Chang-Up


#1

What is the best way to teach a change up?
How do you hold it?
How hard do you throw it?

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#2

[quote=“youthcoach”]What is the best way to teach a change up?
How do you hold it?
How hard do you throw it?
[/quote]

A palmball is probably the easiest to teach a young player.
Five fingered grip with the ball seated in the palm.
You throw it as hard as the fastball. If you slow your arm down, you tip the pitch and it wont be effective.


#3

[quote=“kc86”][quote=“youthcoach”]What is the best way to teach a change up?
How do you hold it?
How hard do you throw it?
[/quote]

A palmball is probably the easiest to teach a young player.
Five fingered grip with the ball seated in the palm.
You throw it as hard as the fastball. If you slow your arm down, you tip the pitch and it wont be effective.[/quote]

Having all of the extra skin on the ball will slow it down and allow you to throw it with fastball mechanics.


#4

The palm ball grip is often taught to young kids because their hands are too small to use any other change-up grip (like the circle or “ok” grip). However, the palm ball is difficult to control so as kids get older they should migrate to other grips which will not only give them better control but also allow them to get movement on their change-up.


#5

Palmball and or a 3 or 4 finger just regular old changeup. I never felt comfortable holding the whole ball with my entire hand so i tried both of these when i was younger.


#6

[quote=“Roger”]…the palm ball is difficult to control…[/quote]Right on Roger. I teach them to simply throw with the middle two fingers, with the index and baby fingers to the sides of the ball with very little role. Then migrate to the circle as they develop. Throw it a lot in practice. Use this grip during long toss or just playing catch. Just throw it.


#7

I throw mine with my index and middle fingers touching and my ring not. Place them over the top edge of the horseshoe right next to the shoe. I get great change in speed and some downward movement and thats after 3 months with no change in arm speed (maybe throwing harder becuase of friction)


#8

The palm ball would be a good pitch for youngesters to learn. A pitcher for the padres , halliday, throws a palm ball and its very effective.

I have my own variation of a palm ball. I shove it on the back of my hand and then hold it there use my thumb. the rest of my fingers are up , not even touching the ball.it slides out high at first but in time it could be effective because releasing it this way gives the pitch a downward rotation allowing it to drop as it reaches the batter. essentially what you get is a breaking ball. but its still a change up. think of it as you’re holding the ball with your thumb and waving at the batter as you pitch. (dont worry ive asked my catcher , and batter if they see the fingers and they says no)


#9

[quote=“GottyJ”]The palm ball would be a good pitch for youngesters to learn. A pitcher for the padres , halliday, throws a palm ball and its very effective.

I have my own variation of a palm ball. I shove it on the back of my hand and then hold it there use my thumb. the rest of my fingers are up , not even touching the ball.it slides out high at first but in time it could be effective because releasing it this way gives the pitch a downward rotation allowing it to drop as it reaches the batter. essentially what you get is a breaking ball. but its still a change up. think of it as you’re holding the ball with your thumb and waving at the batter as you pitch. (dont worry ive asked my catcher , and batter if they see the fingers and they says no)[/quote]

That second part sounds like mine except I only have 3 fingers up


#10

it does doesnt it hehehe. I think these 2 types of pitches take time to develope in terms of control and drop. because when i first started throwing it it had little drop and i had no control with it. as i kept practicing the control and drop increased.


#11

same. I’m tall for my age 13 years and 6 days and 5’8 (or about 5’ 8"1/2) and I had trouble bringing in my arm by my ear instead of above my head, so I would leave it up in the zone


#12

for me since i had no fingers on it.my problem was it just slidng off and sailing far , far above the catchter


#13

Just got back from a Baseball clinic
In order to help keep change up low in zone and help take speed off a pitcher will drag the back toe to help…


#14

[quote=“slugger60”]Just got back from a Baseball clinic
In order to help keep change up low in zone and help take speed off a pitcher will drag the back toe to help…[/quote]
I hate to say it but I think that is some old “conventional wisdom” that just isn’t correct.

First, the best pitchers in the big leagues all drag their back toe until after the ball is released regardless of which pitch is thrown. It doesn’t seem to take anything off their fastball.

Second, keeping the back foot on the ground will have the effect of keeping the torso more upright. How does that help you keep the ball down?

Finally, you don’t want to do anything that the batter’s eye can detect because as soon as he detects something different - even if he is not sure what it is - he will immediately expect an off-speed pitch.

If you want to take something off your change-up, you need to alter your hand position and/or grip. The more you pronate your hand/wrist, the more you’ll take something off. Taking the stronger fingers off the ball and putting the weaker fingers on the ball will also take something off. But the pronation will also help you get some movement on your change-up.

Make sure to throw your change-up with the same arm speed, same arm slot, and same release point as your fastball and you’ll better deceive the batter. The success of the change-up depends on deception.


#15

According to Steven Ellis in article How to throw a great change up:

qoute " One way to take off speed is to shorten stride and collaspe the back side. When I say collaspe on your backside I 'm talking about reducing the back side leg action."

How to Throw a Great Change upFree professional baseball pitching instruction, information, tips and articles on pitching mechanics, pitching grips, pitching drills, pitching workouts, …
www.thecompletepitcher.com/pitching_article-43.htm

According to old vertern college pitching coach drag the toe.

One thing is for certain in baseball whether you are hitting or pitching the game is nothing more than adjustments. On any given day depending on the type of mound, type of umpire and how your wrist and fingers are acting a pitcher will have to adjust in order to find a way to win.


#16

Why would you want to alter your mechanics to throw a different pitch? Why try to get good at multiple mechanical sequences when you could be trying to get good at just one? Sounds like a recipe for inconsistency.

If you’re concentrating on dragging your back toe, you’re not concentrating on what you should be concentrating on.


#17

agreed , I say if you want to make a good change up . come up with the solution yourself.You already know the basics. a change up is meant to look exactly like a fastball in terms of mechanics and arm speed.The pitch itself once released is slower which throws off the batters timing. Now ask youself :“what can i change about my grip that will take off velocity and not effect my arm speed or overall mechanics”

when you come up with your own solution that works for you. You gain your own unique change up (or at the very least you have a change up)


#18

Making each pitch look the same and learning one muscle memory syncronization is the key to consitant pitching…

however, dragging a toe may be the old convential wisdom that is needed to help a pitcher make an adjustment out on the mound when just griping it correctly ain’t working on a particular day.

Just like a catcher touching the ground with his glove is a cue to kep the ball down. Baseball is a game of adjustments and some days you have to move your grip a little or adjust your stride a little to help you achieve a desired speed, movement, or location.