Bad mound, steep slope, ditch at rubber


#1

The mound at this one field we play at a lot has the most ridiculous slope in the front, it’s so steep of an angle that it’s like you’re throwing off the side of a hill, meaning your front foot does not hit the ground until later than you’re accustomed to… anyone have any tips of how to cope with this?? … it totally screws up my control…

also, this same mound develops a huge ditch at the rubber that sets me down there a good inch above my ankle deep … and you can’t really move from one side of the rubber to the other because you’ll end up messing with your front foot even more because you slip into the gaping pot hole at the front of the mound…

Brutal conditions… totally screws up my control.


#2

If it bothers you that much, take some clay and a rake and go make the dirt harder, and rake it out.


#3

Snake has it right there are some things you can do to help yourself by fixing the mound in the correct way or atleast more fitting to a pitcher.

I’m not sure if anyone will agree with me but even though its tough on your mechanics and control and velocity I honestly think going through a situation that you are with a sub-standard mound is not neccessarily all bad. I think by having to tweak your mechanics may actually help you in the long run because of just that, having the ability to change your mechanics. I say this because from little leaguers to professionals, all pitchers have to change a part of their mechanics. Whether its because of control or your just stuggling. I’ve pitched on some bad mounds and i think it helped me understand my mechanics. I’m probably way off base but those are just my thoughts.


#4

that’s a good point, because I definitly have to fight the natural urge to open up too soon on that mound.


#5

I also agree with Snake : get to the field early with a rake or shovel and clay and fix the mound yourself.

Other things you can do is try starting your motion from different locations on the rubber (many pitchers always throw from the same position on the rubber) until you find a comfortable spot.

The issue of the big hole in front of the rubber can be somewhat worked around by pitching from the stretch all the time. It’s not a great solution, but sometimes “you gotta do whatcha gotta do”.


#6

anyone ever trying pitching by actually standing on top of the rubber itself, or even right behind the rubber?

do you think it would really matter velocity wise, adding that extrat 2-4 inches of distance? I hate to do that, but anyone ever try it?


#7

In my first start in college I misplaced my post foot and put it on top of the rubber, I wasn’t able to push off well, left it up in the zone and it landed somewhere WAY off on the wrong side of the left field wall. :lol: I should’ve just stopped and not thrown the pitch, but you live and learn I guess.


#8

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]anyone ever trying pitching by actually standing on top of the rubber itself, or even right behind the rubber?

do you think it would really matter velocity wise, adding that extrat 2-4 inches of distance? I hate to do that, but anyone ever try it?[/quote]

Standing on top of the rubber is dangerous, as you can slip, and detrimental to effectiveness because the pivot foot has no place to anchor and push from. Although there are some schools of thought that you should not “push” off the rubber, it still helps to brace yourself against the rubber as you come down from the leg lift and begin the stride.

As far as being behind the rubber, you have the same issues, plus a problem with the rules. The umpire may call an illegal pitch, depending on how he interprets rule 8.01; in particular:
"… The pitcher shall stand facing the batter, his entire pivot foot on, or in front of and touching and not off the end of the pitcher’s plate … The pitcher may have one foot, not the pivot foot, off the rubber … " (MLB Official Rules)


#9

Bad mounds piss me the hell off. Everytime I go to a road game and I look at the mound and it’s shit, I want to cuss the hell out of whoever is in charge of that field. Seriously, is it that hard?


#10

My coach told me a good quote… it applies here.
“A good craftsman never complains about his tools” Baseball is about adjusting, so do it!