Correct way to throw?

My uncle is friends with Royals pitching coach Guy Hansen, who was formerly with the Richmond Braves (AAA). My uncle told Coach Hansen that he had a nephew that liked to pitch (me), and asked him if he had any pointers. Hansen replied with something along the lines of, “I have seen many pitchers destroy their arms by not throwing 3/4.”

So upon my uncle’s return, he told me about this tidbit of information, and we tossed the ball around a little bit so he could tell me what I needed to adjust ‘slot-wise’. It turns out that 3/4 is a lot lower than I previously expected. This felt very uncomfortable to me, and it still does when I try to throw that way.

So my question is, is there a correct ‘slot’ to throw from, or should one rely more on what feels comfortable?

I don’t think that there is a “correct” arm slot. Your arm slot will be what is natural to you. Many times when a pitcher tries to change his arm slot, he will end up slowing down the arm and it will be very choppy. Concentrate on staying loose and fluid in your delivery, and try to adjust the front arm if you make any changes to utilize better symmetry.

When you pitch, have ever looked at video of your mechanics?

If you havent I recommend taking a look at it because you might already throw from the 3/4 slot because of when your arm whips around, momentum will take it to that slot.

To tell you the truth, I have never taped myself pitching, or throwing for that matter. Mostly because I would not know what to look for. I may do that once it gets above freezing, to like…60 degrees outside.

I could probably upload it to putfile or google video or something. Then post the link on here.

I’ve never heard of “putfile” until you mentioned it. What benefit do they get out of allowing us to upload files? Are viruses, spyware or adware a problem there? What about Google Video?

you usually find your natural arm slot by longtossing. messing with this leads to injuries, etc.

I agree that long tossing is a good way to find your natural arm slot. Also, Tom House has some really good drills on both knees for throwers that force pitchers to find the arm action that is productive because the lower body is not available to provide momentum.

I imagine they do some kind of advertising, plus they do have accounts there that you have to pay for…I think. I know google gets money for everytime you click on one of their ads, so that works out well for them. There are no problems at either of these sites when it comes to viruses, spyware, or adware; they are completely clean.

Also, when you videotape, pay attention to your shoulder angle at release(viewed from behind). This may affect your percieved arm slot. If the upper body is not directional going into release, look at that instead of trying to change the arm slot.

So which angle(s) should I videotape from?

Also, I assume I should just throw how I usually throw.

Let me weigh in on this.

First of all, I don’t believe that arm slot is genetic. Instead, you can change your arm slot by…

  1. Taking your pitching arm back differently (e.g. breaking your hands differently).

  2. Reverse-rotating your shoulders more (or less).

  3. Tilting your shoulders.

In general, I prefer a steeper arm slot because this will tend to give the ball a more purely vertical motion, which makes it harder to perceive.

APR,

Tape from directly behind yourself, looking towards the catcher. Also from the side, at post you will be facing the camera. You may also choose to tape from behind the catcher.

Make sure you get all body parts in the shot, for example, don’t cut off the feet. Also, it will be much more effective if you have the capability to watch the video in slow motion, frame by frame forward and reverse, and still shot.

Good luck.

take a chance in changing a kids arm slot and natural genetics and you are taking a chance you are going to hurt a kids arm.

Again, I disagree that arm slot is genetic. Instead, it depends to a large degree on things like the tilt of the shoulders.

There are many pros who throw from different arm slots during the same game. They do this by changing how they take their pitching arm back and how much they tilt their shoulders.

I was more of a sidearm pitcher, or maybe a low 3/4 when I first start pitching as a pitcher for my team. But I had lot of control issues pitching as a sidearm/3-4.

So my coach asked me and taught me how to throw overhand and soon I was able to put strikes with much more velocity. Also, after practising a lot, my elbow was really hurt throwing as a sidearm pitcher. After changing to a overhand pitcher my problems on the elbow almost disappeared.

But for long toss I prefer throwing more like a 3/4. I think throwing overhand on long distances the ball end up falling to the ground before reaching the target. On short distances it is much better overhand because it go straight to the target.

My coach videotaped me from lots of different angles, and it helped me a lot identifying my problems. It’s much more difficult to correct yourself if you don’t see what your are doing.

I had exactly the same experience, which is probably why I don’t buy the idea that arm slot is genetic.

When I was in grade school, I threw sidearm/submarine. As a result, I ended up permanently damaging my shoulder.

In order to be able to play catch with my kids and throw batting practice for extended periods of time, I had to teach myself to throw with more of a 3/4 or overhand motion. It took time, but I am now a much better pitcher.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]
I had exactly the same experience, which is probably why I don’t buy the idea that arm slot is genetic.

When I was in grade school, I threw sidearm/submarine. As a result, I ended up permanently damaging my shoulder.

In order to be able to play catch with my kids and throw batting practice for extended periods of time, I had to teach myself to throw with more of a 3/4 or overhand motion. It took time, but I am now a much better pitcher.[/quote]

I was kinda of reluctant to change my way of pitching. But after lots of control issues and lot of pain on my shoulder I was convinced to change. And I think it was the best thing I could ever done.

I have read on many books and articles on the internet that a coach should never change the way someone pitch. I think if the guy can pitch well and doesn’t hurt himself, I think they might let him pitch that way, but that was not my case and that’s probably not the case of most beginners.

Dontrelle Willis has one of the most weird deliveries I have ever seen, but he can maintain himself healthy and throw consistent strikes.

So I’m with you Chris. I think it’s not a genetic thing. I think it’s more like a preference thing. Maybe the kid saw someone on the Majors pitch that way and start pitching like that.

I don’t think every coach should try to make their pitchers become a overhand pitcher also. It worked for me but it might not work for one of my teammates.

Again, back into the archives we go—you never know what you’re going to find there.
My pitching coach firmly believed that every pitcher has a natural motion, whatever it may be, and what he would do was work with that and show said pitcher how to make the most of it. He would not ever change a pitcher’s natural arm slot—not unless the pitcher was really screwing up, and then there would be some experimentation to find the arm slot that was comfortable and that enabled the pitcher to work effectively. The “natural” arm slot is a combination of things—in part genetic, in part the way the pitcher is constructed, in part just plain preference—and one needs to take all these things into consideration. You don’t just tell a pitcher he has to throw a certain way; you find out his or her most comfortable way of doing things and start there. I was a natural sidearmer, pure and simple, and my coach (an active major-league pitcher) showed me how to make the most of it. 8)

no way. you go with ur own personel preferance

I’m with Chris on this one. Surprise, Chris! :smiley: