Cold weather solution

to getting your work in.

Nothing can compare to getting outside and hitting your target.

This drill is as close as it gets to getting in a indoor facility.

This you can do in your own bedroom.

Enjoy! I hope this helps.

The last 2 minutes of clip is my favorite and what ties the drill together. Visualization is BIG!!!

NO LIMITS !!

2+2=5

I have a question about this drill…when your pitcher releases the ball into the sock at peak delivery speed, his arm also must obviously stop the ball abruptly just after the release. That part of the drill is not normal to what a pitcher does, and I wondered if your guys who have tried this drill made any comments about the way that feels.

Personally, if my son were confined to the house by snow (we live in NorCal, so fortunately that’s not a problem for us)…I think I’d rather that he build a backstop out of blankets, pillows, dirty laundry, etc, and throw into that from a few feet away.

What you do is leave about four inches of sock so when you release the ball it will travel a little bit and you can continue with your follow through

[quote=“laflippin”]I have a question about this drill…when your pitcher releases the ball into the sock at peak delivery speed, his arm also must obviously stop the ball abruptly just after the release. That part of the drill is not normal to what a pitcher does, and I wondered if your guys who have tried this drill made any comments about the way that feels.

Personally, if my son were confined to the house by snow (we live in NorCal, so fortunately that’s not a problem for us)…I think I’d rather that he build a backstop out of blankets, pillows, dirty laundry, etc, and throw into that from a few feet away.[/quote]

The arm does not stop abruptly…? You should give it a try. I would not place it on here if it would cause a problem or had caused a problem. 12 years and 100 plus pitchers later, not one problem. I have constant communication with my guys. But hey, there is always a first.
You might have a point if you thought of it as a towel drill alternative, and pushed the ball, or reached as in a javelin throw, but with the arc of the arm have not found it to be a problem.
Just part of the buffet. Take what you want.
This drill is not to take place of hitting your target and actually making throws. This is an elimination of excuses/reasons for not keeping your throwing routine and a bit of help for those like OKC that can’t get out for a day or two due to maybe an ice storm. It is really based on your urgency to be great.
Agree with piling things up and throwing into it. Nice.
“You’re no semi-pro laflippin” :smiley:

That’s pretty cool and I will have to give it a try sometime. I just recently bought a sock net and have been throwing into it in our garage. There is no excuse for not being able to throw in the winter lol

Fred,

If you will please re-read my comment, I was not suggesting that the pitcher’s arm stops abruptly.

But, the pitcher’s arm must stop the ball abruptly because the ball is released, it travels a few inches to the end of the sock at whatever release speed the pitcher gave it, and stops because it is essentially tethered to the pitcher’s arm.

Clearly, in a real pitching motion the pitcher releases the ball and his arm follows through into deceleration; however, the released ball is not attached to his arm by a tether, or sock, so his actual pitching mechanics are not affected by any additional forces required to stop the released ball.

I was really just curious if any of your pitchers had ever commented on the difference.

I think this is a great idea, don’t get me wrong. Anything that you can do inside to keep you going is great. But I want to point something key out to everyone.

You don’t need to have anything for your body to work on your mechanics. If you are cooped inside and you want to work on it, why not just use your body? I know that I do this all the time! If I have time, on a friday night, a saturday night, anytime I don’t have something to do and I am free, I will be somewhere practicing. That doesn’t mean I always have everything I need.

I will spend a lot of time with hitting drills without a bat in my dorm room. This is where mechanics are built. Through proper mechanical repetition. The same can be said with pitching. The other day I worked on pickoffs, just closing my eyes, imaging where first base would be, and then picking off. I practice my pitching motion, my balance point, etc.

So everyone is right, there is no excuse to go dry and not do baseball oriented things, but don’t get too caught up in having socks, a glove, anything. The two most important things are right in front of you. Your body and your mind.

And then there’s this;

The last video on the page Fred. Beleive it or not the idea was patented.

[quote=“CSOleson”]
You don’t need to have anything for your body to work on your mechanics. If you are cooped inside and you want to work on it, why not just use your body? I know that I do this all the time! If I have time, on a friday night, a saturday night, anytime I don’t have something to do and I am free, I will be somewhere practicing. That doesn’t mean I always have everything I need.

