Changeup not enough of a change in speed?

I’m playing midget AA this year(only a first year midget) and my changeup, atleast in practice, seems to get devestated. Frankly I’m not sure how i’ve pitched in practice considering our practices have been sort of garbage, and we have a garbage team with a lot of kids who can’t do much, but a few who are pretty good, and I dunno if its just they can’t catch up with the fastball and the cahngeup is perfect speed for them to rip it, or I telegraph it too much. Should I just stick to using a choked up splitter(i seem to grip the ball wider in my hands so its a greater difference in speed than a fastball than a normal splitter), or grip the circle change harder?(I haven’t gotten to pitch enough to know if they just can’t catch up, and my control has been spotty so its hard to assess at this point.)

It is axiomatic in baseball, never throw a change to a weak hitter (Down in the order)…unless you want them bragging about hitting your fastball. We’re talkin about weak hitters here. Think about it. Do you throw your smoke past them? Well they can catch up to a change…and if they are weak hitters…well a straight pitch that is a little slower might be something to attempt a swing at…don’t ya think? It’s your own team so throw heat until they can hit it…if they never hit you…well sorry…soccer is always looking for recruits :wink: When and if they catch up to it…then they are set up for a nice change…until then it’s hi gas and sit down sonny 8)
Just because they are on your team doesn’t mean you have to get worse as a pitcher…create your own legend…(Man that rat 3&0 struck me out again…I’m gonna date his sister to get back at him man…:shock: )

Mr. Ellis played soccer didn’t he? :lol:

Yeah be careful with a change-up to bad kids. My cousin was pitching in the summer last year and every time he threw his changeup it got hit. I was like ok lets think here, these kids can’t catch you. DON’T THORW IT TO THEIR BAT SPEED. He kind of laughed but yet again if you need to work on a pitch you might have to throw it a little even if it gets hit in practice. Just don’t lose it is all.

[quote=“jdfromfla”]It is axiomatic in baseball, never throw a change to a weak hitter (Down in the order)…unless you want them bragging about hitting your fastball. We’re talkin about weak hitters here. Think about it. Do you throw your smoke past them? Well they can catch up to a change…and if they are weak hitters…well a straight pitch that is a little slower might be something to attempt a swing at…don’t ya think? It’s your own team so throw heat until they can hit it…if they never hit you…well sorry…soccer is always looking for recruits :wink: When and if they catch up to it…then they are set up for a nice change…until then it’s hi gas and sit down sonny 8)
Just because they are on your team doesn’t mean you have to get worse as a pitcher…create your own legend…(Man that rat 3&0 struck me out again…I’m gonna date his sister to get back at him man…:shock: )[/quote]
/glad my sisters are in there 20’s.
I guess i should just keep pluggin away with my fastball

Excellent post Mr. Bower! :hi:

One of the challenges of this craft of yours (pitching) is the learning curve that you’ll experience with your pitch selection and how good it is.

And it’s hard to excel at something when you don’t see positive results. But don’t give in to the easy way out. Your change-up/off-speed will get hit by slower bats in the order… and that’s a given. BUT, if you don’t use it you’ll never develop it.

Now I know what I just posted here comes as little comfrot when your getting the stuffings knocked out of you in the first three innings, but approach your problem in a slightly different way. Instead of pitching this off-speed/chnge-up right down the pike (middle), try this:

deliver a change-up on the outside corner, then follow the next pitch with your heater … again… on the outside corner.
This pitch is very effective to a hitter that holds his leading arm/elbow straight out and up… like it’s almost pointing directly at you. This batting posture has a very high attention span and finds it very difficult to hit the down and away pitch… fastball, change-up, slider… anything that’s down and away.

So, don’t give up on one of your bread-n butter pitches… the change-up.
Just use it a little smarter.

Coach B.

Well, thats the thing, ir eally want to develope my changeup because i’m a little guy, but blessed with some decent baseball genetics, and great athletic genetics, and I really wanna work my bread and butter pitches. My curveball is money now, just about every coach i’ve played against the last two years has commented on it, my splitter is iffy since I have a really tough time throwing it for a strike so its kind of in the under construction, and before I threw my circle change and it had great movement down and away from a lefty with good speed change, and I must of changed something over the winter months because its gone.
My fastballs are a little off since i change something everytime i throw almost, but ive only pitched a few times and it will get back under control.
I just wish i could get gunned again to see the difference in speed between my pitches.

One of the reasons for your curve ball working well is because … as you put it … YOUR A LITTLE GUY.

With respect to your curve ball and your height:::
The incoming flight path of your pitch tends to be flater than most… hence the look-see by the batter tends to either guess on waiting the pitch out … or swinging at what he/she thinks is worth taking a hack at. Depending on your age and level of competition, I would suggest going easy on the curve ball. Not that the curve is a bad pitch, but youngsters who don’t see a great deal of sucess with their other pitches tend to rely on the curve more than not … and the result is you become know as a guy that tosses junk … then a decent batting order will catch up to your curve because it… like you… is predictable.

Your heading in the right direction with your though process. That’s apparent here with your question. Just give yourself time.

By the way, an off-speed or change-up is an excellent pitch when used as a set-up pitch for something else. If you don’t have a pitching coach that can work with you on that subject … you most likely will as you get older.
And don’t be surpirsed if this coach tells you much of the same… as you were advise here.

I wish you the best in your baseball experience… your a thinking pitcher … which is an asset to ANY CLUB.

Coach B.

Also, I wanted to add … youngsters that are still growing… will notice changes in just about everything they do… baseball included.

Fact is, your changing daily… your body chemistry is changing, mood swings are not unusual, and spurts of ability come and go, sometimes toally unnoticed. But, a coaching staff that’s experiences and skilled in such areas of youth coaching understands this phase that EVERY youngster goes thourgh.

The only real problem … is getting you to be patient with the process. But we’ve all gone through it… yup… even me … (I think). :oops:

Coach B.

The patience is an issue, and i’m too hard on myself, which hurts me in just about everything.
Also, I am now 5 10 and a HALF :smiley:

One thing that could help you with your changeup is to drag your back foot when you throw it, that should help you to take some velocity off.

Draging the back leg might work for young kids but when you are older it’s not the thing to do and can be noticed because the wind-up slows down.

instead just loosen the grip or switch to a splitter for a change-up.

Mechanically keep everything the same with loose grip and arm make it look like a fastball same fastball mechanics.

You want to grip all of your pitches loosely for the most part, but dragging your back leg doesn’t affect your wind-up and is hard for the hitters to see when they are batting

When focusing on dragging the back leg it does slow you down and slows the release down.

The drag creates tension and you want no body part to be tight at all in the body when you pitch or you loose leverage and risk injury.

find a grip that works and keep working on it daily

We can agree to disagree

I can understand what you are saying and maybe you are right, but I was just saying what works for me, and gives me some late movement on my change

Ok well I’ve been taught differently.

Come to the chat room lol

Intentionally trying to drag the back foot is sure to mess up your mechanics and particularly your timing. It is only by introducing these flaws that it will take something off of a pitch. But these flaws may also increase your chances for injury so this is not a recommended strategy.

Pitchers with good mechanics still drag their back foot and it doesn’t really affect their velocity. For example, Nolan Ryan dragged his back foot yet he still threw 90+ mph.

If you need to take more off your change-up, alter your grip and/or use more pronation (but only to tolerance).

I’m thinking of trying a vulcan change out, see how it works, and if not, whatever.