Couple quick qestions


#1

ive been throwing at work for a while (i work graveyard, lot of downtime). i’ve tried a few pitches, and i’ve gotten some movement on them, but only every so often. it worked best when i had an old ball that had the seams sticking out more than normal (obviously). as i’ve started to throw more and more, my arm is starting to get stronger, so i can throw it harder with a bit more accuracy. my accuracy is so-so, where i can pretty much throw at the guy, but im not hitting where i want. is there a qucik fix to that, or just keep on practicing. also, t hasnt happened in a while, but when i first started to pitch at work, if i pitched too much at once back to back days, i had a lot of pain in my elbow, where i couldn’t even hold my arm still it was shaking so much. im wondering if that will come back if i ever try to pitch in any sort of league. dont know if it matters, but im 20, lefty, round 6 foot, and havnt weighed myself in a while, but i would guess bout 250.


#2

Yeah man, you need to rest in between days, it’s not good on your elbow and as I have found out myself it can be re-occurant pain if you continue not to rest. And as far as accuracy goes, just keep throwing and not to try and work on accuracy and then one day you will notice that it’s just there…it’s kinda like aging…it’s a slow steady process and you don’t realize it that much and one day you try and hit your spots and you can. Keep pitching though, your arm will continue to get stronger to. If it helps to know I’m 17 5’11’’ 168lbs…and I do pitch for my highschool…Goodluck and hang in there.


#3

make sure you don’t over do it or your going to hurt yourself. The accuracy will come as you throw more and more. Once you get your mechanics pretty solid you should be able to hit your spots easy and when you miss you’ll know why. And at 20 your not old yet but it will take longer to recover than when you were younger.


#4

Last year after I went to the Braves tryouts (and stunk up the place lol) I started trying to throw hard. Well that lasted one day. The next day, I notice that my elbow hurt very very much. I just figured that this was just a side effect of throwing hard. Well for the next month I had a ton of pain even when I threw light. What helped was me taking 3 weeks off of throwing. My elbow felt great. I still get some discomfort (mainly because I’m still trying to throw hard), but it wasn’t as much as last summer.

What I do to remedy this is to throw 60 or fewer pitches 3-4 days a week, and then one one days, throw more pitches (around 120-180 I have a bucket full of baseballs). I usually try to rest at least 2 days out of the week. Sometimes in a row.

About the accuracy, that’s another story. I notice that when I have someone catching with me, I almost always throw exactly at the glove with movement on my pitches/throws. A way that helps me is to keep my foot square to the target, try to stay back on your windup, and move your body to the target. What I mean by that is, sometimes people tend to move diagonally or to the side of the target when they throw. I find it easier to move right at the target.

Throwing often will help you figure the accuracy part out as well. I just now discovered (at least for me) that the front leg (my quad) points to the target when I throw. You may fool around with that as well. But don’t dwell on it. It takes time to build accuracy. Just have fun throwing the baseball, and hearing it sizzle through the air.


#5

One thing I find that helps me hit my spots is concentrating on pushing off towards my target hard. I doubt I’m pushing perfectly towards my spot but the push will help straighten it out if I’m pulling to hard on it and missing wide.


#6

thanks for the replies. they all make sense. another question, i was throwing last night at work, and it was my first time back to work after my days off, so i have been watching baseball for 3 days without throwing, so i was excited.when we first started i was pumped up and i would snap my wrist as i threw (just playing catch, no pitches or anything) and i noticed i got a lot more zip to it. later as i was tired, i noticed i wasn’t doing it as much. is snapping your wrist bad for your arm, or no? i dont want to get into a habit that will cause any injury


#7

It depends. If you’re snaping it downwards, you may be throwing a curveball. What do you me by zip? Zip as in movement? If so, that may be some type of breaking pitch (i.e. curveball, slider, gyroball lol). Snapping the wrist isn’t necessarily bad, but it may strain the arm if overused. Since you haven’t really thrown that way, I suggest to slowly inplement that pitch in your throwing sessions.

Snapping your wrist any otherway may result in a zip to your normal throw as well. I say, as long as you don’t feel any pain and don’t over use it, you should be fine. There’s really no right or wrong way to throw a ball. Just be carefull.

I think the reason why your throws zipped like that may be the result of two factors.

  1. You haven’t thrown for 3 days, so your arm is fresh and vibrant. I notice if I don’t throw for a week, my pitches tend to explode and move a lot while in flight (eventhough I usually throw with a lot of movement anyways). It’s pretty cool to see.

  2. Once your arm and body start to get tired, it becomes a little difficult to garner that spin and projection on the ball. The ball tends to…dud down (so to speak). Basically your body isn’t strong/adapt enough to throw that pitch for a long duration of time. At least that’s my case. Just work it out, you’ll figure it out. And also, have fun while your “fooling around” with your throws. That’s how we got the curveball, changeup, screwball, forkball, cut fastball…etc in the first place.