Cortisone Injections

Is 15 too young to have one? I have tendinitis in my elbow and Ive been looking all over the place for solutions to it. The doctor said 15 is too young but I want to see if you guys agree. My elbow has been like this for over 2 months so Im getting pretty tired of it. Any information on cortisone shots or any solutions would help

I’ve had one cortisone shot and that was in college for my elbow. For me personally it was a quick fix and not a cure all for my problem. Personally, I would recommend that you listen to your doc, considering he knows more about that stuff than probably anybody on here. I would stick to the doc’s advice on what you should do with your tendinites.

If you don’t like the opinion of that doctor, go and get a second opinion from a qualified medical expert, not a message board.

Cortisone weakens tendons. It will bring the inflammation down for the time being, but it just prolongs the problem. Whatever is causing the inflammation will still be there when you start throwing again, and then you also have to worry about tendon injuries as well. It is an option for big leaguers because they can get back on the mound faster, but for a 15 year old… Long term solution would be better than a quick fix.

The three previous posters are wise and every word they said is true. So snap out of it and listen to your doctor or get a 2nd opinion. Do not ever get medical advice on a message board. Learn how to be patient…rushing your recovery can ruin a future.

Im just seeing if you agreed, which I never ignored my doctor. I asked if you would give a little more infortmation about them. Oh yah, Its kinda hard to be rushing it when ive been resting it for 2 months.

No reason to get angry now.

My bad, all I asked for was a little advice. I think some people on here do know a little about injuries. Maybe i should have put it under the PITCHING INJURIES category.

Its all good. But getting information that could change your life off a message board doesnt make a lot of sense. I never understand why people add a new pitch, or make a huge change of mechanics because someone they dont know that lives half way across the country told them to. Its like choosing your religion based on what the History Channel has to say about it.

“Is 15 too young to have one”

No it isn’t too young to have one. Will a doctor use it, yes? Likely will attempt to reduce inflammation in other ways first. May try several things prior to using it and may never depending on your physiology.

“My elbow has been like this for over 2 months”

Unfortunately sometimes it takes much longer. Has it gotten better or worse with rest…or stayed the same? Have you asked about physical therapy? What all have you done?

You were advised a couple of times to perhaps check with another doctor.
Look for one that specializes if you can.

I think without actually saying it every one agreed that you should listen to your doctor…How much more advice do you want? And don’t take offense to that question. If you follow what was said you’ll likely (If in fact you can get better) be good as new a rapidly as can happen. Thats the reality of it. We all hope you get better soon.

Im sorry for how I reacted. Ive tried everything: Ice then Heat, Heat then Ice,only Heat, only Ice, a brace, icy hot, resting, stretching, light lifting, just about everything ive heard on the internet or from the doctor. This is why I was just curious to see if a cortisone shot would be the one thing that works or if I need to continue one of the above. The pain is only when I extend my arm out, and since the beggining it hasnt gotten better or worse

I think I had that when I was like 10. I really dont remember what it was, mainly because my dad just wouldnt let me play catch for like a month. We didnt go to the doctors or anything.

tried diet changes?
Tried pre-hab regularly?

I had the same problem with my elbow. Tendinitis is tricky because just resting it isn’t going to be the magic cure. After I realized my tendon was inflamed I didn’t pick up a baseball for 2 months. 2 months later it still hurt. The pain didnt subside until I started to do jobes. Jobes are you’re best friend. Do them every day for 3 weeks and you may be able to throw again. For me, the strengthening of the muscles in my elbow and shoulder took the strain off my elbow, and now I can pop mid 80’s with my fastball which I couldn’t do last year.

The magic cure ( for me )

-Get a 5 pound weight and a 7 pound ( red ) tube. Do 3x 20 reps 4 times a week for these:
http://www.thecompletepitcher.com/pitching_workouts/5lb_weight_program.swf
http://www.thecompletepitcher.com/pitching_workouts/tubing_program.swf

-Run 5-10 minutes after to get the blood flow up

-Take 2 ibuprofen before bed and with breakfast.

Ta-Da! Its not going to cure itself, it isnt easy, and theres no magic injection.

Good luck!

All cortisone will do is mask the pain.

It won’t address the root cause of the problem which is likely…

  1. Mechanics
  2. Overuse

Get a second opinion from a qualified sports medicine doctor or orthopedist who is familiar with throwing injuries. It is not at all rare for doctors to diagnose tendinitis as a catch all. If you haven’t had an MRI or bone scan the doctor needs to prescribe one. There are a lot of things you could have that could cause those symptoms including a stress fracture. In that case all the things you have been “trying” and all the things you are being told to try would only make it worse.

See a qualifed doctor now. Don’t let O’Leary mislead you into thinking that changing your mechanics is a cure all. Most injuries are due to a combination of overuse and genetics and have nothing to do with mechanics. He was dangerous when he was allowed on the boards before and he is dangerous now.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]
It won’t address the root cause of the problem which is likely…

  1. Mechanics

  2. Overuse[/quote]

  3. lack of conditioning.

instead of convincing players that they can get a magic fix from over thinking there mechanics, why not address the actual condition of the arm itself? When I hurt my arm I thought it was because I was throwing wrong… what I didn’t realize is I was throwing wrong because my arm wasn’t conditioned properly, which hurt my arm, which caused me to change my mechanics for the worst. Less is more when it comes to thinking in baseball.

[quote=“Ozmiummink”][quote=“Chris O’Leary”]
It won’t address the root cause of the problem which is likely…

  1. Mechanics

  2. Overuse[/quote]

  3. lack of conditioning.

instead of convincing players that they can get a magic fix from over thinking there mechanics, why not address the actual condition of the arm itself? When I hurt my arm I thought it was because I was throwing wrong… what I didn’t realize is I was throwing wrong because my arm wasn’t conditioned properly, which hurt my arm, which caused me to change my mechanics for the worst. Less is more when it comes to thinking in baseball.[/quote]

While conditioning is important, especially when it comes to the shoulder, it typically isn’t effective when it comes to elbow problems. That is because elbow problems are often related to the UCL, which is a ligament and not a muscle.

The best way to protect ligaments is via mechanical changes (e.g. pronation) that take the load off of the ligaments.

I’ve always had a lot of pronation in my delivery. I had terrable elbow problems that did not subside until I started doing a tubing / jobes program to strengthen the muscles. When you dont have any muscle mass built around your ligaments the stress fall more on those ligaments.

And believe me I thought it was my mechanics that needed changing - it just seemed logical. Being as thats all you have to go off of, I can’t blaim you for making your best guess.

The fix didn’t involve a change in mechanics. I’m sorry if this is contradictory to anything our logic can presume but thats just how it worked for me. If it worked for me it can work for someone else as I am full heartedly convinced I am not completely unique.

CONDITIONING IS ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY
If someone possess the mechanics to throw a 90 mph fastball without “90 mph of conditioning” they pose serious risk to do injury to their arm. If one is in a high level of conditioning and still experiencing pain, then by all means listen to what Chris has to say. But to have a change in mechanics supersede a change in the conditioning program is not only naive, but extremely harmful.