Comments requested on pitching windup


#1

Critiques requested on my son’s mechanics from the windup and stretch. He throws in mid seventies and is 14 years old. He’s not gotten a lot of innings pitching the past couple years but has been working hard at improving.

Thanks in advance for any advice given!

1st video

2nd video


#2

[quote=“Luv2FishKC”]Critiques requested on my son’s mechanics from the windup and stretch. He throws in mid seventies and is 14 years old. He’s not gotten a lot of innings pitching the past couple years but has been working hard at improving.

Thanks in advance for any advice given!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zy7-xQajqwk[/quote]based on what i can see, i doubt he throws mid 70s, maybe high 50s to mid 60s, ill let the gurus handle this one :lol:


#3

I had him throwing 3/4 speed for the low budget video I took ;)…

lol


#4

Well I really doubt that he can throw mid 70’s with those kind of mechanics, his lower body is virtually non-existent when it comes to creating velocity. Also, It helps more if you can do a full speed video because he might be changing things to slow down for 3/4 speed.

But a couple things I noticed…

1-Like I previously said, he has no drive with his back leg, and I can’t quite tell in this video, but I think his hips might be opening too early. Try and get him to drive atleast 80% of his total height, so if hes 5’, aim for a 4’ stride.

2-His elbows are at about a 70 degree angle in relation to his shoulders when he begins to move his arm forward. You want the elbows to be atleast parralell to the shoulders, otherwise you put extra strain on the shoulder.


#5

[quote=“Luv2FishKC”]I had him throwing 3/4 speed for the low budget video I took[/quote]I too am suspicious of the velocity but I’m more concerned about this comment. Things change as effort changes. They also change as the pitching environment does. Get him on a mound, from the proper distance and throw at game intensity. This will give the board members the best chance at seeing what’s really happening and how to help.


#6

[quote=“dm59”][quote=“Luv2FishKC”]I had him throwing 3/4 speed for the low budget video I took[/quote]I too am suspicious of the velocity but I’m more concerned about this comment. Things change as effort changes. They also change as the pitching environment does. Get him on a mound, from the proper distance and throw at game intensity. This will give the board members the best chance at seeing what’s really happening and how to help.[/quote]dm do u think mechanics get better or worse when a pitcher is throwing 3/4 speed?..because when i throw slower its much easier to focus on mechanics, its putting it all together at full speed thats hard


#7

Thanks to all for the comments. I’ll post a follow-up video with him throwing full speed outside on a mound. I tend to agree he is probably not showing full form in this video.

Thanks!


#8

[quote=“tannerlorenz”]do u think mechanics get better or worse when a pitcher is throwing 3/4 speed?..because when i throw slower its much easier to focus on mechanics, its putting it all together at full speed thats hard[/quote]The fact that they aren’t being tranferred to the game situation would mean that they’re of pretty much no value to you, unless that’s the speed you’re going to use. The real point is that pitching at game intensity must be trained. Your experience is an indication of that. Let’s say you practice your mechanics at less than game intensity and get very good at that. Then you get on a mound, in a game situation and try to transfer what you “learned” in your less than game intensity practice sessions. They’re different activities. You need to get to the point where your mechanics actually work in the game environment. You get good at what you practice.


#9

Practicing at 3/4 speed and then ramping up the effort - in off-season practice - will help many young and/or novice pitchers understand the complex nature of their own mechanics, and in my opinion can be a good tool. This is a long-term off-season process . By the first outdoor practice, the pitcher should be ready to go full speed after proper warm-up activities, and should be able to maintain that level of effort until he is gassed.

Again, just another tool in the box. But I agree that practicing only at a reduced effort level is futile and won’t help to improve game performance.


#10

Okay, I’ve captured a video of his windup on a mound going full speed. What can we do to improve his mechanics to avoid injury and increase velocity.

Here’s the new link

Thanks to all for your assistance!


#11

Don’t think I’ve ever disagreed with you on something training wise DM…so we have a first. Though I would say that analysis at a slo-mo speed is useless. I agree you get good at what you practice, that being said, the body has to understand a mechanical change if one makes one, so slowly stepping through it can prove less injurious and possible beneficial. An example is attempting to remain stacked if you have a tendancy to pull your head off the first base side, unless you understand how you are moving mechanically, you may never be able to correct the issue. Of course you also have to practice as well at game intensity, but I would suggest that if you are working on any alteration or refinement, slowly stepping through it can be a big help.
The new link didn’t direct to your son there fish.


#12

jd
I’m glad you’re keeping me on my toes. I’m not going to disagree with you though. That wouldn’t be a wise thing on my part. :smiley: Maybe I should have added or included that training at slower speeds can have it’s value but one should not think that it will transfer to the game intensity environment without actually “graduating” to that type of practice. If one finds that game intensity pitching degrades, or changes, mechanics, then that needs to be addressed and really can’t without that specific type of training, in addition to any and all other training methods. My personal OPINION though is that the specific training would give lots of “bang for the buck”.


#13

"That wouldn’t be a wise thing on my part. "

Now how do I get you to convince the Mrs. nyuknyuknyuk (In the words of the “Great Jerome”).
Your addendum brings our opine’s back into coincedence…
Now if Lovestofish would repost his You-tube link we can talk about the o.p.


#14

[quote=“jdfromfla”]Now how do I get you to convince the Mrs. [/quote]Simple. Just send me a return air ticket from Nova Scotia to Florida and back and we’ll see what we can accomplish. :wink: That would be after seeing a few pro games though.


#15

Here’s an updated video of my son pitching with higher tempo. What can we do to improve mechanics to avoid injury and increase velocity.

Thanks in advance.


#16

I would suggest working on two things.

His head is tilted to the glove side at release and that can affect control. So, I would get him to keep his head upright into and through the release.

Also, his body is well behind his front foot/knee at release whereas he should be out over the front foot more. So I would have him get the hips moving forward faster and lead with the front hip longer through the stride. Make sure he doesn’t sacrifice his knee lift which he’ll want to do to catch himself and keep from falling down. Instead, make sure he swings the leg out front faster. This will generate more momentum and help carry his body further out front. It may also lengthen his stride which, in this case, would be a good thing.


#17

Without going into great detail about every little part of his delivery, which isn’t really too bad, the most obvious thing I’d like to note is how stunted his stride is. The front foot simply drops from his knee lift, down to landing. He’s not developing any toward the plate momentum that can be transferred into rotational at landing. I suggest he get the left side of his body moving longer and harder toward the target.


#18

I can definitely see the head leaning to the glove side with the video in slo-mo. We’ll work on that and also get his front leg/hip striding faster towards the plate with the intent of getting his release up over or more near the front knee.

Thank you for your solid advice! I’ll try and update you down the road on progress. Take Care


#19

Make sure he leads with his front hip - not his leg - through the first part of the stride. We don’t want him to open up the hips too soon. Lead with the hip early and then swing the leg out faster late.


#20

[quote=“Luv2FishKC”]Okay, I’ve captured a video of his windup on a mound going full speed. What can we do to improve his mechanics to avoid injury and increase velocity.

Here’s the new link

Thanks to all for your assistance![/quote]

are you positive he throws mid 70’s? he arm speed looks about the same speed as when he was throwing 75% from what i saw it might even be slower.

anyways from what i see he definitely need a long stride…get your lower body into it. he throws to upright aswell. I would also work on his looseness. He seems really uptight which makes his motion seem somewhat generic and stiff