Bat tapers

On a wooden bat, the taper often varies a lot, It can be very quick, very long or anywhere in between. What I would like to know is which size is best and/or lasts the longest.

[size=18]Examples[/size]

[size=18]Long Taper[/size]

[size=18]Short/quick taper[/size]

What do you mean by “lasts the longest”?

I’m not sure if this will address your question, but I was with a club that players that would bring a collection of bats to the field - depending on the situation that they faced during a game.

I’m not a batting coach, nor do I have the knowledge to qualify what I saw other than to witness situations and circumstances. But on one occasion I asked a team member why so many bats? His response went along these lines:

He had no less than five bats that he’d bring to play, each with their own characteristic. Some where short in length, other longer, while others yet where less tapered at the neck - based of the barrel, while others were like a whip neck. He also had a collection from different manufacturers. He had the Slugger, Worth and a couple of Big Sticks (Rawlings). The two (2) Worth bats were heavy at the end of the barrel (sweet spot), while his other bats were less so.
To watch this man bring this collection of tools to his trade was like watching a PGA pro on the tour - each bat (tool) was for a different situation.
For example, if a bunt was on, his selection was narrowed down to a few of his favorites that suited him on that particular day/night. If on the other hand he wanted to place the ball in play and advance a runner for either a “hit-n-run”, or sacrifice - again he’s select the proper tool for the job.
Now you’d think that such a system would be easy to spot, pitch to, defend. Wrong! The man left our club and went elsewhere - stepped into the box whereas our backstop spotted the “going for the fence” bat, so he called a pitch to take away that edge. BUNT, down the third baseline right between our man on the mound and the catcher chasing after the ball. I was in the bullpen at the time, but I had a clear view of the look on our pitcher’s face -“ Yeah - swing-away my !@#”.

We had another man that would always take his 32" bat up to the plate on his first up-at-bat.
He was a power hitter, a real moose. Like clockwork the very first pitch that he’d get -without fail would be inside. Well, because the sweet spot was moved a lot closer to him with his swipe path and swing pattern, more often than not a quality contact was in the cards. On the other hand, he did break a lot of bats during the season - BUT, did ring up a lot of doubles.
He also went elsewhere, but in his case, our rotation faced him with a lot of success. He wasn’t as flexible as others.

So I guess the size, shape and other particulars of a bat (wood now) depends on the personal persuasions of the user. Taking into account that the user has said persuasions.

Coach B.

I did pick up a few things that hitters do with their bats to increase the quality of hits and to extend the life of the bat (wood).

Standard friction tape would be wound around the neck (barrel) about 12 inches from the heel (nob end). Some batters would make that wind very thick at a point where the hands would grab the bat. Others wouldn’t go the thick route - but, would wear batting gloves that had a very thick and padded palm and inside finger section.

Why?

The greater the hands are - open - while grab’g a bat, the greater your strength of grip and power that’s transfered from your arms and hands to the use of the bat during your swing and contact.

An old batting coach was instructing some players during a BP session that I attended and I heard him suggesting this to a couple of batters. Darn if the thing didn’t work! I took some time after a practice session to see for myself - and he was right! The greater the hands are open when grab’g on to the handle of a bat, the greater the grip power is passed on to the slug’g contact of the bat. The tape also acts as an absorber of vibration - thus reducing cracking and breaking of the bat when your boxed inside on the narrow neck of the barrel. And if you’ve had the "B-ees :bee: on your hands, you’ll appreciate this wrap’g of tape even more.

I’m not sure of this would work in your situation and even if the subject is relevant to your quesiton - but, I thought I throw it out there.

Coach B.

I know it didn’t say it but I thought initially it said “bat tapper” you know the batters that come up to the plate and “kill” home plate by beating it to death prior to their at bat…sorry to be off topic but it was really funny in my head.

Ohhhhhhhhhh … I get it… the kind of moose that’ll pound the plate and look at the pitcher … so much to say … " OK MEAT, JUST PUT THAT LITTLE BEAUTY RIGHT ABOUT HERE…"

Geeesshhhh … then me Mrs wondered why I drink!!! :eek:

Coach B.

