Baseball vs Working out


#1

hey guys whats up.

Here is a tough question i got to ask you guys?

I am going to be a senior this year and last year my hardest pitch was clocked at 87mph. I would say average 83-85mph.

Anyways i really want to excel at baseball. And make it to the next level.

But the question pops up just how far will you make it and do you have the stuff to make it to the majors.

I have been weight lifting since i was about 13 years old and i just love it. I would never do steriods but i want to have big biceps and a nice chest.

Anyways if i do workout on my biceps and chest with heavy weights and get reallly big will it affect my velocity.

I am doing alot with my legs with heavy weights as well as plyometrics and core. But ya can i have a big upper body that is strong?
But at the same time have good velocity.
Is it possible.
I have seen a guy in the majors who is just huge? i dont’ want to be that big i just want the beach body every guy dream of.

I know how to get it. But it might affect my pitching velocity.
So ya is it possible to have big biceps and chest but at the same time increase my velocity from about 87mph-90mph+


#2

Sorry, but no. That will get you tight in your upper body which could cause you to throw slower actually.


#3

I’d say that’s pretty darn good - along with being 98% consistent with your strike locations, being dependable when needed, keeping up good grades, not doing things off the field that detract from what you do on the field, respecting family, keeping your priorities straight, and so on. Stay healthy, stay healthy, stay healthy.

Making it to pro ball has a lot to do with being seen, and showing off your marketable skills. Yes … marketable skills. If you plan on making professional baseball a life’s work ( a living) start thinking like a businessman. Your a product now - put together a business plan to market your product (you) and how best to sell it. Exposure in the right places, at the right time, and the biggest bang for the buck, is the way to go. Need so advice in that regard - ask here, you’ll find lots of help.

I strongly suggest making it on a junior college or regular four (4) year college club first, get that organized “seasoning” under your belt, deal with the multi-demands of a college program - plus sports, see what it’s like to deal with the pecking order of “who’s - who”, the politics and overall demands of breaking in as a rookie, then progressing from there.

Until then, razor your pitch inventory, start elisting the help of your coach(s) to contact colleges not that far from you, ask your advisors for a little assistance with the introduction process that usually goes hand-n-hand with college applications and financial aid.

Did I address most of your question?

Coach B.


#4

yes thank you.

One problem is that i live in Canada where the winters are pretty cold. Its very hard to find places to throw in the winter.

On top of that their isn’t even 1 single team in our province that has a NCAA baseball team. Kind of disappointing.

Its very hard to get looked at as well.
Also their was this showcase camp that i was going to go to. But i decided not to.

The reason for this was because our season started in May. I started in april to be ahead of the game. Anyways, i played baseball may, june, july, august, and the showcase was at the end of september.

Really really stupid i think. My arm got pretty tired, because i was the ace of our baseball team. Anyways ya its hard to get looked at.

Should i consider putting myself on you tube maybe?
Like a recruiting video. Would that honestly work.


#5

Chest and bi’s are the two muscle groups you want to steer away from being a pitcher. Back, tris and legs are where its at. I feel the most important part about lifting heavy is you absolutely have to maintain your flexibility and stretch. Being flexible will give you more velocity and keep you away from injury. Plyos and core work are also very key. The one area of the body i feel so many pitchers dont think about are your hips. Everyone says you pitch with your legs and you want to have a strong core but if your hips are weak you lose all of the torque your legs are producing.

As for putting yourself on youtube i don’t think it could hurt. But if i was a college coach I would much rather watch the pitcher in person or hear from someone that knows how you throw over watching video.

Hope i helped.


#6

Baseballkid, since you live in Canada how about just throwing a bunch of snowballs every day, just a joke sorry, I got it out I’ll be serious.

I am assuming that you are wanting to go to college in the US right? Since you are trying to play baseball. Just because you don’t have everything it takes such as where you play, and exposure, etc., but 87 mph is a respectable fastball and you still have another year to increase that with a good winter workout program like Tuff Cuff of a program with a coach in your area. Remember velocity is about the ability to develop torque not brute strength, so lifting is not the answer to get you over 90.

I would suggest that if you can’t get recruited directly for baseball through videos and showcases then you should go the other route and walk on, it requires you to make your choices of college based on academics (you always need this to be a priority since whatever you do then you will always have the education) then walk on to the team and with what you have you have good potential. During the college WS last year the announcers kept mentioning player after player that were walk on’s and not regular scholarship athletes (the players got athletic scholarships later but not as freshman). D1 isn’t the only choice, some of the best players go to Jr. College and then transfer also.


#7

A baseball is 5oz. You don’t need to be a giant to throw it 90 plus.

The more weight you have on your body the more you have to transfer from your back leg to your finger tip when you release the ball, which means you could be slowed down which means less velocity.


#8

So you are saying that the heavier and the more someone weighs, they will throw the ball faster?


#9

isnt there cis baseball teams in canada


#10

baseballkid111, i suggest you get a baseball specific workout book since you have so many questions. Tuff-Cuff would be a great one to get. It has a long-tossing schedule, year round workout schedule, nutrition, cardio, and stretching exercises. If you want to make it to the next level, thats what you’re going to need.


#11

[quote=“baseballkid111”]yes thank you.

One problem is that i live in Canada where the winters are pretty cold. Its very hard to find places to throw in the winter.

On top of that their isn’t even 1 single team in our province that has a NCAA baseball team. Kind of disappointing.

Its very hard to get looked at as well.
Also their was this showcase camp that i was going to go to. But i decided not to.

The reason for this was because our season started in May. I started in april to be ahead of the game. Anyways, i played baseball may, june, july, august, and the showcase was at the end of september.

Really really stupid i think. My arm got pretty tired, because i was the ace of our baseball team. Anyways ya its hard to get looked at.

Should i consider putting myself on you tube maybe?
Like a recruiting video. Would that honestly work.[/quote]

baseballkid111,
i live in canada as well and there is a former winnpeg blue bomber (CFL)
who has formed a company that helps kids get noticed no matter wat the sport in canada or the states… they just have to know your grades

pm me for the website if u want


#12

schell burg not trying to be stalkish or anything but do you live in Alberta by any chance. I live in Alberta.

Also questions are not bad at all. Most of the questions i have i know the answers to them i am just wondering if i can pick up some additional tips. YOu can never have to much information.

I woudl really like to buy that tuff cuff manual. But honestly i am going into my senior year. Is it really going to make a difference me doing the manual. Shouldn’t i just continue doing what i am doing. Seriously i am not complaining when my fastball topped out at 87mph. I only hit it a few times during the year. BUt still my average was about 85mph which should be good isn’t it.

I also have pretty decent command and a sweet spike curveball that i throw as well as a change up that takes about 12mph off of my fastball, as well it is very deceptive when i throw it.

But ya should i continue doing what i am doing. Or not?
Also can i have some more info on this tuff cuff manual please.


#13

srry i live in manitoba,
about an hour away from winnipeg kinda near emerson

that website i talked about is
csaprepstar.com