Bat speed


#1

First of all I appologise for the this being a non pitching post but I respect the opinions expressed here so I’ll ask.
I am trying to measure bat speed and was told that a radar gun used on pitchers would not work, could you possibly have a batter hit a ball off a tee and and measure the ball? If so, how accurate would it be?


#2

Not accurate at all, the speed of a ball leaving the bat is considerably different due to so many things, 1) the bat, recently there are more restrictions on bats because some of the -3 bats used in HS and College had much greater ball speed leaving the bat than others, they are standardizing the bats through a much more rigerous testing program. The weight of the bat can effect the ball speed vs bat speed, general physics kinda thing. 2) the ball itself 3) environment that day. I am sure there would be other factors too.

You can get a good indication if you are applying a more substantial force to the ball if as you use the radar gun on more hits the mph increases, well it might decrease too…you can atleast know the difference.

There are some things you can put on the bat to measure bat speed, also there is some software that you can use video to measure the speed.

Good Luck


#3

If only Ted Williams were still around, you could have asked him. A long time ago he found that it was the speed of the bat, not how heavy or how light it was, that accounted for his power at the plate.


#4

I totally agree with that Zita.


#5

I agree also, all I was saying that a stationary ball on a tee will not accurately reflect bat speed since there are so many factors involved in the physics behind that action, just like in contact sports speed is power, just using a radar gun in this was doesn’t acturately represent the bat speed.


#6

I agree buwhite, I guess I could still use it for non-scientific comparisons.
Same bat and ball, different batters, or same batter different bats 29" vs 30".


#7

That would work I think in that case, at least you would find what bat a particular individual could apply the most force to a ball with, if a 29" had an average ball speed of 50mph and a 30" give a ball speed of 55 mph as long as nothing else changes you could assume that the longer bat is applying a more substantial force to the ball for that individual.


#8

I would go ahead and use the radar gun because ball exit speed is really what is important.