The hitters kinda act like the plate stole their last cookie, they seem to think they are Bam Bam from “The Fred Flinstone Show”.

Thanks for all of your information. Coach B. I understand what you meant by all of the different sizes of bats he had and I thought that, that was pretty interesting. However, I just wanted to know if the taper of the bat could cause the bats life to extend or decrease. And I don’t think you guys knew what I meant when I said taper. What I meant was how fast the handle transitions to the barrel. But hey, I learned allot from your responses.

Also I am curious about this:
[/quote]The greater the hands are - open - while grab’g a bat, the greater your strength of grip and power that’s transfered from your arms and hands to the use of the bat during your swing and contact. [quote]

What do you mean? Is it, the thicker the handle, the more power? Or something else?

buwhite- Lol man, it was still funny even after it came out of your head. I didn’t mean for Taper to come out that way and I think that the way I spelled it in the topic is actually the way you would say “he tapped the plate.”

scorekeeper- When I said “Lasts the longest” I meant the life of the bat. I just wanted to know if the taper would affect that.

Now on bat taper, you know that when I have seen my kids play in wood bat tournaments it really seems (no hard data here) that more of the thicker bats are shreded vs the thinner handle. Seems weird but we have all heard that cracking sound or of couse the total shred of a bat, you look at it afterwards and you notice the thickness and you would think the thicker the better but I don’t think its true

[quote=“karatekid552”]Also I am curious about this:

What do you mean? Is it, the thicker the handle, the more power? Or something else? [/quote]

Here’s an example. Lets say a batter can squeeze a very very thin handled bat with a force of 50lbs per sq in. That same batter would be able to exert a force of maybe 60lbs per sq in if it was a very very thick handled bat. IOW, he could grab the bat tighter, transferring more force to it during the swing.

Depends on the bat. On a non-wood it really doesn’t make much difference. But on a wood bat, it can make a heckuva lot of difference. Think of it this way. IF you put a 1” board across two bricks, and a ½ board across tow other bricks, which do you suppose would hold the greatest amount of weight before it broke?

Life of a wooden bat = until I shred it with a pitch!!!

thanks buwhite for your great information on bat life. :baseballpitcher: :baseballbatter: Also I believe that the reason that the thicker handled bat broke faster was becasue they had to be dried more to make them the same weight as a thinner handled bat, or it could be that the person swinging it didn’t know what they were doing (first time using a wooden bat)

scorekeeper, thanks for claering up the matter of the thickness of the handle vs. power. However I still don’t think we’re on the same page about the bat taper. When I said that it was how fast the handle transitions to the barrel I ment how long the transition was. Some bats have a very quick taper where you have the handle, then a couple of inches later, the barrel is at maximum diameter. While others have a very gradual taper that is difficult to tell then the taper ends and the full barrel diameter begins.

Here are some examples to show what I mean, the taper is enclosed by the red box.

Long Taper

Short/Quick Taper

:urinate: (I’m sorry I found this one funny)

[quote=“karatekid552”]…scorekeeper, thanks for claering up the matter of the thickness of the handle vs. power. However I still don’t think we’re on the same page about the bat taper. When I said that it was how fast the handle transitions to the barrel I ment how long the transition was. Some bats have a very quick taper where you have the handle, then a couple of inches later, the barrel is at maximum diameter. While others have a very gradual taper that is difficult to tell then the taper ends and the full barrel diameter begins.

Here are some examples to show what I mean, the taper is enclosed by the red box.
[/quote]

OK. Well, I’m very likely gonna miss something, but I give it a bloody go.

In wood bats especially, the taper is used to as a way to control weight and weighting. IOW, it’s a way to control the overall weight of the bat, and to control the balance point of the bat.

With non-wood, it works much the same way, but it can be a lot more flexible because the bat is being manufactured rather than cut out of a chunk of wood. Look at a softball bat alongside a baseball bat that weighs the same.

Howz dat? :wink:

Thats perfect, now I want to see if it will have any affect on the life span of the bat.

karatekid552,

Check your PMs.

thanks man for the link, really appreciate it. :smiley:

You’re welcome. Did it help? :?:

ya ma, I looked at it for a little while and found a lot of good stuff, Thanks!