Bats

Does anyone know the best 2008 models? I’ve heard good things about the new Stealths and the new Nike model.

If your serious about your place in the game and your progression talent wise I strongly suggest that you consider starting a collection of the following: (again, if your serious about the game and being looked at based on your overall talent.)
1st -Rawlings Big Stick 325 Light 34 IN
2nd-Rawlings Big Stick 232 32 IN PROFESSIONAL MODEL
3rd- Louisville Slugger #125 Flame Tempered C243
4th- Louisville Slugger #180 Flame Tempered GRAND SLAM

Like I said, if your serious about your presence and your ability to play ball the way it should be played, these bats are wood and their of different weights and lengths.
Having a collection like this in your bag is like a mechanic having a roll-a-way tool box. As with the mechanic - you have different tools (bats) for different hitting scenarios. For example - a 34 inch bat that’s agreeable in weight is great for “hitting for yourself”, on the other hand a 32 inch bat shortens the bat’s sweet spot back to your hands just enough so you can fight off the inside pitch and avoid hitting into a double play.
I know metal bats are expense. so, you’ll spend just about the same starting a modest collection of wooden bats. And while your at it, get a couple of rolls of good-ole black friction tape and wrap the handle of your bat’s up about fifteen (15) inches from the bat’s heel. That’ll help cushion the “Bees”.
And here’s a side benefit to using wood - it makes you a lot sharper as a pitcher then you might think. Using wood takes a lot more concentration in the art of hitting - thus, you see the other side of the picture more clearly from a batter’s point of view. And that’s one of the hallmarks of a good pitcher - learning by doing. Observe - practice - perform -perfect- observe - practice ------

Coach B.

[quote=“Coach Baker”]If your serious about your place in the game and your progression talent wise I strongly suggest that you consider starting a collection of the following: (again, if your serious about the game and being looked at based on your overall talent.)
1st -Rawlings Big Stick 325 Light 34 IN
2nd-Rawlings Big Stick 232 32 IN PROFESSIONAL MODEL
3rd- Louisville Slugger #125 Flame Tempered C243
4th- Louisville Slugger #180 Flame Tempered GRAND SLAM

Coach B.[/quote]
Again, great advice. My son has always practiced with wood in the off season and between tournaments and league games. However, he still uses non-wood at game time. He loves the Easton Stealth BCN7 composite bat. Lots of pop and feels and sounds more like wood than typical aluminum bats. It is expensive, and to tell the truth I don’t think you need to have the latest and greatest to be a great hitter…however, it makes him comfortable and confident at the plate, and he bought half of it himself, so I don’t object. This year I am in charge of tournaments and I have a couple of wood bat tournaments in mind, and its my hope that he’ll gain enough confidence in his wood bat to use it all the time. Cuz when he gets all of it with wood, it goes every bit as far as it does with aluminum. Its on the mis-hits that you get the benefit of aluminum’s forgiveness.

Hope this helps.

Hose

your assistance with your son using wooden bats will pay off big time in the near future. I can tell you from personal experience that a player wanting to make it into college and definitely for the pros, stand in the box and use wood. But not just wood for wood’s sake.
Also, I guarantee you that when there’s a scout – any scout, at your son’s game(s) and he/she hears that distinctive — ka nock, they look a little closer at the player using it.
Here’s my suggestion for your son:

  • save a little here and there and INVEST in a baseball future by INVESTING in a just four wooden bats. Something similar to the ones I itemized. But make your selection based on what your son feels comfortable with.
  • Go to the park with a batting tee and USE THEM. Use them a lot. No game time pressure, no must win attitudes from the bench – just get the feel of the “tools of the trade”.
  • Try different hand grips, like top hand curled over, top hand curled in, cheat up on the bat for slug bunts, etc. Again, get a feel for the “tools of the trade.”
  • Wrap the handles with black friction tape – a lot. Make the grip portion spongy so your son’s grip feels the multilayer black friction tape give a little as his hands tighten. This spongy give will add great control to his swing.
    Your son will be light years ahead of his contemporaries and his true ability of perfecting a “prospect’s game”, will increase with every use of his wooden inventory. In all my years of coaching I have never seen this fail— never.
    I sincerely wish you and your son the very best.
    Coach B.

TPX Exogrids are really nice, my teamate had one

The head coach at the place I go to the winter for baseball says that (and I’m not downing anything you say Coach Baker becuase you do have great advice but this is what I hear the head coach to where I go say) instead of buying a wooden bat invest in a composite wooden bat. Now I have only used 1 kind of composite and from what I understand if they’re all like it a composite is just a wood bat with a layer on it so it doens’t break. I have been going to this place for quite a few years and only one year I remember the composites actually breaking and remind you that these bats are being used probably 5 times as much as any baseball player would use them.

The coach says if you buy a composite it will last you a lot longer and save you more money then if you buy regular wood. Now you can’t use it in a game (I think) but it makes a great addition if you already have an aluminum. Also as an added bonus it doesn’t just make you a better sweetspot hitter it also weighs a tad more so it’s almost like a weighted bat.

I’ve never had one but the palce I go to seems to last pretty long on these things and if anyone else can contest to it then that will back it more. I’m just going by what I hear. Coach has your team ever used composites and what does anyone else think?

[rant]Let me chime in on metal bats for a bit. I don’t see how much of an advantage it is having a bat with more “pop” if we even know that the more expensive bats have more or not. If your a dead power hitter then I guess I understand but if your a normal single or doubles hitter how much more can an expensive bat with “pop” help you. I know there is an advantage but you also have to think that with your fancy poppy bat a normal hit could turn into a lineout? I know there is more of a chance for an advnatage but is the advantage that great? I think all of these technologies are just to make money. A good hitter doesn’t care about a little extra pop. Especially if you can get a nice bat for half the price of the expenso-grids.[/rant]

why wouldnt you use a metal bat if you can. that so called extra pop can be a HUGE difference and not just to a power hitter. think of the grounders that would leave the infield but a diving stop gets you out. i think wood bats could be good to train with but you are putting yourself at a serious disadvantage using wood in a game instead of metal.

Dude if your refering to what I said you missed the point completely. Maby I wasn’t clear enough. I said that I don’t see how much of an advantage a $400 meatl bat is compared to a metal one say half that price. Training with a wood is great but honestly it’s a bit disrespectful to your team to use a wooden bat during a game just becuase you want to get better. If you can use a metal I think you should but thats just game scenarios.