Can keeping your weight back cause problems?

I’ve seen one of the topics down below explaining that they had a sore lower back. I am beginning to have the same thing. I admit that it might be the cause of my two or three months gone without throwing. But all the same, I was reading through some blogs and noticed one explaining how Roger Clemens leads with his hips. And so, I focused on keeping my weight back until my foot touched the floor and released. I was, infact, using “Strike Out Stripz” (
http://www.learn2pitch.com/
). The good thing is that I felt absolutely no pain in my arm through the wind-up or stretch which I figured was a good thing since I assumed that that meant I was leading with my hips and using a strong base, not throwing with just my arm, but also the legs, hips, and core. But, as I said, my back hurts. Is there something I could be doing incorrectly?

Keeping the head and shoulders behind the front hip into foot plant is good. Keeping total body weight back isn’t. So, whether “keeping your weight back” can cause problems depends on what you really mean or what you’re really doing.

Where in your back is the pain?

From what I can tell, the focal point for the pain is right in the lower back on both sides of the back bone. In professional terms, if you need me to be more specific, it’s the Latissium Dorsi.

Not feeling pain in your arm isn’t a guarantee you’re leading with the front hip. And having pain in your low back isn’t a guarantee you’re doing something wrong - you could be doing things right but it’s just that you’re now using muscles you didn’t use before or you’re using them more now than you did before. Tough to say without seeing you.

Well, another factor that I think might play a role in this problem is that I’m not using a mound. Rather, I’m on flat ground which means that I’m down falling at a downward angle. Could that have some emphasis on anything? I know you’re no doctor like you’ve said, but I do appreciate the help. I will go ahead and get a YouTube account and post videos both with my normal mechanics and the mechanics where I try to keep more of my weight back to explode.

Edit: Here is the video. The first dry throw with a light weight baseball in hand is with my normal mechanics. The second is slightly slower I thought because I had to keep the weight back. My back is still a little stiff, but it didn’t both me since I only did it once or twice this time around of course.

[quote=“Leonheart21”]Well, another factor that I think might play a role in this problem is that I’m not using a mound. Rather, I’m on flat ground which means that I’m down falling at a downward angle. Could that have some emphasis on anything? I know you’re no doctor like you’ve said, but I do appreciate the help. I will go ahead and get a YouTube account and post videos both with my normal mechanics and the mechanics where I try to keep more of my weight back to explode.

Edit: Here is the video. The first dry throw with a light weight baseball in hand is with my normal mechanics. The second is slightly slower I thought because I had to keep the weight back. My back is still a little stiff, but it didn’t both me since I only did it once or twice this time around of course.[/quote]

There’s no video on here, but that isn’t what I’m worried about right now. It should less stressful to throw off of flat-ground for one major reason. When you stride down a mound, you land with a force anywhere around 3 to 4 times your body weight. On flat-ground it’s more like 1.5 times your body weight. I’d like to see a video to see what’s actually going on.

My mistake there :lol: I did practice in the basement where I was worried about hitting something with the straps so I tried to make sure that I didn’t hit anything so I may have shortened some things, but not my stride.

I really don’t see anything out of the ordinary. Clearly, and as you said, you weren’t going at full speed/intensity. I wouldn’t think you’d hurt your back doing what you showed in the video. Maybe you do something different when going full speed?

Regarding the mound vs. flat ground. Your backside generally works to decelerate your body when moving forward. On a mound, gravity pushes you downhill faster so the decelerators have to work harder. Throwing on flat ground is easier on the decelerators. In fact, I would suggest limiting all of your throwing to flat ground until your back is better. That is, if you continue to throw at all while your back is sore.

Ultimately, if you back off on the throwing but your back doesn’t get better, you should go get checked out by a doctor.

One mechanical problem I see from your clip that could be your problem is that you do not flex your right knee just prior to delivering the pitch. After you get to the top of your windup and put your weight over your post foot think of “sitting” on your right leg as you start dowm the hill. This should automatically keep your weight back, and as you start down the hill you will find you will lead with the left hip.

That is a good observation. I’ll make sure to work on that from now on. Guess I’m not one of those pitchers considered best for “stand tall then fall” like Ryan. :lol: Thank you for all of your help, Roger, Nick, and NPA.