Back Knee collasp and hip rotating before shoulder


#1

In my video how much do the hips rotate before the shoulders?

How can I get the back foot to not stay on the heel through the delivery and would that help me get the hips pointing at the plate when I hit ground?

Explain How I could get the hips to point at the plate at Landing?

This is the video help me out and please answer my questions i need help asap

Thanks JP


#2

Do you mean aligning the hips sideways between home plate and 2B (i.e. closed) or having the front of the hips facing home plate (i.e. open)?


#3

I mean have the Hips open at landing with the torso closed so you get the stretch in the muscle so you can whip the arm around.

Is that better and help you answer the q’s I have?

So when you stride you open the hips up right before you throw so they are 90 degrees but the torso is sideways till you land.


#4

Ok, so why do you want your hips completely open at foot plant?


#5

I think you’re back leg is collapsing because you are striding too FAR.
that’s what it looks like to me


#6

whre u throwing full speed??
how hard u throw then

It seems like u eventhrow across your body
it looks kinda weird, maybe cuz of the side arm?


#7

I think Tanner and I found a way to get the hips open about 70% at landing. All you do is stride strideways when you go to plant you flex the front leg to 90* and then plant this opens up the hips for some reason and it works good for me.

I also found a way to get ride of the posture issue of leaning back. I stay tall now because I focus on it more and try to get the fibers to stay tall not bend and collasp when I video tape next I will post ok.


#8

The hips usually start to open up at foot plant because most people lack the flexibility to open the front foot/leg into foot plant without the hips rotating a bit. But the hips don’t complete their rotation until the front leg braces and stops the forward movement of the front hip resulting in the back hip rotating around the front hip.


#9

roger hate to tell you look at pictures of Roger Clemens when he hits the ground the hips/belt buckle is facing home. Look at Scott kazmir and tim lincecum they both rotate before they plannt while staying closed so they can rotate the shoulders fast.

The hips are open a pretty good amount while staying closed.

belt points at plate most pitchers not in mlb the point sideways you want it to be open

http://photobucket.com/mediadetail/?media=http%3A%2F%2Fi175.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fw131%2Ftexastornado05%2FRoy20Oswalt29.jpg&searchTerm=roy%20oswalt%20&pageOffset=1
Look his hips are open a good amount right before he hits ground

MLB pitchers open the hips up before they hit the ground.


#10

RIstar
None of those pitchers have the belt buckle facing right at home plate when they land. Casey Fossum is the closest I’ve seen but that’s not the norm. The belt buckle on the ones in those pictures is pointing somewhat short of the direct line to home. First problem here is that we really don’t know exactly where home is in these pics. Draw a line through the hips and you’ll find that it is not aligned perpendicular to the target line.

The idea that used to float around of the hips not opening into landing has been debunked over and over. Even Dick Mills now agrees, and that’s saying something!

They’re not 100% open though.


#11

RIstar,

As DM pointed out, the belt buckles in those pictures are not pointing directly at home plate. Furthermore, we can’t tell from the still photos how long it’s been since the front foot planted. We see that it’s planted but for how long? If the foot has been planted for any length of time, that means the hips have had some time to continue rotating beyond the point they were at right at foot plant.

As I said previously, opening the front leg and foot into foot plant usually starts to open the hips. So you will normally see the hips rotate partially at foot plant. But they don’t completely open by foot plant - they finish rotating after foot plant. It is possible for the hips to be completely open at foot plant but we don’t want that because that wastes energy.

Take a look at the clip of Mark Prior on this site. Mark is an exception in that he has the flexibility to open his front leg and foot into foot plant while keeping his hips completely closed. But ignore that. Just focus on what happens with his hips after foot plant. You will see that the front leg braces, the front hip stops moving forward, and then the back hip rotates around the front hip. Maximizing this whipping effect of the back hip rotating around the front hip maximizes the energy transferred from the hips to the shoulders by maximizing the stretch or ‘load’ in the torso.