try it with the low 3/4 delivery, but it wouldn’t work as well as it would with the sidearm—and it certainly won’t work with any other arm angle. Better to stay with the full sidearm motion. And what’s this about a book that tries to make a cookie-cutter pitcher out of you? Tsk, tsk. :slight_smile: 8)[/quote]

thanks zita, Yeah the books called “Louisville slugger complete book of pitching” basically wants you to become greg maddux. Well I’m not greg maddux. It also has no idea about momentum pitching.

Nobody ever said you had to become Greg Maddux—or Mark Buehrle, or any other particular pitcher. The important thing is for you to find your own style and your own mechanics. As for “momentum pitching”—I never even heard of it. How do you pitch a momemtum? :lol:
I was a 5’4" shrimp, 125 pounds, and I wasn’t much in the way of speed, so I threw a lot of snake-jazz. I got my momentum from something I had picked up from watching how the Yankees’ Big Three got the power behind their pitches—they all drove off the lower half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous motion, and not only did they get their power from this move but also it took a lot of pressure off the arm and the shoulder (how NOT to get a sore arm). I used the full windup, the old-fashioned kind—if you’ve ever seen Paul Byrd in action, that was what he did—pitched from the stretch with runners on, of course—and that was how I did it. An odd, and welcome, side-effect was that I picked up speed in the process and ended up with an 81-MPH fast ball!
So, don’t worry about it. Find your own good mechanics and make the most of them, and add the crossfire to your repertoire—you could, if you wanted to, even throw a knuckleball that way! :slight_smile: 8)

By momentum, I mean getting your body started towards plate as your leg lifts. Before I wouldn’t start until my leg came down. I don’t do that now.

Well, I used a slide-step all the time, but what that did was to add some speed to my delivery. Not to mention—that if there happened to be a runner on base he couldn’t get a good jump on me, because if he took one step too many I could pick him off. Anyhoo, have fun with the crossfire. 8)