Cant keep my curveball down


#1

I keep leaving my curveball high in the strikezone. How do I get it down below the strikezone?


#2

I have somewhat of the same problem. I have corrected this problem by trying to break your wrist and release the ball later than you normally do. I have trouble with my curveball to. Out of all my pitches it’s my worst sadly…I throw an excellente 2-seamer and knuckleball. Probably because I have been throwing them my whole life. I have been throwing a curve for about a 1yr now and I’m progressing steadlily. I tend to want to break my hand a little past my head, thus leaving my curveball high-not good!! And when I break a little later out in front of me and let the ball roll out of my hands it is like Barry Zito…lol…Well not exactly…but…It is a good curveball…nice looking.

My point is don’t try to snap the ball out of your hand but snap your wrist and let it roll out. The snap is just to get the ball rolling in that direction. But I guess I just have to break myself of a habit of breaking my hand to early. Sounds to me like that may be your problem too.

Well good luck and if you find any tips out let me know…please…

WhiteSox101 :slight_smile:


#3

Can’t say for sure without seeing you but speaking in general…

Any mechanical flaw that pulls your release point back and raises it up can cause your curve to hang (either because you throw it high or you don’t get enough spin - or both). For example, a late posture change or early shoulder rotation can cause this.

Throwing the curve with the same release point and arm speed as your fastball should bring it down and give it a good break. So, your mechanics need to be especially good when throwing your curve to allow these things to happen.


#4

Yeah I think you are right. My curveball is usually chest high 50% of the time. The other 50% it is normal. It really used to be worse. Also my curveball doesn’t get as much movement when thrown high. When I get mine to break really good when it is knee high or lower. That’s where I want to be able to put mine. I don’t have great command to hit spots with it but I can hit the zone. Just not spots. I’m working on it and I will be ready to go by spring. I just know it. I practice every other day throwing all my pitches equally. For me I have noticed there is a trick to every pitch. Once you learn it and apply it you have a great pitch. That’s how I am with my other two that got me to varsity pitching last year. My knuckleball, that my coach actually doesn’t mind me throwing and my 2-seamer. I need this pitch though. Any tips that are in general would be nice I know for both of us. I am looking foward to improvement. I throw an 81-82mph 2-seamer, so what should my curveball speed be? I’m throwing it at 62-63mph.


#5

The curve will generally be your slowest pitch. But I wouldn’t worry about the speed. Work on throwing it with the same release point and arm speed as your fastball and you’ll get it to break well. Keeping the arm speed up may also cause it to break a little bit later. Late movement is a good thing.

Remember, to throw it with the same release point, your mechanics and timing needs to be the same. Release point is a result of your mechanics.


#6

Alright thanks Roger. I’m going to be throwing tomorrow so I’ll definatly keep in mind the tips you gave me. And as for the curveball being the slowest that is true for most. My knuckleball runs only 55-58mph. But I get the point. Thank you very much!


#7

RedSox,
If you are throwing a 12-6 curve or somewhere around that then throwing it a bit faster will usually result in a tighter break. You’ll have to adjust your release point to get the ball down into the zone.

The other option is to go the other way which is to maintain the release point and slow it down a bit allowing it to drop more.

It depends a lot on how you are missing. If whenever you try to adjust for it staying high you end up throwing it in the dirt then I’d say try throwing it a bit faster which should make it easier to control.

If you always miss high then it is probably more of a mechanics issue like Roger suggested and I’d either try slowing it down or working on a change in the mechanics. Usually if you go to a good pitching coach they’ll be able to help you pretty quickly. There really isn’t much we can do over the internet.


#8

Is it breaking as much as it normally does?


#9

it acts more like a slider


#10

Funny you say that. Mine seemly was to. I was throwing it as a knuckle curve. I changed my grip to Barry Zito’s and I have better results. Try to let the ball roll out of your hand . Rather than twist it out. Rolling it will give it more drop. Hard to do but play around with it and you will see what I mean.


#11

Make sure you’re not pulling your head out to the side when you throw the curve. Every now and then my curve will start to get flat because I’ll subconsciously try to pull with my head.


#12

Exactly. As I explained above, any mechanical flaw that changes your release point can mess up your movement. Pulling your head is a posture change that will pull the release point back and possibly up and/or to the side.