Cross-Training Sports in Offseason


#1

Hey everybody, I started playing Badminton this winter in high school just for fun. I feel that it is a great sport regarding footwork (quickness) and arm strenght when swinging the raquet. Do you guys feel that it would be benifical. Also is there any other sports/activitys that take place in the winter that would be good for baseball crosstraining.

Thanks and have a happy holidays.


#2

if you’re serious about baseball, you should spend the offseason training for it.


#3

I know this is not specific to your actual question, but may I suggest something that might not be healthy for you - like weird sports.

I had brothers on one club that brought a collection of boomerangs to the field - we were given permission to use a municipal soccer field for some early season tossing and I thought it would be a good idea. I had no idea that boomerangs would be the center of our day.

Myself and another coach left the group and walked over to an field house to check in and sign some waiver papers. We started talking to the people in the house when one of the players came running over and wanted to know if we brought a first aid kit - nothing serious he said, it’s just that his brother got dinged by two of the boomerangs!

How in blazes did get hit twice? Was he stupid enough to get knuckled once, then stand up and walk into the same thing a second time!??

It seemed that these bright-lights brought five boomerangs to the field and let them all fly at once … then they lost track of exactly where those things were. Needless to say, everyone thought it was kind of neat till they realized that these things gotta start landing somewhere!

To make a long story short - the guy required about dozen stitches to the back of his head. But, he did have a great season that year. In fact, long after the stitches came out … the nickname boomerang stuck with the guy for years.

Coach B.


#4

[quote=“Coach Baker”]I know this is not specific to your actual question, but may I suggest something that might not be healthy for you - like weird sports.

I had brothers on one club that brought a collection of boomerangs to the field - we were given permission to use a municipal soccer field for some early season tossing and I thought it would be a good idea. I had no idea that boomerangs would be the center of our day.

Myself and another coach left the group and walked over to an field house to check in and sign some waiver papers. We started talking to the people in the house when one of the players came running over and wanted to know if we brought a first aid kit - nothing serious he said, it’s just that his brother got dinged by two of the boomerangs!

How in blazes did get hit twice? Was he stupid enough to get knuckled once, then stand up and walk into the same thing a second time!??

It seemed that these bright-lights brought five boomerangs to the field and let them all fly at once … then they lost track of exactly where those things were. Needless to say, everyone thought it was kind of neat till they realized that these things gotta start landing somewhere!

To make a long story short - the guy required about dozen stitches to the back of his head. But, he did have a great season that year. In fact, long after the stitches came out … the nickname boomerang stuck with the guy for years.

Coach B.[/quote]
Hey Coach B. I get what you are saying. My main focus is getting prepared for the inseason. In my mind this has been one of my best offseasons with help from new coaches and the TuffCuff Book I recently bought. Althought you cannot let baseball take up 100% of your athetic life. Sometimes you need to try new things :stuck_out_tongue:


#5

You don’t need to let it take up 100% of your athletic life, but playing a winter sport is not a good thing if you are serious about baseball. I just recently gave up basketball after 5 years playing it. I felt that i would be able to get more enjoyment out of training specifically for baseball than i would have playing basketball all winter.


#6

[quote=“Prospects23”]Hey everybody, I started playing Badminton this winter in high school just for fun. I feel that it is a great sport regarding footwork (quickness) and arm strenght when swinging the raquet. Do you guys feel that it would be benifical. Also is there any other sports/activitys that take place in the winter that would be good for baseball crosstraining.

Thanks and have a happy holidays.[/quote]

A lot of top baseball programs use raquetball in the offseason for their pitchers.

And I would disagree with people who say you have to drop other sports to become successful at baseball.


#7

To get prepared for baseball…

YOU PREPARE FOR BASEBALL


#8

To get prepared for baseball…

YOU PREPARE FOR BASEBALL[/quote]

This is true but it doesn’t necessarily limit you to baseball training.


#9

To get prepared for baseball…

YOU PREPARE FOR BASEBALL[/quote]

This is true but it doesn’t necessarily limit you to baseball training.[/quote]

You can’t expect to be the best you possibly can at baseball if your time is taken up by other sports, especially sports that you just started playing.


#10

it’s just hours taken away from potential baseball work. If you are ok with settling, by all means pursue other sports in the offseason. It all depends on your level of commitment.


#11

One thing that I’ve learned over the years is that this issue is dependant upon a persons level of athleticism and is really a 2 edged sword.

One one hand I completely agree with putting every ounce of energy into honing and developing your baseball skills (and overall athletic ability and skills). This means year round training.

On the other hand I think it is very beneficial to play other sports as there are many “cross over effects” from the other sports that benefit a baseball player (and vise versa I’m sure). There’s also the fact the most college coaches like multi sport athletes (because it’s usually an indicator of high athletic ability). Even pro’s I would imagine.

Everyone wants an ATHLETE plain and simple. Because an athlete is just better skilled and has a higher “ceiling”.

And playing sports is just flat out fun and you only have so much time to ba able to do something like that so why not take advantage of it while you can.

So for purely selfish reasons I would love to see a player focus on baseball only year round, but I think in the grand scheme of things it’s probably better for you to do as many sports as you can.

The one caveat is I would say if the one sport you love the most, and have the most potential to move on to the “next level” (if that’s what your ultimate goal is) suffers because of the other(s) sports, then I think it may be time to specialize in one thing.

I’ve heard this said: “Play all sports until your competition tells you otherwise”.

I think that’s pretty good advice. 8)


#12

101mph that couldn’t have been said better.

Almost all the position players on my team are 3 sport high school athletes.

Go to any big programs website and look at their bios and most the guys at top tier DI schools played multiple sports in high school. I’m not talking about the low level DI that i play, i’m talking the SEC and ACC schools.


#13

[quote=“UndersizedRHP”]101mph that couldn’t have been said better.

Almost all the position players on my team are 3 sport high school athletes.

Go to any big programs website and look at their bios and most the guys at top tier DI schools played multiple sports in high school. I’m not talking about the low level DI that i play, i’m talking the SEC and ACC schools.[/quote]

Well many other sports will translate to position playing, which is mainly reaction and lateral quickness. A star running back in football or a point guard in basketball should have the range to get to a ground ball deep in the hole at shortstop.

Pitching however is mainly rotation, which very few other high school sports incorporate. You will get something out of a track event such as discus, shot put, or javelin, but track and field is normally held in the same season as baseball. It is much harder to cross train for pitching through another sport than it is to cross train for position playing.


#14

To me it sounds fine. In the fall when i dont throw alot i run cross country. So if you like to play the sport play it!


#15

if you care more about having fun all around then sure. But I can tell you that cross country was the single worst activity I could have picked to do my freshman and sophomore years in terms of preparing for the upcoming baseball seasons. It made me slow, weak and tightened up my hip flexors like you wouldn’t imagine.


#16

LankyLefty wrote:
if you care more about having fun all around then sure. But I can tell you that cross country was the single worst activity I could have picked to do my freshman and sophomore years in terms of preparing for the upcoming baseball seasons. It made me slow, weak and tightened up my hip flexors like you wouldn’t imagine.[qoute]

For me it has improved my speed, leg strength, overall body strength, and pitching wise i throw much faster with the same accuracy i had before.
But next year i might do swimming.
[/quote]


#17

[quote]For me it has improved my speed, leg strength, overall body strength, and pitching wise i throw much faster with the same accuracy i had before.
But next year i might do swimming. [/quote]

Running cross country will not improve speed, nor improve the leg strength or overall body strength used for pitching, and will therefore not improve velocity much at all. Pitching is a completely max effort movement, utilizing the body’s type IIb fast twitch muscle fibers. Cross country is an endurance sport, far different from pitching. It recruits the slow twitch muscle fibers, which are relatively unused for pitching.


#18

Ok i got faster from the speed work we did at practice, which was quite often. And, my legs,AND BODY got stronger from lifting weights at practice.And, my endurance got better so i dont get tired when pitching.


#19

I did cross country for three years in high school and still got to where i need to be as far as baseball goes so if you enjoy it and work hard enough doing other sports won’t be a problem.


#20

I did cross country for three years in high school and still got to where i need to be as far as baseball goes so if you enjoy it and work hard enough doing other sports won’t be a problem.[/quote]

of course, this is relative. 3-4 months out of the year could have been devoted to proper strength training instead of slow, low intensity aerobic training. That’s 9-12 months of proper training you missed out on. Think how much better you could have been.