BBCOR bats and pitching

With the new bat regulations coming in 2012, do you think it will change the way you go about your pitching? Or no?

atttack the hands.

^^^thats always the gameplan :smiley:

i don’t think it will change, hits will still be hits, homers will still be homers…it will cut down on some of the dinker crap and texas leaguers where guys that can’t muscle a ball, supposedly muscles a ball out to the outfield. Those will just be infield popups.

Steve, great point …

I was working a camp today with a couple pitchers that I will be guiding next Spring, and we talked about how this was a great opportunity to be more comfortable with being aggressive in the zone early in the count, more so than previously … the difference in the bats is so similar to wood ( except that you still cant break it coming inside! ) , so I really hope the kids out there take advantage !

I don’t think it should. See, we play in a wood bat league during the summer, and while I’m not looking forward to going back to BBCOR, that shouldn’t change my pitching philosophy. You are always trying to get the hitter off balance, messing up his timing, giving him what he doesn’t expect. That will yield the same results. You will get hurt more if you make mistakes, but that just shows you where you need to work!

CS…

What is your opinion of BBCOR vs. Wood? Do they play the same or does one have more “pop” than the other? My son’s Easton Surge cracked and we sent it in for a replacement. Easton was great (as always) and sent a brand new BBCOR replacement (his original bat was a BESR rated bat). Anyway, he has played one game with the BBCOR bat and was a bit bummed out (as I expected). He will need to play with a BBCOR bat next year in High School and he’s wondering if he’s better off with wood or is BBCOR better?

[quote=“gettingthere”]CS…

What is your opinion of BBCOR vs. Wood? Do they play the same or does one have more “pop” than the other? My son’s Easton Surge cracked and we sent it in for a replacement. Easton was great (as always) and sent a brand new BBCOR replacement (his original bat was a BESR rated bat). Anyway, he has played one game with the BBCOR bat and was a bit bummed out (as I expected). He will need to play with a BBCOR bat next year in High School and he’s wondering if he’s better off with wood or is BBCOR better?[/quote]

I wish there were some way to make everyone understand that BBCOR will perform very very close to wood. That was the standard they worked for and got. The way its going to work is, the very bet, top-of-the-line, leading edge BBCOR will perform SLIGHTLY better than wood, and the very worst BBCOR, SLIGHTLY less than the very best BBCOR. The difference in the BBCOR bats is going to be the way they feel to the player, not in how the ball comes off of them. That will of course produce different results for the individual, but its not gonna be as though and Easton hits the ball 450’ and an LS hits it 440’, while a wood only hits it 400’.

And of course, even if BBCOR and wood were exactly the same as far as performance, the non-wood would always have a slight edge because of longevity, so you decide. Will your boy hit better with one than the other? There’s no way I believe he’ll do better with wood than non-wood, unless his non-wood’s “FEEL” is way off.

Also consider this. I seriously doubt that there’s gonna be a lot of coaches allowing players to use wood in games. Other than in blowout situations, I didn’t see more than 1 or 2 woodies all last season. I know out of the 6 coaches in our league, only 1 allows players to use wood in games, and none of his players did that.

Now if you believe in your heart that your son will have a better shot at a ‘ship if he uses wood, forget it. College coaches couldn’t care less. If you think he’ll have a better shot at getting drafted out of HS, that might be true, but that’s a mighty slim hope to hang the decision of which bat to use in HS.

