Core work or weight lifting


#1

yeh im a freshman highschool pitcher i was just wondering to gain more velocity in pitching would it be bettr to do more core work or use the weights and lift


#2

Core work.


#3

A proper weight lifting program combined with core work will get you on your way. Do not limit yourself to core work because you may just end up just doing ab work and that is not core work.

Talk to some of the guys on this board, they can help out with a good lifting program. Be sure not to just go in the weight room and start randomly lifting…it has to be done right.

When you do lift properly and with good form, your core gets worked just in stabilizing and moving your body. That’s more beneficial than just doing 500 crunches. Med Ball work is great for pitching as well.


#4

Neither is really THE answer, but both are extremely effective in a complete program.

If you have done most of your growing, don’t be afraid to push some weights. You can get one heck of a core from doing weightlifting alone. Now when I’m talking about weightlifting I mean freeweight, compound movements. Squats and deadlifts will give you strength everywhere, and other lifts that require the stabilizing of your body throughout the lift also build the core, power cleans, bent rows, pull ups, dips

If your interested in getting more specific info on lifting let me know, and I’m sure some other guys will lend a hand in getting into baseball lifting.

As far as core work, this is good as well, but like palo said, core work, not necessarily ab work. Medicine ball is great for work, and then there are tons of other ways to work the core. Russians twists would probably be my favorite core exercise.


#5

core work no lifting not good for pitchers. A pitcher will not be flexiblie enough after weight lifting even with flexiblity programe. I’m in a this sounds weird but the best thing to do is to go to a good Dr. in physical therapy like i am its helping so much. They give u tons of stuff to do.


#6

Jay, you continually tell people to stop lifting weights when it is actually beneficial for most. I gave you the reasons why in another thread and you never responded.

It’s not like we’re advocating maxing out on your bench press here.


#7

I know that but i do not aprove of it for the reason that it reduces flex and it tightens to many musculs. I think core work with flex and arm care like wrist work that makes the elbow stronger would be fine. lounges squats and med ball are all fine to me.
Im going to a physical therapist and he thinks flex and wrist work are immportant too. Not alot of people notice the wrist controls the elbow. And injurys come from weakness in the wrist that leads to weakness in the elbow and lifting weights does not help get stronger wrists.


#8

to better improve your wrist there are dif exersizes.


#9

Well I think total body strength and flexibility is very important to pitching. Put scapula strength and stability at the top of the list too.


#10

scap over load is something that is not needed but a strong shoulder in general is.


#11

[quote=“palo20”]Well I think total body strength and flexibility is very important to pitching. Put scapula strength and stability at the top of the list too.[/quote]Agree completely. I was also glad to see that Steven’s TuffCuff program addresses it. Last season, my son had some shoulder problems that were due to scapular “winging” on his throwing arm side. Scap stabilization exercises helped greatly with his rehab.


#12

Tom House and the NPA folks also endorse scapula strengthening/stabilization.


#13

[quote=“Jay21328”]I know that but i do not aprove of it for the reason that it reduces flex and it tightens to many musculs. I think core work with flex and arm care like wrist work that makes the elbow stronger would be fine. lounges squats and med ball are all fine to me.
Im going to a physical therapist and he thinks flex and wrist work are immportant too. Not alot of people notice the wrist controls the elbow. And injurys come from weakness in the wrist that leads to weakness in the elbow and lifting weights does not help get stronger wrists.[/quote]

Ok, I’m still looking for a decent answer from you Jay, you have yet to give a full blown answer on why weightlifting hurts you, yet you tell everyone it does.

Ever seen a full olympic squat, most guys aren’t even flexible enough to do that, you need to become more flexible in most cases. If you lift complete range motion, there is no reason why it will limit flexibility.

PLEASE, please do tell, how the heck stabilizing weight in hand while doing a lift does not strengthen the wrists. After a hard workout of deadlifts or olympic lifts one might barely be able to even squeeze a stress ball some days.


Here is some real proof as well, a STUDY, by PROFESSIONALS, comparing weight lifting and medicine ball/plyo work that you love to advocate. And the lifting done in the study, isn’t even a very good program.

Baseball Throwing Velocity: A Comparison of Medicine Ball Training and Weight Training,’ Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 8(3), pp. 198-203, 1994.

QUOTED:

Weight training proved to be far superior to medicine-ball workouts, both in terms of bench-press power and throwing speed. Weight-trained athletes upgraded their baseball throwing velocity by 4.1 per cent, while medicine-ball men enhanced throwing by a statistically insignificant 1.6 percent. Control individuals also failed to improve their throwing.

Now please direct to these so called problems with weight lifting.


#14

yo stop posting if you have no idea what you’re talking about. weight lifting if done properly helps. end of story.


#15

Roger wrote:
[/quote]Tom House and the NPA folks also endorse scapula strengthening/stabilization.

How exactly do you strengthen/stabilize the scapula? Are these rotator cuff exercises?


#16

[quote=“shermanreed”][quote=“Roger”]
Tom House and the NPA folks also endorse scapula strengthening/stabilization.[/quote]
How exactly do you strengthen/stabilize the scapula? Are these rotator cuff exercises?[/quote]

They are not rotator cuff exercises but I’m not entirely up on what exercises the NPA suggests. I think a couple of exercises they suggest are the following (which can be done out on the field):

(1) Stand facing a chain link fence. Extend arms out to the side, place palms on fence, and grab fence. Pinch shoulder blades together and shake the fence using small, fast shakes. Shake for a count on ? and then release. Repeat.

(2) Stand facing away from the chain link fence. Extend arms out to the side and place hands against fence (I don’t remember if palms or backside of hands go against fence). Press hands against fence while pinching shoulder blades together. Press hard. Hold and then release. Repeat.

Steven Ellis’s book “TUFFCUFF” has a section in it on scapular stabilization although I haven’t had a chance to read it yet.

I believe Paul Nyman is big on scap loading and he may also suggest specific exercises. DM, do you know?


#17

I get the picture.


#18

[quote=“Roger”]I believe Paul Nyman is big on scap loading and he may also suggest specific exercises. DM, do you know?[/quote]I don’t know what Nyman recommends in this regard. Sorry. When my son had his issue, his PT had him do a couple of things.

  1. Lie flat on your back with a dumbell in your hand and the arm pointing straight up to the ceiling. Then push the dumbell upward by extending the arm. To do this you must abduct the scapula. Focus should be on that.

  2. Take a volleyball or soccer ball, stand next to a corner in your house, hold the ball in one hand with the elbow at shoulder height and the forearm pointing straight up (90 deg. angle at the elbow, volleyball in hand), out to the side and bounce the ball against the wall and catch it again. Bounce and catch, over and over. No pauses. It’s a plyometric type of exercise. Concentric and eccentric contractions, focussing on the entire scapular complex doing the work, not just the arm.

  3. Lie on your stomach with your arms at your sides, palms facing the ceiling. Focus on pinching the shoulder blades together and downward while lifting the hands. Again, as usual, focus on the scaps doing the work.

  4. Same as #3, but with the arms in a “goal post” formation.

  5. Then, once you’ve progressed from #3 to #4, do the same thing but this time with the arms completely pointing over your head.