Control problems


#1

My 10 year old brother (who tops out at 55 mph) pitches int he bullpen before his game and is lights out , he locates his curve and change perfect, he can throw his fastball in and out at will but when he’s in the game and pitches to his first batter he loses all control. Here’s an example. Two fastballs two strikes it’s 0-2 then he trys to come with high stuff, 1-2 then after that he walks him! He constantly gets ahead of batters but he walks a ton. It’s a mental thing, just wanted to know what advice anyody will have.

Thanks


#2

He needs to think positive thoughts
and in the present tense.
Such as:
“Relax”, “focus on the zone”, “take a breath”…
He needs to concentrate and stay focused on the batter.

Do not think about what could happen (in a bad way).


#3

What kind of games is he pitching in at this time of the year?

I really wouldn’t worry about it. For one thing, throwing in a bull pen is about as much like pitching in a game, as taking BP is like hitting in one. There’s just no way to produce the kind of pressures in practice that occur in games. It’s a learning process, and being’s how he’s only 10, and some players never figure out even after pitching 10 year or more, just accept that it’s a learned skill that has as much to do with what’s between the ears as anything else.

I would say one thing though, but I must add that a lot of people would say I’m dead wrong. Way to many pitchers get “cute” when they get into counts where everyone is expecting a K. Waste one high, waste one in the dirt, nibble here, nibble there, and throw in a couple foul balls and all of a sudden the batter’s trotting down to 1st, and the pitcher looks foolish.

With a count like that at that age, why not just challenge the hitter with the very best pitch in the arsenal and make him swing, not look? But like I said, that’s just my opinion. :wink:


#4

scorekeeper-
it’s quite amusing, actually.
Here a post sits for five years,
and then I respond to it and then you also respond to it (after five years).
:lol: :lol:


#5

[quote=“scorekeeper”]What kind of games is he pitching in at this time of the year?
I really wouldn’t worry about it. For one thing, throwing in a bull pen is about as much like pitching in a game, as taking BP is like hitting in one. There’s just no way to produce the kind of pressures in practice that occur in games. It’s a learning process, and being’s how he’s only 10, and some players never figure out even after pitching 10 year or more, just accept that it’s a learned skill that has as much to do with what’s between the ears as anything else.
I would say one thing though, but I must add that a lot of people would say I’m dead wrong. Way to many pitchers get “cute” when they get into counts where everyone is expecting a K. Waste one high, waste one in the dirt, nibble here, nibble there, and throw in a couple foul balls and all of a sudden the batter’s trotting down to 1st, and the pitcher looks foolish.
With a count like that at that age, why not just challenge the hitter with the very best pitch in the arsenal and make him swing, not look? But like I said, that’s just my opinion. ;)[/quote]

Good advice scorekeeper.


#6

To GiantsRule: It doesn’t matter how old the post is—I’ve dipped into the archives myself from time to time, and it’s amazing what I come up with. Your 10-year-old, who’s probably fifteen by now, is indeed having a control problem, and the fact that he loses control after getting an 0-2 count on the hitter might well stem from a fear of hitting him. I’ve seen this all too often in the major leagues, and believe me, it’s no fun.
But here’s a solution. This is something I used to do when I was a little snip and continued to do well into my playing days. I would get a catcher, and either he would mark off with chalk a pitcher’s rubber and a home plate, or if we could get to a playing field that wasn’t being used at the time I would take the mound and he would get behind the plate. We would then play a little game we called “Ball and Strike”—the catcher would position his mitt in various places, high, low, inside, outside, every which way but standing on his head ( :lol: ), and I would concentrate on getting the ball into the pocket of the mitt—actually, throwing through the glove, so to speak. And from time to time we would get someone to stand in the batter’s box, first on one side and then the other, so I could really zero in on the strike zone (which in my day was much bigger than it is now). We would have that guy move around in the batter’s gbox, crowd the plate, move this way and that so I could practice locating those spots.
Above all, the kid should remember something Early Wynn once said to the effect that the pitcher’s mound was his office and he didn’t want anyone messing with it. 8)


#7

[quote=“Zita Carno”]To GiantsRule: It doesn’t matter how old the post is—I’ve dipped into the archives myself from time to time, and it’s amazing what I come up with. Your 10-year-old, who’s probably fifteen by now, is indeed having a control problem, and the fact that he loses control after getting an 0-2 count on the hitter might well stem from a fear of hitting him. I’ve seen this all too often in the major leagues, and believe me, it’s no fun.
But here’s a solution. This is something I used to do when I was a little snip and continued to do well into my playing days. I would get a catcher, and either he would mark off with chalk a pitcher’s rubber and a home plate, or if we could get to a playing field that wasn’t being used at the time I would take the mound and he would get behind the plate. We would then play a little game we called “Ball and Strike”—the catcher would position his mitt in various places, high, low, inside, outside, every which way but standing on his head ( :lol: ), and I would concentrate on getting the ball into the pocket of the mitt—actually, throwing through the glove, so to speak. And from time to time we would get someone to stand in the batter’s box, first on one side and then the other, so I could really zero in on the strike zone (which in my day was much bigger than it is now). We would have that guy move around in the batter’s gbox, crowd the plate, move this way and that so I could practice locating those spots.
Above all, the kid should remember something Early Wynn once said to the effect that the pitcher’s mound was his office and he didn’t want anyone messing with it. 8)[/quote]

Sounds like a good drill, or practice- thanks for sharing it!


#8

Focus, you can throw strikes with bad mechanics and walk them all with great mechanics. It’s all in the head.


#9

This is a thread which originated in 2005.
:lol: :lol: :lol:


#10

ha


#11

[quote=“CardsWin”]This is a thread which originated in 2005.
:lol: :lol: :lol:[/quote]

Says the guy who has resurrected more old threads in the past 2 weeks, than I have seen my past 2 years being a part of this forum