Best way to recuperate from a pitching session


#1

I was wondering, what is the best way to recuperate (other than time) after a pitching session. I’m a freshman pitcher on a team of seniors and want to impress my coach by pitching at full strength at least twice a week (I don’t know if this is possible). If you have any tips (stretches, warm-ups, diet) it would be great.
thanks


#2

Good diet, 2 advil, some running, and cuff work should do the trick.


#3

Personally, I wouldn’t encourage using Advil or similar medicine on a regular basis.

Also, I would emphasize the running a bit more than Hammer and suggest daily running.


#4

Personally, I wouldn’t encourage using Advil or similar medicine on a regular basis.

Also, I would emphasize the running a bit more than Hammer and suggest daily running.[/quote]
I agree with Roger. Running is a pitcher’s best friend.


#5

Personally, I wouldn’t encourage using Advil or similar medicine on a regular basis.

Also, I would emphasize the running a bit more than Hammer and suggest daily running.[/quote]
I agree with Roger. Running is a pitcher’s best friend.[/quote]

I can only assume you mean short (200M or less) sprints, otherwise I completely disagree with you


#6

Personally, I wouldn’t encourage using Advil or similar medicine on a regular basis.

Also, I would emphasize the running a bit more than Hammer and suggest daily running.[/quote]
I agree with Roger. Running is a pitcher’s best friend.[/quote]

I can only assume you mean short (200M or less) sprints, otherwise I completely disagree with you[/quote]
Both. Long distance is great after you pitch. It helps get rid of the lactic acid build up. Are you saying that long distance running is bad for a pitcher?


#7

Lactic acid has nothing to do with anything. That is an old myth that I hope one day gets thrown under the bus. Its the constant stress of throwing that makes you sore the next day, not lactic acid. The hard planting of the front foot, the amazing rotation of the hips and torso, and the arm whip, that causes all the soreness. Lactic acid doesnt even play a role, because throwing a baseball or playing baseball for that matter never even taps into that energy system that causes lactic acid to build up. If you want to feel what lactic acid feels like go and run the 400 meter as fast as you can. While I agree some what with Lanky, running sprints all the time could wear a pitcher down come the end of season. You should run sprints and you need to, but after a game I suggest a good leg workout the next day and alot of mobility circuits. Since the season can be long and mobility and flexibility work gets looked over alot I suggest that. The mobility circuits will get the blood flowing, work on mobility imbalances and its low impact so its not going to over stress the body. Long distance running though is garbage, I would agree with lanky and say 2-300 meter runs are max distance I would ever want to run.


#8

Lanky, you run sprints for recovery?


#9

Daily running is what I suggested when I said running. I’m just not an overboard on running type of guy. You can’t run the ball across the plate!

However, there isn’t anything wrong with taking a couple advil once in awhile. You go see a doctor for arm soreness, more than likely they will put you on some sort of reliever, and they will make it a consistent plan for several days.

Could you explain these mobility circuits a little better Chad? I’m curious to try these.


#10

After a pitching in a game our coach usually makes the guys who pitched do some poles. a quarter of the way job doing a pedaling motion with the arms then sprint a qrt then jog with the same pedaling action then sprint. im not sure if he makes us do it cuz he believes in the lactid acid stuff, but our arms usually feel better the next day. We also have this long rubber bar thing i forget what its called but you shake it with your wrist and raise your arm up and it vibrates through your arm and that feels good.


#11

Well theres a place for both High Intensity sprints and Long distance in my opinion… Long distance certainly isn’t garbage. I always jog 20-30 minutes the day after I pitch, I’ve found its a good way to loosen up and get some blood flowing. I actually don’t usually do straight sprints, if I’m going to do HIT, then I do interval work for 15-20 minutes (i.e. 2 Minutes Jog @ 8:00 Pace, 1 Minute Sprint @ 5 Minute Pace, repeated 5-8 times)

Theres a place for both, neither is the magic bullet, but both can be used beneficially. I would totally disagree with Chad that long distance is garbage, if for no other reason than its good for your heart lol.


#12

Fstbllthrwer the problem with long distance running is the principle of specificity. If you want to get better at your sport you have to train as specific as possible. You dont train power production. There are alot better ways to get the blood flowing and loosening up the joints and body. Your also not loosening up your body you are making it tighter. At no point do you get to extend the hip to its fullest with long distance running. So it restricts hip mobility which is something you dont want to do with your front side leg beacuse it already his shorter and tighter than your right hip from landing all the time when throwing. Also by sprinting there has been studies to show that leg power goes up through out the season by sprinting compared to long distance running.

Most peoples gait or foot pattern is thrown off by heel striking when long distance running. Heel striking is not proper foot function when running. Walking its ok, but sprinting you land on the balls of your feet which is proper foot gait. So there again you throw off foot function and restrict foot function. Which means your knee has to take all the landing forces from long distance running. When you restrict a joint it messes with another up the kinetic chain. Some people have fixed shoulder issuse by mobilizing there foot so why restrict foot function. We already restrict it enough by putting our feet in shoes.

Also you dont get your full arm swing when distance running so you dont get your shoulders full range of motion so your restricting it there.

Hopefully that clears up why I chose sprints over long distance running. Also people most people never reach overtraining, so actually I might consider sprints after throwing. I would do sprints in the form of build-ups. Starting out slow and building up to speed towards the end of the sprint. That way your not giving max effort but still extendind the ankle knee and hip properly.


#13

I would like to find out what type of foods would be good for after pitching or after work outs. Fruits veggies smoothies??


#14

When working out your muscles, you are stretching and tearing the small fibers in your muscles. For this reason you are sore. The more you pitch, the more you are stretching and tearing these fibers. Working out with weights leaves no doubt you are tearing these fibers. There are two things that are critical for the muscle to repair itself, water and protein. Therefore, drinking a protein shake to aid in the recovery process is the best option and generally a good idea.