Creatine for pitchers


#1

When I was coming up through college, creatine (and andro, too) was all the talk in the clubhouse and in the weight room. My roommates and teammates all had a jug of the stuff in their kitchens and lockers. I’m sensing that has changed recently because when I was drafted and signed with the Chicago Cubs, there was little talk of creatine in the clubhouse.

What about your experience: Have you used creatine? Have you decided not to use creatine? Why? If you have used it, what’s been the result?


#2

I haven’t tried it, however it is incredibly tempting (about 5’11" and only 130 so I need weight/muscle)

I was talking to some upper classman at my school during fall ball and they were talking about creatine (I put my word in saying that the risk isn’t worth the results.) Only to find out that one of the best local stars is actively taking it. (He’s very good, gotten callbacks at minor league tryouts 1st basemen)

I was actually somewhat disappointed to find this out, because up until then, I had lots of respect.

I’m very mixed with my view kinda shifting. But I still think there’s some negative stuff so it’s not worth it. HARDWORK ALL THE WAY


#3

I was on weight gainer throughout HS as I hit my growth spurt my freshman year as I was 5’5" going into HS and 5’11" by Spring. Of course, I could could not gain weight at the same ratio and I weighed in at 125 LBs at 5’11" and my soph. year I was 6’2" 140LBs.

Creatine was not prescribed to me by the coaches, but if it was, I would’ve used out of blind trust.


#4

[quote=“centerfield2150”]I haven’t tried it, however it is incredibly tempting (about 5’11" and only 130 so I need weight/muscle)

I was talking to some upper classman at my school during fall ball and they were talking about creatine (I put my word in saying that the risk isn’t worth the results.) Only to find out that one of the best local stars is actively taking it. (He’s very good, gotten callbacks at minor league tryouts 1st basemen)

I was actually somewhat disappointed to find this out, because up until then, I had lots of respect.

I’m very mixed with my view kinda shifting. But I still think there’s some negative stuff so it’s not worth it. HARDWORK ALL THE WAY[/quote]

I dont really see the negative side effects of using creatine. Just make sure you drink lots of water so you dont cramp up. Also I dont see why you suffered from a loss of respect…

Supplementing with creatine allows more creatine to be used to “pump” up for muscles for intense lifting purposes, and replenish the creatine lost during the workout, so you muscle fibers can regenerate.

Creatine increases the production of ATP within the muscles, giving them more energy primarily used for quick and explosive movements. It is already naturally produced within the body, so it’s there when you do types of activities where ATP is used (like jumping). A typical Non athlete has sufficient amounts, but when the body requires more ATP, this is where supplementing with creatine comes in.

I would go so far as to say that putting creatine in a drink is better than eating 5 steaks.


#5

5 steaks would definetly cover your protein intake for the day, lol

back in i’d say 9th grade i took some creatine, i didn’t know about weightlifting or nutrition so i just took creatine…didn’t even know how much i should take…it was the worst tasting stuff, it always made me feel sick, lightheaded,etc (i think i took too much at one time)…that didn’t last long

but over the years i’ve learned alot about both training and nutrition and i decided to look for something that would aid me

I’ve been taking swole v2, its marketed as beyond creatine, so its not precisely the same thing…for one it tastes GREAT…they have a sweet tart punch which tastes like sweet tarts and a tangy orange that tastes like orange soda

i started taking it maybe a year ago, and within a month all my lifts went up and i started recieving comments like “your looking alot bigger are you taking creatine?”

I worked my ass off so I can’t say whether i can thank myself or the creatine more but i definetly DO think that it helped me…

to anyone who is interested in taking creatine or any type of supplement i would recommend you get your lifting routine and diet plan in order BEFORE even thinking about using something like creatine.

I buy my swole v2 from http://powernutrition.net/product_info.php?p=swole-v-2&products_id=192 for anyone interested i would recommend it over creatine, but you still need to eat right and train hard its not a miracle potion


#6

Creatine increases the production of ATP within the muscles, giving them more energy primarily used for quick and explosive movements. It is already naturally produced within the body, so it’s there when you do types of activities where ATP is used (like jumping). A typical Non athlete has sufficient amounts, but when the body requires more ATP, this is where supplementing with creatine comes in.
[/quote]

…you should research before makn statements like that - Adenosine Tri Phosphate (ATP) lasts for about 2seconds then another system called the ATP/PC system kicks in (adenosin tri phosphate / Phosphate Creatine) lasts for about 10 seconds - both are used in the anaerobic system.

