Chapman/House and a neat vid


#1

http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=5661690&categoryid=2378529[/url]


#2

Cool! Thanks for posting that.


#3

Thanks, that was very interesting.


#4

I like the overhead explanation of hip/shoulder separation. The clip presents a very nice visual of that extremely important aspect of the pitching delivery.

Chap is a stud. Period.


#5

this is amazing. thats interesting that his release point is so far out. and like steven said i also love the thing about the hip and shoulder seperation.

thx man


#6

Agree completely…that was a really nice discussion of Chapman’s mechanics.

The early seeds of thought about hip-shoulder separation and optimal use of the hips and torso in a pitching delivery, or a hitter’s swing, were planted by Jim Dixon in his very interesting book: “Exceptional Player–The Secret of the 95 mph Fastball”. Paul Nyman’s website has a very nice homage to Dixon and more technical information about his ideas.

Tom House also brought this important topic into sharp focus with the introduction of high speed motion analysis for pitchers in the late 80s - early 90s…the slick analytical tools used in the outstanding Chapman discussion have evolved greatly over the past 20 years.

To go further: From what I can understand Dixon, Nyman, and House all seem to agree that the “X-factor”, a highly efficient timing and sequencing of the hip-shoulder separation and delayed shoulder rotation, may be a fundamentally important difference between most elite pitchers and 90 - 95 % of the rest of us.

Dixon, in particular, asserted that 10% or so of the population may just naturally “get it”–he believed that this was the central feature that distinguishes “gifted” pitchers from the rest of us.

Another area of apparent agreement between Dixon, Nyman, and House is: The 90% of us who don’t “naturally get it” from birth may still have a chance to learn it. There is no question, you cannot revise the genetics you were born with…however, you can optimize your abilities with properly focused training to make the most out of your genetics.

That being said, hip-shoulder separation and delayed shoulder (upper torso) rotation happens over such a very short time period in typical pitching deliveries, even in LL deliveries, that this exceedingly important feature has proven to be the most difficult one to focus training and optimization on.

Any training protocols that can demonstrably train and enhance “where 80% of a pitcher’s velocity comes from” are bound to be popular!

There has been some discussion of this topic before at LTP…maybe it’s time for an update: What types of drills, workouts, or cues are pitching coaches using to train pitchers for hip-shoulder separation and delayed shoulder (upper torso) rotation?


#7

I do believe that Nyman has velocity equated to about 50% arm action and 50% rotational efficiency.

As to how to develop this kind of separation, functional training plays a large part, specifically with the use of a medicine ball. Drills such as the one below help develop this kind of movement.

However, Nyman stresses that this kind of training is useless unless there is an intent and knowledge of how to properly position the body to perform the movement correctly.

As far as Dixon’s book goes, I own a copy and have found it informative but at the same time confusing. What is your interpretation of the “activated position”?