[quote=“gettingthere”]CS…

What is your opinion of BBCOR vs. Wood? Do they play the same or does one have more “pop” than the other? My son’s Easton Surge cracked and we sent it in for a replacement. Easton was great (as always) and sent a brand new BBCOR replacement (his original bat was a BESR rated bat). Anyway, he has played one game with the BBCOR bat and was a bit bummed out (as I expected). He will need to play with a BBCOR bat next year in High School and he’s wondering if he’s better off with wood or is BBCOR better?[/quote]
My opinion of BBCOR vs Wood? As a Pitcher I like pitching to wood, as a hitter I would rather use the BBCOR for a few reasons. First off, the BBCOR has a lot less pop than the traditional BESR bats, but I always thought that BESR was way too easy to put a pitch over the fence. In high school I wasn’t small, but I wasn’t strong, yet I remember one time fishing for a ball outside the zone and hitting it over 350 feet over the fence. I didn’t do anything but connect square, yet even lacking power the ball went far.
I feel like the wood bats that are composite have more pop depending on the bats. We had two demarini and two omaha bats this past year in college, and I felt like only 1 was better than wood, but then again one is all that you need. Eventually wood will have to conform to BBCOR standards as well, and I can see that some of the compositie wood bats will have to change.
Ultimately though, I would use a wood bat. With a smaller barreled bat with less pop, you experience a humbling process as a hitter and get true feedback. You know every single time you are jammed or way too early on a pitch. Hit with wood during off season practices, and as game time comes around switch to BBCOR.

I don’t want to come across as nitpicky, but I feel its important to be somewhat precise when speaking about these things. It is definitely true that BBCOR bats will have less “pop” than MOST BESR bats, but I wouldn’t go so far as to say all BBCOR bats have a “lot less pop” than all BESR bats. I think the problem comes in when you use words like “traditional”.

Perhaps traditional to you means $300-400 top-of-the-line composites that have been rolled or otherwise altered to improve performance. If that’s the case, then your characterization is valid. But to tell the truth, in the general day-to-day mix of players and bats, we didn’t see a great many of those super-hot bats, so I’d have to say that our “traditional” BESR bats weren’t producing many 350; shots at all, let alone ones that weren’t hit very solidly and on the better part of the sweet spot.

The distance the ball travels is finite. With any given bat it takes a certain velocity of pitch and a certain bat velocity to make the ball travel 350’, or any distance for that matter. Where the ball is pitched really has nothing to do with it, nor does the strength of the player swinging the bat. I’m gonna guess that while you somehow believe the fact that the ball wasn’t down the pipe, it must’ve been the bat that was the reason the ball went over the fence. There’s some truth to that, but my guess is, if everything could be put back exactly as it was, with the only difference being you’d have a BBCOR bat, I’m betting the ball would have still traveled at least 335’-340’. That might not have been enough to get it out, but it wouldn’t have exactly been a bunt either.:wink:

I’m sure they do, and it will be better for everyone when all the bats have roughly the same performance.

I’m always surprised when someone says or implies that a good reason to use wood is because it’s a smaller barreled bat. But as you can see in the NCAA rules, the opposite is true. I’ve been told by a bat manufacturer that woodies have been getting increasingly smaller over the years to reduce the weight as much as possible, but the truth is, someone using the largest diameter bat they could, would be gaining 1/8th of an inch in diameter, and believe me, that 1/8th inch means one heck of a lot!.

[b]NCAA Rules, Section 12

a. Wood bat. The bat must be a smooth, rounded stick not more than 2¾ inches in diameter at its thickest part …

b. Nonwood bat. (3) The maximum length is 36 inches and the maximum diameter is 2 5/8
inches.[/b]

This might be interesting to take a look at. Sports Science breaks down the hitting potential of the newer BBCOR bats.

SK, All I am saying is that for me, my wood bats that I use have a smaller barrel. I’ve never been a fan of the large barreled wood bats. Yes, you can get them larger, but I still believe that these are going to give you better feedback as a hitter.

As a pitcher I think I will like the new bats but as a hitter I guess I will see, bough my first one yesterday and haven’t hit with it yet.

My sons going to be a freshman. He is young and played at 13 yearold level. Previous year used a combat and hit with good power. We decided to get a bbcor bat to prepare him for 9th grade. We got the nike aero m1. I was schocked at how different his hitting was. I thought it was technique problem. Teammates used all kinds of bats -5 to -10. In most leagues and tournaments not many bat regulations or checks. Is this this bat in paticular or will this be the same for everyone.?It sounds like more small ball?

jaxson78,

What it is is a reality check! With BBCOR being so close to wood as far as performance goes, the bat as a factor in the equation is becoming more of a constant than a variable, and what’s left is players will e much more dependent on skill. That’s going to come across many different ways to many different people. The “great leveler” has arrived, get used to it because the same thing’s happening to everyone. :wink:

Really? I’m not saying you’re at all wrong, but have you actually measured your bats and found them to have smaller barrels than legal metal bats?

Now whether or not a wood bat gives better feedback, I can’t say because that’s something that would likely vary from player to player. If you really believe its true for you, so be it. Can you explain what it is you’re getting as feedback from wood that you don’t get from a BBCOR bat?

Used my new BBCOR bat yesterday, Easton Hammer BBCOR: BK6, got it because it was cheap and I wanted to see what all the BBCOR hipe was about ($49 at Sports Athority) honestly it felt, reacted and sounded a lot like my wood bat. Ball came off with good velocity and I felt like I had pretty good control with it. I am going to put the wood away this fall and just get used to this bat more.

[quote=“scorekeeper”]\Really? I’m not saying you’re at all wrong, but have you actually measured your bats and found them to have smaller barrels than legal metal bats?

Now whether or not a wood bat gives better feedback, I can’t say because that’s something that would likely vary from player to player. If you really believe its true for you, so be it. Can you explain what it is you’re getting as feedback from wood that you don’t get from a BBCOR bat?[/quote]
SK, I like my bats to have a 2 1/2" barrel, usually with a 1" or 15/16" handle. It’s just what feels comfortable to me as a hitter, the bigger barreled ones always feel top heavy to me.

Basically the feedback that I am talking about is that the BBCOR feels as if it still has the sweet spot of a BESR, but if you are off too far inside/outside, it hits like a wood. With a wood you are trying your absolute best not to take a pitch on the handle or end of the barrel knowing that the bat could break. Metal you don’t get that either. I also just feel more comfortable with wood.

I’ll ask you again, do you measure your bats, both wood and non-wood. With the BBCORS putting a lot more emphasis on MOI, you should soon be able to find a bat weighted exactly as you like best.

I guess I’m not getting what you’re trying to say. Maybe its that you’re not describing what the sweet spot feels like, so its difficult for me to evaluate what you’re saying from one bat to the other. I know the BBCOR sweet spots have been reduce pretty substantially from their predecessors, so whatever it is you’re feeling, can’t be based on performance. And there’s nothing that me or anyone can say that will ever change your mind about what’s only a feeling, not necessarily a fact. Its like if you prefer a black glove or high-top spikes. There’s no difference in how they perform, but there has to be a reason why people like each.

I bought my son a bbcor this year with in 8 games 5 of our 10 hitters were using it. I did not really see that much of a difference in compared to besr bats. it still had a huge improvment over wood. We take bp with only wood bats and hit off the tee with wood. No home runs at all during practice or bp with the wood. but he hit 3 this year with the bbcor during games over 230. hes only 5ft 102lbs. the bbcorr still has much more pop then wood imho. what I really dislike are the kids with the easton stealths speed that walk up to the plate with what looks like softball bat with the huge barrels. I say we just do away with anything but wood and save the $300. We were at cooperstown and I watched a kid 6ft 3 hit 7 for 10 in the home run derby all over 300 ft. when my kids throwing 50 ft away it scares me. one of our pitchers caught a laser he did not even know he caught. 18 inches higher it could have got ugly. wood bats seperate the great players from the average players. I alsosay we move the fences back at 12 and actually teach the kids BASEBALL. how to manufacture runs.nothing steams me more then losing to a team not as fundamentally as good as we are by giving up a couple home runs on 200 foot fences. Move the fences to 400 and teach the kids how to hit opposite field to get on. bunt to move a guy. I see kids get pissed off because they sacrifice fly and dont understand thats how baseball in my opinion is really played. its been a long season of 60 games it is nice to be back