Back leg follow through height


#1

What are thoughts on the height of the back leg on the follow through? I see a good bit of high velocity pitchers have a pretty high follow through on the back leg, curious if we think that contributes a good bit to velocity and if this is something that should be practiced with a pitcher? My sons mechanics are pretty good, the one thing I feel he can improve on is getting a little more lift on his back leg on follow through. Thoughts??? TIA


#2

sunagod76,

“What are thoughts on the height of the back leg on the follow through?”

Treat it as it is, if you have been taught and wish to continue to really bend your back by being able to touch the ground to recover, the higher the back side leg recovery the less stress you are going to create on the lower Lumbar (think Kershaw here). These pitchers try to rotate but can’t because they try to start body rotation off the ball side leg.

If you have been taught to stay tall and rotate to throw off an extended glove knee, it becomes an axis off which to pull rotation from the glove side leg (correct walking response) where it is best to keep you ball side leg down and punched thru to the inside to recover at 180 degrees of full body rotation

“I see a good bit of high velocity pitchers have a pretty high follow through on the back leg”

Old dogma dies hard! The trend is heading the other way in the MLB and why you are seeing more forearm pronated fastball Sinkers from shorter strides to create more efficient body rotation by staying taller while the ball is making forwards progress.

“curious if we think that contributes a good bit to velocity”

We don’t because it does not! Traditional approach pitchers release the ball when they are upright in the Torso. Because they do not body rotate well their ball side leg stays anchored back perturbing rotational advantage.

“and if this is something that should be practiced with a pitcher?”

Pick your poison! There are 2 choices tall or collapsed.

“My sons mechanics are pretty good” Thoughts?

Ask yourself what degrades the lower back in pitchers?

Ask yourself what is the worse possible defensive position a pitcher can attain when Bubba squares one up?


#3

The back foot usually comes around in a slot that mimics the arm slot. The inertia of the upper have in its plane of rotation causes the lower half (specifically the back leg) to follow around in the same plane.

Because the back foot comes around after ball release, it is not something to work on.