Consistant release point

i have a 12 yr. old that needs some help with gaining some consitancy in his release point. any suggetions on drills etc. that might help?

just tell him to take a second before every pitch to think about where his release point is, whether its over the top,3/4,sidearm etc

Focusing on the release point is a futile endeavor. It’s about effective, repeatable mechanics with appropriate feedback from specific practice. Do you have a video you can share with us?

There’s much to be said and learned from what DM59 posted here. And in many respects I share his approach.

However, it does help a kid to begin somewhere and if talking about releases helps… well, let me try and address it.

In the upper right corner of this web page of PITCHING FORUM, Roger Clemens gives a pretty good example of an answer to your question. And although this media has its limitations, let’s refine the answer by altering the question … just a bit.

When we ask the question about a release point, we’re sometimes thinking of a single point in space… at some height or distance away from our body. As if it was in singular terms.

On the contrary, a release is dynamic as it is fluid…… from start to finish. And this release phase has just as much to do with the kind of pitch we’re delivering – fastball, slider, curve, off-speed.

But to keep things simple, think of your son’s release as a fluid motion that has a beginning and has an end. We’ll consider the four seam fastball here because it will drive home the purpose of my explanation Your son starts this phase by insuring that his fingers stay on top of the ball and not under it, when his arm is up in what’s called the “high cocked” position, and as he starts his movement forward , he should be concentrating on a target … at home plate… and his release would normally start at about cap level… continue face level … and his final report should be just over and just in front of his stride knee. His shoulders exchanging…glove side Vs pitching side, should assist this phase completely. His arm after release should be relaxed.

I should tell you that this is a tall order for a youngster. And this requires a great deal of patience and assistance from a pitching coach if at all possible. Just remember, your son is transferring energy from his body/arm … to the ball. His release must be crisp as it is fluid.

A common problem with instructing young players is watching them continually throw the ball instead of pitching the ball. I would suggest going though a release drill and making sure the arm finishes relaxed after disposing of the ball and the energy is passed on to the ball.

Take some video and make sure your son displays a nice clean arch with his motions.

Again, take a moment to watch Clemens and you’ll se what I mean.

I wish you the best with your son’s progress

Coach B.

[quote=“Coach Baker”]When we ask the question about a release point, we’re sometimes thinking of a single point in space… at some height or distance away from our body. As if it was in singular terms.[/quote]This has been my experience with various coaches and in posts on-line. I was referring to this.

[quote=“Coach Baker”]… a release is dynamic as it is fluid…… from start to finish. And this release phase has just as much to do with the kind of pitch we’re delivering – fastball, slider, curve, off-speed.[/quote]This is precisely what I believe is the more healthy, holistic view of it. Good explanation, Coach B.

To each his own, but I 110% believe focusing on release point has merit, in fact is advisable . Focus on it every day when you play catch…in you “minds eye” you should see where you want to release to ball, and understand how this can change from 1 pitch to another ( ie., a fb vs. a curve ). It really is amazing what you can teach yourself about pitching by playing catch with a purpose. Such a great time to work on the touch required to throw a consistant straight change or to get the “pull down” feel required to get that really tight spin on uncle charley.

I do believe good, repeatable mechanics are a must…but next time you play catch, keep this discussion in mind.