Breaking in a new mit


#1

well i am looking advice for the best way to break in a new mit. Today i just purchased a 189 dollar a2000 catchers mitt, and would like to no the fastest way to break it in becasue tryouts are coming up quick and my old mitt just doest sqeeze the ball anymore and has no padding


#2

catch as many pitchers as you can before tryouts


#3

There’s no such thing as a fast way to break in a catcher’s mitt. It needs to get beaten by fastballs.

Do NOT try any mythical methods that people have tried over the years — for example, soaking in water, baking, microwaving, using “glove oil”, shaving cream, etc. — unless you don’t care about the longevity of the glove.

You can try using some neats foot oil or pure lanolin to help soften the leather, but don’t use too much or the glove will get too heavy. Since true neats foot oil or lanolin are next to impossible to locate, I use Lexol leather conditioner. You can get it from a shoeshine shop or online.

For future reference, always have two gloves if you are a catcher — one for “game” use and one you’re breaking in for next year’s game use. I know it’s expensive but it’s one of the prices you pay as a catcher.

Also, I love the Akadema Praying Mantis catcher’s glove, mainly because the thumb pad has a break in it that 1. creates a larger natural pocket and 2. prevents thumb injuries. So you might want to check it out the next time you’re buying.


#4

what about any leather softeners because i did go to a specific basbeall store to get it and the guy said to use a leather softener some expensive one they had it was like 20 bucks for it


#5

I can’t say, because the only leather softeners I used were called “saddle soap”, “neats foot oil”, “mink oil”, and other types of oils … and all made the glove heavy and in some cases too floppy.

What is the brand and exact name of the softener?


#6

its like NOKOMA then next to that it say NLT classic golve conditioner


#7

Oh and as much as i would like to wait to use it in games im gonna have to because there is a kid on the team who’s throwing about 84 and the mit i had last year has no padding left. I tried getting a new mit last year i just never got around to it. BUt luckly this a2000 i got is acctually sqeeze able i am able to hold the ball


#8

[quote=“shhsbaseball09”]well i am looking advice for the best way to break in a new mit. Today i just purchased a 189 dollar a2000 catchers mitt, and would like to no the fastest way to break it in becasue tryouts are coming up quick and my old mitt just doest sqeeze the ball anymore and has no padding[/quote]Oil it a lot and play catch or be throwing a ball into it as much as you can. I remember with my old A2000 i used to put it under my pillow and that worked pretty good. Now with my new Mizuno, I have only played catch with it and oiled it a lot, that has worked very good for me. I got my Mizuno and was using it 3 days later at a college workout/camp.


#9

I’m not familiar with it. However if it’s made by Nokona, I’d pass on it and look for something made by a company that specializes and focuses on leather conditioning products. Nokona is a glove company and glove companies generally aren’t motivated to prolong the use of your glove.

That’s why I suggest Lexol – they are in the business of keeping your leather long-lasting - be it a baseball glove, a leather jacket, boot, auto upholstery, etc…

But again, if you don’t care too much about the longevity of your glove (i.e., if you plan to buy a new one in a year or so), then any glove oil should be OK for getting the mitt ready in a short amount of time. Just don’t overdo it with the oil – it’s like adding salt to a meal: you can always add more, but you can’t take it out.


#10

I’ve broken in a first basemen’s mitt and an infield glove by getting a quality glove oil with lanolin and putting a drop on my thumb, then massaging that into the area(s) of the glove that you want to bend. Massage that in there slowly but consistently to allow the leather to absorb it. Use it sparingly, though.

Then take that mitt out to the local batting cage and catch hardballs off the pitching machine for a couple of buckets worth. The faster the ball the better. If you or a friend, or maybe your school, has a pitching machine you can save time and money by using it instead of going to the cage. The benefits are twofold: You are getting lots of hard-thrown balls into the mitt, and you can do it for a long period of time standing up, without kneeling as you do when receiving BP. Saves time and knees. :wink:

Repeat this two or three times, but leave the mitt somewhat stiff. If you use too much oil it will get too broken, and your perfect game mitt will turn into a floppy hand-saddle.