Beginner pitching

Im 18 years old and I Just started playing baseball in may. I played in a Rec league over the summer and I loved it. I have been working alot on my pitching and Hitting ever since I got into baseball. Im a outfielder and Have no experience pitching in an actual game. I can currently throw 3 pitches(4 seam fast ball, 2 seam fast ball and curve ball). In these videos im throwing 4 seam fastballs and curve balls. Please let me know what you think I need to work on and how I can improve.


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Advice anybody? :?: :?:

Take special note of your glove arm. When you initially break your hands, your glove arm does extend a bit, but then you bring it down to your knees, then you let it flop - low, by your side.

Instead…
Break your hands, bring your glove arm out towards your target - keep it there as you progress forward … then bring your chest to your glove, then commit to delivering the ball. Allow you glove hand to rest on the rig cage of your glove side during the release of the ball.(pitch)

I know this media isn’t a substitute for hands on coaching right there with you - but, try this in steps … a little at a time. You’ll notice a smoother delivery once you get the awkwardness worked out.

But overall, for a man who hasn’t pitched before - you have very good athletic ability, very good. You also look in good physical condition to.

Try this out and then post some more video if you can. First timers need to take it slow and easy in the beginning - don’t want to get into an overload.

Coach B.

Make sure you front toe is pointing directly at the target, you land slightly closed.

Coach Baker addressed the glove side so I won’t comment on that.

Also…

When you go into knee lift, your center of gravity moves back toward 2B before moving forward. Your stride is also short. I suggest getting your hips moving forward sooner and leading with your front hip longer into your stride.

I’d also suggest keeping your head upright.

[quote=“Coach Baker”]Take special note of your glove arm. When you initially break your hands, your glove arm does extend a bit, but then you bring it down to your knees, then you let it flop - low, by your side.

Instead…
Break your hands, bring your glove arm out towards your target - keep it there as you progress forward … then bring your chest to your glove, then commit to delivering the ball. Allow you glove hand to rest on the rig cage of your glove side during the release of the ball.(pitch)

I know this media isn’t a substitute for hands on coaching right there with you - but, try this in steps … a little at a time. You’ll notice a smoother delivery once you get the awkwardness worked out.

But overall, for a man who hasn’t pitched before - you have very good athletic ability, very good. You also look in good physical condition to.

Try this out and then post some more video if you can. First timers need to take it slow and easy in the beginning - don’t want to get into an overload.

Coach B.[/quote]Ok sounds good, I will be working on bringing my glove to the rib cage. I will be taking it slow and going through the motion in my free time aswell. Thank you I appreciate it.

if you will lengthen your stride to at least 90% of your height, it will work wonders. you can tell you love to pitch. keep after it.

Your stride should be 110% of your height.

[quote=“dusty delso”]if you will lengthen your stride to at least 90% of your height, it will work wonders. you can tell you love to pitch. keep after it.[/quote] ok no problem Ill work on that at home and then take it to the mound slowly. What are some things that I could do to make it easier to make my stride longer? I know I have to work on the mechanics but is there anything else that would help?

Whoa! That’s probably too much. I’d bet your stride isn’t 110%. Measure it. Mine was always about 90-95%. The key is finding a nice long length that allows you to stay balanced and also brace up over against the front leg when you release the baseball.

Well, Tim Lincecum’s is 120%. I think mine is 100-110%, I have never measured it. But when I pitch there is a 12 in. dragline from my back foot and I almost step off of the mound.

Tim Lincecum isn’t a human. I was once reading ESPN magazine and it said most MLB pitchers strides are 80-90% of their height

lol I probably only stride 90-100% only and if I go any futher, I fear I might tear my hamstring or sumthing…

To make your stride forward a little easier, not to mention a lot smoother and supportive of your entire upper body’s motion forward:
as your knee lift comes down and your stride foot stretches
out to your target …COLLASPE on the instep of your pivot
foot, and try and resist turning on the toe of your pivot foot
as long as you can.

This simple, yet fine tuning, of your delivery motion incorporating the legs can simplfy a lot things. But again, take it slow and easy as you pracitce.

Good question by the way. Check out the picture below to see exactly what I mean.

Coach B.

Well mine is 100% at least because I lay down on the mound sometimes and mark my spot. I usually stride a foot or so past that spot.

Thats how you are suppose to land. If you pointing directly at the target, you hip rotate earlier result in less power to the legs.

Not really, no MLB pitcher lands closed(except for Jered Weaver).