Bowflex?

I was wondering if anyone here has a bowflex that they use for working out…I heard that you can strengthen your rotator cuff, wrists and every other muscle pitchers use in their delivery.

if anybody has one i’d like their opinion (i might get one).

Free weights…

Cheaper and better for training anyhow.

The advantage to a bowflex would be it’s “footprint” but I mean you can have a freeweight setup in about a 7 x 5 block.

[quote]The advantage to a bowflex would be it’s “footprint”
[/quote]

footprint :?:???

Its better than nothing, but still free weights are better.

Free weights better allow for a full range of natural motion. With machines, such as the bowflex, you’re “locked” into the movement of the machine. It’s always better to train with free weights.

As for the bowflex, you’d probably be better off doing sprintwork, lightweight dumbbells and bodyweight and/or medicine ball exercises to improve your pitching. You’d save $$, and it’s a better workout. Check out the Pitching Workouts section for some workout tips.

freeweights are a lot better but the bowflex if a good workout, my friend has one

Take it from me, I have one and rarely ever use it anymore. I’ve done pretty much exactly what Steve has said, and supplement it with a gym membership for the bike and lower body machines. Not only it the bowflex a complete pain to “switch” exercises, but when you get into lower body stuff it can be a little light on the weight as well. I wish I would have forgone the bowflex and just spent the same money getting a gym membership and picking up the free weights and other accessories for home.

buy a gym membership and wear out the squat and smith machine (use this one properly. you can also use the leg curl/extension and hip machines. during season we are doing legs/back - forearms/chest - core (hips/abs/shoulders) on (2) three day rotations with one day off per week. we adjust for how we feel and the intensity of the high school practice/game schedule.

the big leaguers head straight to the gym to lift after a game.

[quote=“dusty delso”]buy a gym membership and wear out the squat and smith machine (use this one properly. you can also use the leg curl/extension and hip machines. during season we are doing legs/back - forearms/chest - core (hips/abs/shoulders) on (2) three day rotations with one day off per week. we adjust for how we feel and the intensity of the high school practice/game schedule.

the big leaguers head straight to the gym to lift after a game.[/quote]

Ew smith machines. They don’t allow the range of movement needed for squats, deadlifts, etc in my opinion.

not supposed to, they are targeting a different muscle group. we are talking about the squat bar on the cables you use at an angle.

also squats should ideally be performed with the weight remaining on the heels, not on the balls of the feet.

I’ve used an angled one and the only thing it does is allow me to put on more weight and impress the ladies. The angled ones are an improvement over the straight ones but I’d still prefer free squats.

I summon KC86

From T-Nation article:

[quote]What’s wrong with the Smith? First, there’s zero functional transfer to real life, sports or other lifts. It develops strength in only one dimension, predisposing you to injury in the undeveloped planes of movement. This is sometimes called pattern overload syndrome, and it can lead to medical bills in the long run.

Second, because the bar is fixed, a person doing Smith machine squats is able to lean against the bar, which is a natural response. This minimizes hip extension, thus allowing the hamstrings to take a siesta during the movement. Trouble is, the hamstrings help to stabilize the knee during squats, and the result of taking them out of the picture is to induce a shearing force on the joint. This might ultimately lead to a blown anterior cruciate ligament. Using the Smith machine for all your squatting definitely leads to you being a big fat dork. [/quote]

Honestly, I dont really see the purpose for doing anything with a Smith machine. The original purpose was to lower the rate of injuries, but generally you will see more physical problems being created by the Smith than by regular barball squatting. The machine actually makes it difficult to perform full squats, leading to more half squat/quarter squat abominations that make the gods of strength and power angry. Additionally, it is difficult to say that one angle is going to be correct for everyone, because small variations in anatomy will cause different bar paths (and other things).

So, without any real benefits compared to a normal barbell squat why do people still use the Smith? I think it has a lot to do with false perception of one being easier and safer, which truly has no basis in reality. A good strength coach should be able to teach safe squatting form within a week. In addition you will see improvements in ligament strength from switching to full squats as compared to the half or quarter variety. Goblet squats are another good alternative to the Smith.

As far as deadlifting in a Smith machine… don’t.

roger clemens workout includes squatting with the smith machine. whenever they show him on espn working out hes using it.

It’s like fast food versus healthy food. The smith machine is tasty but not healthy in the long run while healthy food is not tasty at first but is healthy in the long run and you learn to believe it is tasty!