Can a 30 yr old, untrained arm hit 80 mph?


#1

I realize this might not be the right place for this question, but I ask because my colleagues at work say not a chance and I wanted to get some educated feedback.

The topic came up when I made the comment that someone with only high school ball experience and above average arm strength, with a few months of training, could hit 80 mph at age 30. How unreasonable is this?


#2

Why not? I think that it is more than possible. Jim Morris was 35years old when he became a major league baseball pitcher and he threw 98mph. Anything is possible.


#3

pitchers come off tommy john surgery throwing back, even better than, to what they did before.

As long as you put in the work towards attaining that goal, you should be able to reach 80.

People say genetics are a person’s ceiling, which I agree with. I think a lot of people don’t go all out 100% to see what that ceiling is, some don’t even get good training or have a good foundation to reach their full potential.

Some gains are signifigant, esp if you were throwing all arm (had bad mechanics) and found somebody who taught you how to use your legs/hips. Then some are a patience game, where it would take you anywhere from 3-6 months of work to see a 2-3 mph increase. Increasing mph is gained through smart training, determination, patience and dedication. Just because you dedicate a year to working toward your goal and don’t reach it, doesn’t mean you can never reach it, you never know what could be gained the next year.

But then when you get to the point where you throw hard, you’ll quickly learn that throwing hard isn’t what it’s all about. It turns into locating pitches, having good breaking stuff and staying healthy. Getting good hitters out.

Sorry I go off way into this stuff, I have ADD lol So in short, yes. :lol:


#4

By all means! If you keep at it, you might even be able to hit 85-90.
I remember, many moons ago, when I was a confirmed snake-jazz pitcher, not much on speed but with an extensive arsenal of breaking stuff and the control and command to go with it. One day I was warming up prior to starting a game, and suddenly, without realizing it, I threw a pitch that was faster than usual; my top speed had always been 76 or so, and this one—well, I threw a few more, and I realized it was not a fluke. When I called my catcher out to the mound where I was warming up, he said he’d noticed it and did I want to try it in a game? I said sure, and I did use it in the game, and the opposing batters couldn’t do a thing with it.
A few days later I was talking to my pitching coach—an active major-league pitcher—and I told him about this. He ran into the Yankees’ clubhouse, got a catcher’s mitt and a stopwatch, and told me to throw some nine or ten pitches like that because he was going to time it. I did so, and then he surprised me with “I’ve got news for you! You have a fast ball!” He had timed me at 81 miles an hour, and he said that for a finesse pitcher such as I was, this was a fast ball. It was a good four-seamer with a lot of movement on it, and he told me that this was a good pitch and I should use it.
So. If you keep up the good work, as you apparently have been doing, I see no reason why you shouldn’t hit 80 or even faster within the period of time you describe. :slight_smile: 8)


#5

I generally believe that just about any player who exhibits a bit of athleticism (even with little formal pitching training) can hit 80-83 mph. So yes, in your case, with some work, you probably could in about 8 weeks if you were starting from scratch and really had the time and dedication to do it.


#6

I think it’s certainly possible. Especially if the 30 year old in question is an athletic person.

I’ve never been one to really burn a hole in someone’s mitt but I’ll tell you what my goal for this spring is to throw about 80 as well, I’ve been floating all around the 70s for a long time and now that I really am a pitcher I want to work a lot on it, I was always someone who wanted to pitch but never did got to in a game until last season.

For a knuckleballer I guess upper 70s is okay but I really want to get to the 80s.


#7

Oh yeah, definitely possible.


#8

With every gain, there is something to be given up. To get, you must sacrifice. Is the price worth it? Do you want it bad enough to answer that question with your own sweat and the duration of sacrifice?

I’ve coach men well into their 30’s, and the time and loneliness that must addressed is no joke, nor is it a compliment to any kind of social life.

You will progress slowly and painfully. You will address new walls of discomfort, inertia that will test your commitment, and appreciation to what you’ve accomplished that no one will share with you - but with that of your own silence and deepest of inner thoughts.

Solitude and the constant little battles with an aging structure, not suitable to the slightest miscalculation along the way.

If this sounds like something that you want, and want badly, post your acknowledgement here and I’ll suggest a pre-training plan for you. I have experience in this area.

