Be Your Own Scout

Soon, it’ll be the preseason. Soon, coaches and staff will be putting together a roster that resembles what they think is a winning combination. And on that note, you as a pitcher have two things going in your favor - (1) habits (2) predictability.

Every high school club has a certain limitation due to available resources. A pool of available players is one, last year’s record is another, and same tendencies to rely on certain individuals is yet another.

How can you find out the strengths and weaknesses that you’ll be facing this season? It might be easier than you think.

Many local papers, in the sporting section, will do a review of each high school club in every division. They’ll usually give some credit to returning players, all stars from last year, returning coaches, and somewhat of an appraisal of how strong the pitching/hitting/running game is - or - will be.
In short, someone has done you a tremendous favor but letting you know in advance what to look for when it’s your turn in the rotation. So, make a notebook on who’s-who, what you can expect most of the time, etc…

As the season progresses, keep track of ERA’s, base stealing stats, and other input necessary to arm yourself prior to getting your feet wet. If you know before hand what 80% of the opposing club is strongest at, your light years ahead of others that don’t.

If you’re not sure when or if your local paper does such a review, call - or even better yet, write the sport’s editor and ask if and when they will.

Coach B.

Great post Coach B.
Every summer our pitchers keep a notebook on the hitters that we know we will face in the Spring. We write down their names, where and what pitches we threw to them, and the result of each at bat.

[quote=“coloradokid32.”]Great post Coach B.
Every summer our pitchers keep a notebook on the hitters that we know we will face in the Spring. We write down their names, where and what pitches we threw to them, and the result of each at bat.[/quote]

thats pretty good stuff right there.

For example: Jim Turner, one of the great pitching coaches of the major leagues, used to keep a voluminous notebook full of pitching charts, and he also would have a pitcher keep the chart on the day before he was going to start. Excellent idea—keep a record of the batter, which side of the plate he batted from, his characteristics, strengths and weaknesses, what was thrown to him and—most important—his reaction. Did he have a tendency to go after the first pitch, no matter where it was—or did he take, no matter what—or was he sizing up the situation and wait for a pitch he felt he could hit? But what if you had to face someone like Yogi Berra, about whom it was said that the only way to pitch to him was to throw the ball UNDER the plate? :lol: Who was it who said just fire the ball in there and DUCK!!? Anyway, it’s a good idea. 8) [/wmp]