College Pitcher Breaking Down/Questions on Throwing Schedule

I’m currently in my second year at a JUCO. fielding offers from some d1’s, d2’s, and keeping d3’s in my pocket.

I’ve thrown up over 150 innings this spring/summer/fall. I’ve been having a ton of internal rotation inflexibility, elbow pain, and alot of mechanical breakdowns.

should I be shutting it down for the next 3-5 months from throwing? I’m noticably worn thin. I’m considering seeing an arm specialist doing some therapy.

anyone have any comments? what’s the usual college/professional throwing schedule like throughout the year?

Please don’t get angry at my question if you’re not, but are you kidding?

apparently alot was lost in translation there.

basically looking for answers to the following questions.

  1. Anyone have a good rehabilitation strategy for shoulder inflexibility, most notiably internal rotation.
  2. For guys in college right now, what’s your throwing schedule look like throughout the year. I’m not talking day by day one day max effort pen, then a side day. do you guys usually throw in fall ball followed by extensive time of no throwing right up to the spring season. because from what I’ve seen fall ball and early february games only leave so much time to rest.

Our non-pro post-pubescent guys take no time off of throwing. Now, do they pitch less? Certainly. But college guys coming off 120-150+ innings in spring/summer/fall ball are still throwing long toss, batting practice, and weighted baseballs from time to time as well.

There is no skill you get better at doing by not doing it. Rest has its place but is by and large just atrophy.

Of course, you have extenuating circumstances. You have GIRD-related issues that were probably not appropriately looked into during the season. Sleeper stretches in-season, cross-body stretches, specific band work, medicine ball training - all of these things could have mitigated the loss of throwing shoulder IR. So an aggressive off-season throwing program is probably not for you, but I wouldn’t advocate shutting it down completely either.

I’d look into some manual therapy and soft tissue work for your throwing shoulder/arm. Possibly Graston Technique or Active Release Techniques combined with frequent foam rolling/self-myofascial release, as well as gently stretching your throwing shoulder into IR and the glove shoulder into ER.

There’s a lot more that can be done, but advice over the Internet is only so useful.

[quote=“kyleb”]Our non-pro post-pubescent guys take no time off of throwing. Now, do they pitch less? Certainly. But college guys coming off 120-150+ innings in spring/summer/fall ball are still throwing long toss, batting practice, and weighted baseballs from time to time as well.

There is no skill you get better at doing by not doing it. Rest has its place but is by and large just atrophy.[/quote]

true, and I agree. the learning and development process never takes a day off.

[quote=“kyleb”]Of course, you have extenuating circumstances. You have GIRD-related issues that were probably not appropriately looked into during the season. Sleeper stretches in-season, cross-body stretches, specific band work, medicine ball training - all of these things could have mitigated the loss of throwing shoulder IR. So an aggressive off-season throwing program is probably not for you, but I wouldn’t advocate shutting it down completely either.

I’d look into some manual therapy and soft tissue work for your throwing shoulder/arm. Possibly Graston Technique or Active Release Techniques combined with frequent foam rolling/self-myofascial release, as well as gently stretching your throwing shoulder into IR and the glove shoulder into ER.

There’s a lot more that can be done, but advice over the Internet is only so useful.[/quote]

appreciate the post.

@kyleb

would you recommend seeing a specialist for active release or do you have any diy techniques.

[quote=“ltownindians07”]@kyleb

would you recommend seeing a specialist for active release or do you have any diy techniques.[/quote]

By definition ART is done by specialists/professionals.

As for your own self-myofascial release techniques, you can start with this great article: