College Eligibility Question


#1

Can anyone help clarify this?

If a JUCO player is offered a D1 scholarship after his two years in JUCO, attends the fall semester at the D1 but has to leave school for reasons other than baseball how will this affect his eligibility? If he is able to go back to the same school next fall or even a different school will he lose a year of eligibility, or will he still have two years left?

This is a twice-drafted lefthanded pitcher. Should he lose a year of eligibility, given that seniors are not drafted very high, would he be just as well off going to pro tryout camps? Also, does the team that drafted him in 2006 still have the signing rights to him?

I know I have a lot of questions here…but this just happened recently and we are not sure how he will be affected.


#2

[quote]Can anyone help clarify this?

If a JUCO player is offered a D1 scholarship after his two years in JUCO, attends the fall semester at the D1 but has to leave school for reasons other than baseball how will this affect his eligibility? If he is able to go back to the same school next fall or even a different school will he lose a year of eligibility, or will he still have two years left?

This is a twice-drafted lefthanded pitcher. Should he lose a year of eligibility, given that seniors are not drafted very high, would he be just as well off going to pro tryout camps? Also, does the team that drafted him in 2006 still have the signing rights to him?

I know I have a lot of questions here…but this just happened recently and we are not sure how he will be affected. Can anyone help clarify this?

If a JUCO player is offered a D1 scholarship after his two years in JUCO, attends the fall semester at the D1 but has to leave school for reasons other than baseball how will this affect his eligibility? If he is able to go back to the same school next fall or even a different school will he lose a year of eligibility, or will he still have two years left?

This is a twice-drafted lefthanded pitcher. Should he lose a year of eligibility, given that seniors are not drafted very high, would he be just as well off going to pro tryout camps? Also, does the team that drafted him in 2006 still have the signing rights to him?

I know I have a lot of questions here…but this just happened recently and we are not sure how he will be affected. [/quote]

I’m pretty sure that the only way eligibility is lost is when a player actually plays in a game, fall or spring. So if this player attended school in the fall, and did not play fall baseball in an actual game, then he still has 2 years left of eligibility.

As far as seniors not being drafted as high, this isn’t entirely true. The reason you don’t see many seniors in the the 1st 5 rounds of the draft is because all of the top players come out as juniors because this is where the money is for college baseball players. Seniors are seen as easy signs and receive significantly less money than juniors (except in special cases). So the question is, if this LHP is good enough, he’ll get drafted where he should get drafted, but he would have a better chance of getting a good signing bonus as a junior.

Now, I’m also pretty sure that MLB did away with the entire Draft and Follow process this past year. That means that the team that drafted this pitcher does not own his rights. Also in that mix is the fact that he did attend a 4 year college, so he is now fair game in next year’s draft. Also, I don’t think he can sign a pro contract until next year’s draft as well.


#3

Actually…there is no ‘coming out’ in baseball the way players are required to declare in football and basketball. All college juniors are draft eligible. It’s rare nowadays to see a college senior drafted in the money rounds for baseball. I have seen some very good seniors drafted in rounds 40-50 because they do not have to draft them early since there is no where else for them to go.

I don’t know if they did away with the draft and follow this year. He was a DnF after the 2005 draft and stayed for his second year of JUCO. He was then offered a scholarship by a top D1 school, so he did not consider signing after the 2006 draft even though he moved up in that draft by 19 rounds.

I checked the NCAA site, but could not find anything related to this situation. If it was there I missed it.

Thanks for your inout. I hope you are correct.


#4

You’re correct, there is no “coming out.” What I meant was that college juniors who are drafted fairly high have no benefit in coming back to school in most cases.

Baseball America has some good articles about the rules changes for the draft, particularly the draft and follow system.


#5

pitchtowin,
You might want to try the hsbaseballweb site. They have a lot of posters with experience in that area.