After this the Aerobic system kicks in and this is what now give you the energy - the oxygen resynthesises the ATP.

The ATP/PC resynthesises after waiting/havn a break for about 2 minutes (80-100% resynthesises)


#7

To start, I wanna say that I’m still interested in creatine, and still thinking about trying some…

Anyways, nkro:

Have you checked out the negative effects of creatine?
Since it hasn’t been around long they still don’t know long term effect, but in another post I had found several records of heart problems as a result of creatine and even deaths.

Just wondering your thoughts.

On a side note, I’m noticing muscles develop from a little added protein, and free weight and body weight exercises.


#8

Creatine has been refined much better than when it started becoming mainstream several years ago. There are no proven negative side affects. The ATP/PC system lasts about 10-20 seconds. After that is another system called glycolysis which can be anaerobic for up to a couple minutes. This is the system that lactic acid comes from. After glycolysis comes the aerobic system. As far as power is concerned ATP/PC > glycolysis > aerobic.

Since the ATP/PC system is the most powerful, athletes try to make that system “last longer.” Creatine does exactly that. If you aren’t lifting to failure then you don’t need the extra energy but if you are lifting to failure, you could use some more creatine in your muscles.

People talking about negative side effects usually are uneducated about the issue. The main fitness organizations (National Strength and Conditioning Association, American College of Sports Medicine) both belive that creatine helps and is safe.

I’m not saying that everyone needs to be on creatine but if you have reached a plateau and you are pushing yourself to failure, you could benefit from creatine.


#9

Thanks for the input Mr Griffin, I may give it a shot after all.

I have a question for you though:
When you say lift till failure do you mean so many reps till you can’t go anymore?

Also I was curious as to weather low weight/high rep, or high weight/low rep was probably more effective. Also keep in mind I’m only 15


#10

I’m a member of the National Strength & Conditioning Association and receive both the NSCA’s Strength and Conditioning Journal and The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

It’s true that both publications have been positive about the use of creatine since 2002, when some of their first studies were published. I would caution advanced pitchers who are thinking about using creatine, however, that water consumption needs to be increased significantly to prevent cramping (by 1/3 or more).

Another thing: be prepared to be dissappointed with how you “feel” on longer runs. You’re may feel lethargic, your legs may feel heavy, and if you’re not drinking 64-80 ounces of water a day, you may cramp up.

How to administer: All studies that I’ve read lead away from “creatine loading” (or taking more than your regular daily amount during the first 7-14 days of using the product). Instead, the publications advise to simply take 2-5 grams daily post-workout.

Lastly, creatine may be best used during off-season training when weightroom strength training is most intense. Remember, in-season focus should be more skill-specific, and therefore wouldn’t necessairly require creatine use.


#11

would you recommend a 16 year old to take this? My dad took this when he was lifting hardcore he was massive, only 5’9 and maxed at 400 on bench in his prime. he never touched a steroid and went from a skinny little guy, to incredible shape without ever touching a steroid. he told me even the weakest person can become very strong with hardwork and you dont need steroids. creatine was the only thing i think he ever took and he said this was not a steroid


#12

as mike said, when you reach a plateau using creatine can be beneficial…

but you need to get your exercise regimine and your nutrition plan in check and perfected before you consider supplementing in my opinion. Get the most out of your body naturally, and when you feel you may need a little additional boost then you can try creatine or whatever else may strike you as worthwhile…

creatine isn’t a magic muscle potion…food, REAL food is the best thing to help you build muscle and increase energy when starting out


#13

mr.ellis wont creatine and andro be like a steriod then? cause doesnt steriods give u more energy. and like u siad creatine and andro also gives u energy. so wont that be illigal? im not sure though


#14

Your body naturally produces creatine already. You would just be adding more of it to gain better results. Just taking it won’t do anything, but if you have a good workout and nutritional plan set up, it may work wonders for you. It’s not illegal in any way. Just make sure you’re drinking enough water while taking it, like Steve Ellis said, your body can cramp up, and you’ll feel dehydrated.

Andro (Androstenedione), on the other hand increases the amount of testosterone your body produces. Mark McGwire admitted to taking this supplement, as of now, the NFL and U.S Olympic committee have banned this substance (I think it is banned in the MLB, and most other sports, too), and in canada, it is considered a steroid. Some side effects that may occur with taking this supplement are, deepening of the voice, acne, maybe liver damage, and probably more. Steve Ellis and Mike Griffin will be able to explain more about this supplement. I do not recommend it, and I feel you are cheating if you decide to take it.


#15

People who tend to have problems while taking creatine are the ones who just dump the stuff in there drink without measuring. They’ll feel weak and tired, and then blame it on the creatine and give it a bad rep because they decided the more, the better. I have tried creatine, but have never fully utilized it into my workout. I work out the natural way, but I make sure I get enough protein into my system, although, I am thinking about using it, though. A good nutritional drink that may help out with your workout is boost high protein, it tastes good, plus it has about 15 grams of protein and about 24 vitamins/minerals, I drink 3 of these a day.


#16

I’m not sure if this has been mentioned or not in this forum, I didn’t see it, but I could of missed it.

A negative to Creatine is it vastly effects your kidneys if you use it for a period of time.

Yes it is naturally created in your body BUT putting in more of it can and normally does do more harm then good to your kidney.

I talked to my Coaches about taking Creatine, and they didn’t recommend it because of the danger it has to you kidney


#17

[quote=“Wales Diesel”]I’m not sure if this has been mentioned or not in this forum, I didn’t see it, but I could of missed it.

A negative to Creatine is it vastly effects your kidneys if you use it for a period of time.

Yes it is naturally created in your body BUT putting in more of it can and normally does do more harm then good to your kidney.

I talked to my Coaches about taking Creatine, and they didn’t recommend it because of the danger it has to you kidney[/quote]

I’ve never read anything that proves that…

i have read if you don’t drink a large amount of water then creatine can be harmful but as long as you are drinking a ton of water then it shouldn’t be…

you should however cycle the use of creatine because if you use it everyday your body will become dependent on it


#18

When I say lifting to failure, I mean you literally can’t do another rep. If you could do another rep, you wouldn’t need that extra energy from your ATP/PC system.

I wouldn’t suggest a 15 or 16 year old player to take creatine. Its not that I think its going to hurt you but I think you’ll be wasting your money. The best thing you can do at this point is to work hard in the weight room. You shouldn’t see many, if any, plateaus at this age. When you start getting older and some of your growth slows down you might want to consider it.

Creatine has never been shown to damage kidneys. If you are taking creatine, you need to drink a lot of water. The main health problem with taking creatine has more to do with not knowing what is really in your supplement. There is no regulation of supplements by the FDA. I strongly suggest getting the better name brands even if they cost slightly more. You are more likely to get what is on the nutrition label.

I wouldn’t tell anyone to take creatine or not to take creatine, Or any supplement for that matter. I’ll just tell you some of the issues and you need to use your best judgement.


#19

Responders and non-responders. Its that simple. For every clinical study that I have researched supporting the use of creatine you can find two insisting precaution. I am currently a professor at a local college and have my students research creatine every quarter. The studies are Inconclusive to long term effects, any person who tells you differently should be held accountable. Those who have instructed the use because of either the nsca or acsm pilot studies/literature should do so using extreme caution. Vitamin E, vioxx, celebrex were all deemed safe at one point in time. Vioxx, used by the majority of pitchers for inflammation has been associated with the development of heart disease. The acting commissioner of the FDA has Subsequently openly agreed to these allegations. John Hopkins study on Vitamin E has identified the conerns on supplementation of fat-soluble vitamins. Point being, be careful of what you are instructing young athletes to do. Point them in the right direction and allow them to make educated decisions on their own. Creatine is utilized for recovery, not muscle development. Taking creatine alone will not make you stronger in itself.


#20

Doubles,
When you say you find two recommening precaution, does that mean that they found negative side effects or that they were just saying to be careful? If you have seen some research that prove negative side effects, could you please post some of the sources? I would say people need to use precaution whether or not it has been proven either way, but I’d just like to see some of the research you’ve seen.