Bad Defense

ok I’ve been here on a number of occasions but where do tou go as a pitcher when the men behind you are not making the most basic of plays, last season i gave up a total of 11 unearned runs in 3 innings of 1 game! And if like me you arfe not a strikeout pitcher tthen what do you do?

you could talk to your coach about the poor defense, or you could do your best to become a strike out pitcher. this happened to me on my teener team and i ended up going to the 5th inning with no hits then i would just be worn out from 100+ pitches. then some1 else would come in and blow the lead by a unbelievable amount

If you’re getting opponents to hit into what should be basic plays, then you are doing your job and I wouldn’t change a thing. Pitchers who induce weak infield hits usually throw fewer pitches that strike-out pitchers which means they can go deeper into games. They also get their defense off the field faster and back on the offensive.

That’s not necessarily true.

That’s why I said “usually”. It does take the defense to do its part or else that doesn’t happen.

I meant when the defense does do it’s part, it’s still not necessarily true. I’ll try to find the article where this was talked about.

Ok I haven’t found the article so I can’t say for sure what it said but the basic premise was that K pitchers pitch about the same as GB pitchers. In my poking around just now though, it seems to be that if you compare a K pitcher to a GB with identical wins/losses at the same age, the K pitcher will end up having a longer career.

Do you remember what level pitchers the article addressed? My comments are based on my experiences with youth pitchers where the hardest throwing pitchers are the strikeout pitchers and they inevitably throw more pitches than the pitchers who throw more off-speed and junk pitches and induce more weak hits. Maybe this changes at the higher levels?

Longevity - that’s an interesting angle. I can’t say I’ve thought about that. Working with youth pitchers means I’m not working with pitchers late in their careers. Of course, there are no absolutes and I’m sure there are exceptions to this. But I’m curious to see how long the D-backs’ Brandon Webb lasts.

Do you remember what level pitchers the article addressed? My comments are based on my experiences with youth pitchers where the hardest throwing pitchers are the strikeout pitchers and they inevitably throw more pitches than the pitchers who throw more off-speed and junk pitches and induce more weak hits. Maybe this changes at the higher levels?

Longevity - that’s an interesting angle. I can’t say I’ve thought about that. Working with youth pitchers means I’m not working with pitchers late in their careers. Of course, there are no absolutes and I’m sure there are exceptions to this. But I’m curious to see how long the D-backs’ Brandon Webb lasts.[/quote]

Well all these comparisons were done at the professional level so you are probably right about the youth pitchers. Good point.

Hummm Maddux, Glavine…Anybody remember Jessee Orasko…I think he was 120 when they finally wheeled him out to pasture. Ryan threw smoke for years and so does the Rocket. I think if you are good you pitch…less likely to be released may be the thing…if you still have MLB speed.

the rocket was great, but to bad nobody will know how great he was without his butt full of hgh

So any other advices besides “bocome a K pitcher?” :?

I’m interested too in this topic for personal reasons.
In all of my five-year career here in Finland I haven’t thought about pitching or the mental side of it since I’ve played in the field and have been that defensive guy making errors from time to time.
But for this upcoming season I’m expected to take a role in our pitching staff so now I’ve really gotten into pitching, studying it ect.
Here in Finland we play on fields made of dirt, sometimes no mound and big rocks and holes all over the field.
You can actually see some images here including our beautiful mound:
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So, the result? A lots of bad/very bad bounces, helped out with already poor overall skills lead to a lots of errors off course. So, as a pitcher, how to overcome all the frustration and keep focused? Any tips?

the most i could say is work fast. throw very little balls. love the fastball up in the zone, i havnt met a batter yet who wont chase it for a strikeout

Two things. First, you have to get out to the mound and make sure it’s in good shape, and if need be go after the groundskeepers and make sure they get the mound in good playing condition. Second—I may have said this before in another post, I don’t know, but it’s essential that the fielders, particularly the infielders, use a good deal of their practice time in infield practice, cutoffs, hard grounders, turning the double play, the long throw across the diamond from third to first—all these things. No wonder you give up a lot of unearned runs; your infield in particular has been falling down on the job, and they HAVE to work on their defense!
And it doesn’t hurt if you get into the act as well, regardless of what type of pitcher you are. Remember—when you step off the mound you become a fifth infielder, and you have to be in position to handle anything that might be hit your way.

Every pitcher in history… lemme repeat that Every Pitcher In History has gone through innings, heck entire games where their defense stunk up the joint. The important thing to remember is that you have NO control over them.

A lot of pitchers when faced with this situation often revert to the worst possible thing a pitcher can ever do, and I have done this on a number of occasions. You try and do it all by yourself. You try and throw harder and in the process you throw off your mechanics become erratic and get even more frustrated.

Your up there doing your job. Producing groundballs/flyballs that should be guaranteed outs, but your defense might as well have stayed home because they can’t make a play to save their lives. As crazy as it might sound, stay calm and focused. Keep doing your job, and whatever happens happens.

The key is that you CAN NOT control the situation! The only control you have is how you REACT to said situation.

I agree with Roger…GB pitchers are very effective and tend to go deep in games…Wong and Halladay are good examples.

Bad defense drives youth coaches crazy because it means the difference of throwing maybe 10 pitches in an inning to throwing 30! It’s an unfortunate by- product of youth learning the game.