College Pitcher Off-Season Bullpen UPDATE VIDEO INCLUDED!

ok its not here yet, but it will b in the next few days, just getting peoples attention, i read a lot of great comments on other pitchers mechanics and i hope i can get some of that feedback as well, expect the vids by Saturday the latest , i kno theres quite a few knowledgeable pitchers, coaches, critics that post here so please gimmie all that youve got when i put up the videos

Here is my basic info tho jus so u guys kno what ur lookin at:
6’4
215
max velo - 86 (not really a power pitcher, more of a change of speed groundball kind of guy)

theres the video please lemme kno whatever you think even if ur just gonna say looks good or that i suck, any feedback will b appreciated

pretty solid. if you’re looking for more velocity, you could try to tilt more after you get to the top of your delivery (the balance point cuss word to many). with your frame and levers it could really help. chack out the sandy koufax video clip on the site.

do you throw a sinker? if you have a good one you can pitch at 84-86. sinkers usually take 2-3 mph off the pitch but the movement is well worth the velocity decrease.

ok i see what you mean i watched the video, if were talking about the same thing my coach calls that “throwing uphill” and thinks its one of the worst things you can do, says it puts you in position where youll have to rush your arm

i throw probably the most inconsistent 2-seamer ever, one day itll be disgusting breaking bats all over the place, and the next day itll be flat as anything , the balance point that you speak of is probably the number 1 thing that my coach preaches, he even makes us pause there for a few seconds during our bullpens. i feel that prevents me from building my momentum, but he says its vital for balance i dont kno what to think, and could you explain what you mean about tilting at the balance point??

[quote=“qcbaseball”]…the balance point that you speak of is probably the number 1 thing that my coach preaches,…[/quote]That’s too bad. :frowning:

[quote=“qcbaseball”]…he even makes us pause there for a few seconds during our bullpens. i feel that prevents me from building my momentum, …[/quote]Well, I agree with that statement. It also doesn’t actually help build momentum, does it?

[quote=“qcbaseball”]…but he says its vital for balance …[/quote]At that point, yes, but so much happens after that, giving lots of opportunity for balance issues as you move.

As you approach the top of your knee lift, rock your pelvis a bit, starting the move toward the target with your front hip. Watch Nolan Ryan in this clip.

Brian,

Just a few quick questions for you:

  1. Were you recruited? If so, where did your recruiter want you to fit in?
  2. Does your club have a rotation policy? in other words, are there certain
    pitchers that are STARTERS, while others are fitted in as needed?
  3. Did your pitching coach interview before you joined the club?
  4. Have you been told where you fit in to the pitching logic NOW - or do you and the other pitchers go-with-the-flow?
  5. Is your pitching coach a repeat from last year or new this year?
  6. What’s the other pitcher’s like compared to you? bigger, smaller, same
    size…?
  7. How many catchers does yiour club have? Do any of these backstops have the confidence and game savy to call signals?
  8. What’s your take on the relationship between the catchers and your pitching coach?
  9. Who coaches your catchers?
  10. What’s your club noted for - heat, junk guys, one or two shinning stars?
  11. What year are you in?
  12. And last but not least, – you’re throwing pretty hard for this time of the year. Was this video taken recently? If you are NOW throwing-- what kind of pre-season conditioning program are you in for this college?

Based on what I’ve seen in your video, it’s unusual for someone at the college level - with your kind of power to have a random glove spot (location) after the hand seperation and glove extension. Not that glove extension is bad — your pitching coach should address this with you one-on-one NOW. Ask him for a “glove spot routine” where you become comfrotable with its final location-- then move your chest/ribs/hips to that location… don’t fall prey to concentrating on stiff arming your glove side …then trying to curl it in. (that action locks the shoulders something bad.) In any event, You’ll derive a lot of “umphhh!” and locate your target(s) better sixty plus feet away.

Also, go easy with bringing up other people’s suggestions. Some guys take offense to it big time. In that regard, although the advice that you received here from dm59 and dusty delso is based on sound judgement, your pitching coach may notices you trying something different— other than what he’s use to – so use your best judgement. You know this man better than we do.

Coach B.

I think your mechanics look really nice. And I like the momentum and stride length. I have only two comments for you.

First, as Coach B touched on, I suggest trying to stabilize your glove out front a bit more. That may help reduce the inconsistency that you mentioned.

Second, although you already start on the left side of the rubber, I suggest moving even further to the left so that your drag line ends on the centerline of the rubber. This will reduce postural changes that might occur in attempting to square up to the target at release and which are caused by your striding a bit to the throwing arm side.