By the way, if you’re planning to compete with a MSBL league, this kind of velocity is not really necessary to hold down a roster spot with. Not that you should overlook it all together, but just look at the realities.

Coach B.


#9

Thanks for all of the feedback and encouragement. I am going to pursue this for two reasons. I have always had a passion for pitching but have only pitched sparingly many, many years ago. This challenge will give me a reason to toe the rubber again.

The second is because I am super competitive and can’t let it go when people tell me I can’t do something.

It should be interesting as I really don’t have a lot of extra time and will primarily be working out in my basement. I haven’t figured out yet where I am going to throw to prepare since the weather isn’t the best right now (I live in Ohio). I’ll be checking in frequently for advice and to grab some info.


#10

[quote=“n8skiver”]Thanks for all of the feedback and encouragement. I am going to pursue this for two reasons. I have always had a passion for pitching but have only pitched sparingly many, many years ago. This challenge will give me a reason to toe the rubber again.

The second is because I am super competitive and can’t let it go when people tell me I can’t do something.

It should be interesting as I really don’t have a lot of extra time and will primarily be working out in my basement. I haven’t figured out yet where I am going to throw to prepare since the weather isn’t the best right now (I live in Ohio). I’ll be checking in frequently for advice and to grab some info.[/quote]

Best of luck, show us what you’re working with with a video sometime and we’ll be more then happy to help improve your mechanics and provide you with exercises. I’m just throwing this out there, but I have a feeling if you’re say 5’11 or taller, and just mildly athletic that you’ll be able to do 80mph relatively easy. Just a guess though, only time will tell.


#11

Being super competitive is like having a bad temper - if you don’t control it, it will control you.

(1.) Make an appointment to get a complete physical. Pay particular attention to your heart, back, groin and both knees. Any past history of spine, hernia, shortness of breath, ankle and knee problems should be addressed by your physician… not a nurse practitioner or physician’s assistant.
(2.) Get an accurate reading on your body fat content (index). Incorporate this with your pre-training itinerary. Pre-training means before you get into the full swing of exercises and practice pitching sessions.
(3.) Use that competitive nature of yours to set aside time and space for regular attention to diet, rest, hydration, weight management, and acquire a blood pressure cuff, a simple bathroom scale and a thermometer for taking your body temperature. The proper blood pressure readings – before and after every workout, your body weight for your size and age, and keep track of your temperature before and after workout is important. Again, your physician has guidelines for this.
(4.) Invest in about six (6) large bath towels and a terrycloth bathrobe.
After every workout you’ll want to hot shower, wrap your shoulders and back with a warm damp towel, then cover up with a terrycloth bathrobe. Let the damp, moist warm heat penetrate the shoulders and back, to include the lower back.
(5) Invest in a good supply of liniment - Absorbine Jr is a good one. Rub yourself down on the shoulders, then have someone rubdown your back. Do not allow any liniment to get under your arms, or face, or groin.
(6.) Now take the most important NEXT step in your intent to accomplish your goal…
[size=18]
GET TUFF CUFF.
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This is one of the finest publications of its kind, specifically written and published to guide competitors like yourself. I recommend this publication very highly. In it, you will find chapter by chapter, everything that you wanted to know about pitching development, sustained health and endurance, charts and graphs that are easy to follow and understand.

Go to the top information bar of this web site, and you’ll find in bold block letters:
DISCUSSION FORMS …etc,…

Click on ORDER and read about the benefits of this publication.

This book will bring you into the world of professional management of developing pitchers. Any closer to the ranks of professional coaching and you’d be paying a bundle.

In closing,… , you’re about to give up a lot of time and space for this. You’re going to be pushing other things out of your life to make room for this one goal. When done with the serious intent that you seem to express here, something gotta give. Just be aware of this fact. So, if your going to work hard at this … work hard at this. Just prepare your friends, family, and those around you that are accustomed to seeing you on a regular basis of some changes on the horizon. It’s gonna happen.

I sincerely wish you the best with your baseball experience.

Coach B.


#12

Totally have seen weirder things happen. Good luck boss.


#13

Thanks for the info Coach B. I actually just had a check up with my physician and am quite familiar with how my body reacts to weight lifting and cardio based on past experience, but the baseball specific part is where I will need to learn and plan.

I appreciate the suggestion and will check out Tuff Stuff.