So everyone is right, there is no excuse to go dry and not do baseball oriented things, but don’t get too caught up in having socks, a glove, anything. The two most important things are right in front of you. Your body and your mind.[/quote]

CSOlsen,
Heard this from a very good source in the throwing community years ago pertaining to dry runs or simply going through the motion with out the ball.
They did studies on mimes that showed even if you could replicate an action, like drinking water. You can see the glass, you can see him drinking it, though there was no glass or water… the electrodes showed minimal to no activity from the action. Put the glass in his hand and take a drink, everything went as far as information.
There will be little to no carry over from dry runs. You can fool the brain oh so much. This made sense to me after I heard this, I would have lessons and ball players go home and do 200 dry runs whether on arm action or posture or delivery, and these guys would work dilligently only to return to me with the same problem when a ball was in there hand. Now do that same thing with a ball in your hand and the body will understand. Hitting is not a dry run if you are swinging a bat.
The beauty of doing it with the sock and in front of a mirror is you are truly in an information getting arena. Also, taking the end result out of it, you will find that adjustments come quicker.
Dry runs do have a purpose though, they strengthen the brain I think, and they also put money in the bank as far as work ethic goes. No one should outwork you. And if you spend a commercial break dry running a scenerio like the last pitch of a national championship, you are doing mor than the one sitting on the couch wishing he had a pocket fisherman.

[quote=“jdfromfla”]And then there’s this;

The last video on the page Fred. Beleive it or not the idea was patented.[/quote]

That is awesome!
I wonder how much they are?
I would have attempted a patent but wouldn’t pay the high cost of one due to the fact that everyone has socks, and didn’t think it would cover the price of the patent.

If it is paying for his childs education, I will be bummed out for not doing it.

That is great.

I have heard jokes from coaches and players that I should make one like a hand puppet of my likeness that would talk back to you with positive re-enforcement. Either electronically like those gift cards or by the one using it. :lol:

I think 1 of his kids is in the bigs another is in the minors.
Just goes to show ya, folks WILL figure it out when they need to. I know an aquaintence of yours (Dusty Rhodes formerly HC at UNF and now working for the Brewers) had a very simple to build batting T that used stuff like a shower rod and a piece of plywood and it was far superior to anything you could buy…
(Has anyone told you how much you look like a younger Clint Hurdle??..kinda freaky if you ask me… :lol: )

Very cool winter program, never would have thought about that until I saw it…I like it a lot.

Thanks for the tip. Love your blog, too.

Pretty cool coach…I like the idea of the hand puppet…:0

Believe I read somewhere here that a patent later came out; does not suprise me.

When I was a NCAA DII pitching coach (2000-2005) we used a long toss drill into nets from a friend of mine who at the time was the minor league pitching coordinator for the Royals…one day in '03 or '04 one of our pitchers came up with this very idea as a supplement to what we were doing with our Minnesota in door long toss program (field house space not big enough to stretch it out.

The staff laughed at the idea but I was wheeling it around in my head while he explained it…made some sense. So I told that pitcher to go home that night and come up with something a little more sound and I would do the same; then we would try it at practice and see what every one thought.

I did it at home that night and loved it!

The next day we had every kid try it and not one of them did not like the feel of the drill.

Up here in Mn we have to get creative about this type of stuff.

The kid whose idea it was…Billy Mauer…brother of Joe…just goes to show you anyone can learn from their players any time they are willing to listen.

I have been using the non-tethered ball in the sock ever since and think it is the best drill for throwing a ball without actually throwing one I have ever seen!

Great post coach!

[quote=“CoachConley30”]

The kid whose idea it was…Billy Mauer…brother of Joe…just goes to show you anyone can learn from their players any time they are willing to listen.

Great post coach![/quote]

Heard someplace that Billy’s brother turned out to be a fairly decent player. :slight_smile:

Twins signed Billy after his senior year for us after he was our ace in helping us win a share of the conference cahmionship that seasons.

Got as far as high A…outstanding circle change…90-92…developed some arm issues now he owns a car dealership up here in the northwoods.

Great person just like the rest of the Mauer family!

The other Mauer (Jake) was one very smooth infielder in the Twin’s organization now he is coaching in their minor league system.