[quote=“Coach Baker”]Brian,

Just a few quick questions for you:

  1. Were you recruited? If so, where did your recruiter want you to fit in?
  2. Does your club have a rotation policy? in other words, are there certain
    pitchers that are STARTERS, while others are fitted in as needed?
  3. Did your pitching coach interview before you joined the club?
  4. Have you been told where you fit in to the pitching logic NOW - or do you and the other pitchers go-with-the-flow?
  5. Is your pitching coach a repeat from last year or new this year?
  6. What’s the other pitcher’s like compared to you? bigger, smaller, same
    size…?
  7. How many catchers does yiour club have? Do any of these backstops have the confidence and game savy to call signals?
  8. What’s your take on the relationship between the catchers and your pitching coach?
  9. Who coaches your catchers?
  10. What’s your club noted for - heat, junk guys, one or two shinning stars?
  11. What year are you in?
  12. And last but not least, – you’re throwing pretty hard for this time of the year. Was this video taken recently? If you are NOW throwing-- what kind of pre-season conditioning program are you in for this college?

Based on what I’ve seen in your video, it’s unusual for someone at the college level - with your kind of power to have a random glove spot (location) after the hand seperation and glove extension. Not that glove extension is bad — your pitching coach should address this with you one-on-one NOW. Ask him for a “glove spot routine” where you become comfrotable with its final location-- then move your chest/ribs/hips to that location… don’t fall prey to concentrating on stiff arming your glove side …then trying to curl it in. (that action locks the shoulders something bad.) In any event, You’ll derive a lot of “umphhh!” and locate your target(s) better sixty plus feet away.

Also, go easy with bringing up other people’s suggestions. Some guys take offense to it big time. In that regard, although the advice that you received here from dm59 and dusty delso is based on sound judgement, your pitching coach may notices you trying something different— other than what he’s use to – so use your best judgement. You know this man better than we do.

Coach B.[/quote]

1)- I was recruited by St. Francis NY and Sacred Heart and was told 2 months b4 high school was over that they were dropping their baseball program at St Francis and decided that Sacred Heart wasnt the right fit for me so i had to just find any school and Queens College was more than happy to take me.
2)- There is a 3 man solid rotation with 1 spot starter i guess you could say
3)- I didn’t know any of the coaches before I came, no interviews anything
4)- Official Practice starts the 7th so I’m going to have a talk with the coach about it then.
5)- We have two pitching coaches, one is 70+ and has been there a long time Ray Metsky and the other was a player for the school in 98 and has coached since
6)- Im one of the biggest kids on the team’
7)- We have 4 Catchers and they all have their flaws but are all decent, the catchers coach always calls the games
8 ) - Catchers and pitching coaches dont really talk at all
9)- We have a catching coach, and he is actually our best coach
10)- My club is known for being an easy win for the opponent
11)- Im a sophmore
12)- Im following tuffcuff and we start practice monday

and could you explain exactly what you mean by random glove spot? ive never heard that expression THANKS!

Do you throw just as hard from the stretch as you throw from the wind up?

Is that a curvball he’s throwing? I would say so…perhaps its the camera angle, but his throwing elbow seems awfully low there.

Hmmm. Not sure why my quote is there. I was pointing to the pelvic motion.

from the stretch if i lift my leg i get almost as much on my fastball, but from the slide step i lose a little

Is that a curvball he’s throwing? I would say so…perhaps its the camera angle, but his throwing elbow seems awfully low there.[/quote]

This is Nolan Ryan’s standard arm slot and arm action.

His elbow stays much lower than many people seem to believe.

hey chris now that your in this post, what do you think of my mechanics?

I don’t have much to add.

Generally, you look good.

I’m not a fan of the balance point and think you should study what Nolan Ryan does in that clip.

I don’t see significant inconsistency in the glove.

Yeah, and I hijacked the thread :wink:

I was looking at all of the Ryan clips on this site and it amazes me the ease with which he throws that fastball. Note the 5th vid down…watch his arm as he releases the ball. What really impresses me is the deceleration of his arm starts almost beforehe releases it! Just incredible…it’s no wonder he pitched so hard for so long.

And of course, his hip/shoulder separation is big league too.

Hose

the tilt is exactly what they show in the ryan clip. get the hips going to the plate in front of the shoulders and upper body. the koufax clip shows it very well also. i’m still thinking about the drag line going straight to the plate. the reason i say that is when you look at the clip of koufax thrwing at yankee stadium and striking out the first 4 yankees he faced (when he was in his prime and going his best. his drag line is directly toward the first base dugout. maddux in clips of the world series against the yankees, is straighter but still looks to me like he drags a little toward the third base dugout. see what you think if you can view some clips of them.

I’m going to answer your question about glove/glove arm disciplines, but I hesitate to go beyond that due to your situation – being a sophomore on a club with a pitching coach and the fact that you’re 6’4” and 215 pounds.
With that kind of build you have the potential to pounding down some serious heat … and that requires personal attention, one on one. **More on that later.
Please note the three pictures below A, B, and C. Each of these pictures were taken at various stages in his professional’s career. However, notice his glove discipline. Every single time he made his delivery his glove –just before meeting his upper rib cage, was in the same location. That is serious concentration that has been groomed over long periods of practice.
In that regard, practice over and over again soon lead to performance without even thinking about it. Also, this “glove spot” was at the end of a cycle of glove arm retardation that allow his upper torso to hold back as his stride leg took its stretch towards the plate. Notice the red half circle with the broken line. Also, notice his upper torso and shoulders which allowed him to “show the ball to second base” . All of this combined to give his body the maximum advantage of his weight forward plus his muscular strength. Also, notice that he collapses on the instep of his pivot foot naturally thus allowing everything upstairs to do its thing.

This glove cycle discipline is common among professionals. Take a look
at the three that I’ve pictured below. Notice how their stride leg takes the
forward motion toward the plate first – not the glove.

I’d also like to make a suggestion with respect to the issue of accuracy –
if I understood your comments. When you start your tossing in addition
to your pitching – target the player that’s catching you by throwing/pitching to the right side of their face/mask. (your right) You should concentrate on hitting this area ten times out of ten. You should be using a four seam grip. If your not hitting this target repeatedly, , you’re either not concentrating or something in your motion (mechanics) is working against you. TIME TO TALK TO COACH. THAT’S WHAT HE’S THERE FOR.

About your pitching coach**. Your pitching coach is no stranger to New England collegiate baseball. He is highly respected and well thought of. And although I live in Massachusetts I would have no hesitation in complimenting his achievements and his longevity regardless of where he coaches and/or the environment that applies his craft. And with that last remark comes some advice:
… you remarks about your pitching coach — a guy in his 70’s – may not be taken favorably, regardless how you intended it. In other words, it may sound to some that your complaining about a guy whose so old that he can’t coach. Well, like a lot of us who are or were in the same business – we know that sometimes a lot of things are out of our control. Some of us had to at one time or another – make due what we had. It’s no fun, I’m sure you know, being at the bottom of the food chain. But there is one thing that remains constant, especially among coaches – not matter where we are, and that’s loyalty. So regardless of who you’re talking to, when, where and why – always speak
well of your coaches … or don’t speak at all. It’s important.

I wish you the best.

Coach B.

first off, thanks for the very informative explanation i can see what u mean much better with the visuals i appreciate it.

now for this quote

[quote=“Coach Baker”]
About your pitching coach**. Your pitching coach is no stranger to New England collegiate baseball. He is highly respected and well thought of. And although I live in Massachusetts I would have no hesitation in complimenting his achievements and his longevity regardless of where he coaches and/or the environment that applies his craft. And with that last remark comes some advice:
… you remarks about your pitching coach — a guy in his 70’s – may not be taken favorably, regardless how you intended it. In other words, it may sound to some that your complaining about a guy whose so old that he can’t coach. Well, like a lot of us who are or were in the same business – we know that sometimes a lot of things are out of our control. Some of us had to at one time or another – make due what we had. It’s no fun, I’m sure you know, being at the bottom of the food chain. But there is one thing that remains constant, especially among coaches – not matter where we are, and that’s loyalty. So regardless of who you’re talking to, when, where and why – always speak
well of your coaches … or don’t speak at all. It’s important.

I wish you the best.

Coach B.[/quote]

Coach Metsky is one of the most beloved people that i know, everywhere he goes he receives the respect and love that he deserves, always looking to help every1 and tells it like it is. all i was trying to say was that he was an advocate of old school mechanics and techniques and is pretty stubborn about them sometimes as well, i in no way meant any disrepect to any of my elders especially not Coach Metsky

well thank you very much for your input and i apologize for any way that you may have taken my statements as an insult

Coach Metski is a professional coach with an emphasis on professional. He is no stranger to us here in Western Massachusetts and Northern Connecticut. That being said, if Coach Metski has some time ask him about his views on how to pitch a game. Not just about form and procedure, grips and styles – but about thinking beyond the pitch, the dynamics of the game itself. Sit back and listen … don’t take notes, don’t talk, don’t interrupt – just listen to years of skill and finesse. Knowledge that you can’t get from a video or book. Once you hear a man of his experience tell you why you pitch – not just how, it all comes together. You’ll see. I wish you the very best.

Coach B.

ps
I know you were sincere in your remarks of Coach Metski. No apology necessary here. The only reason for my highlighting that remark was to alert you to the views of others that might be quicker on the trigger and thus form opinions. I know your institution has a wide age range in coaches and in some colleges this has been a point of friction.