Back in teaching


#1

Maddux is a Cub again :lol:

http://chicago.cubs.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20100111&content_id=7900712&vkey=news_chc&fext=.jsp&c_id=chc

Man I’d give my eye teeth to be “tutored” by ths guy.


#2

what a treat for the younger guys in the cubs system this spring training


#3

Maddux, one of great wizards of the game…

Wizards and warlocks, out of deepen darken halls,
with spells and chants, as they dance the white ball.
With seams that spin, wobble and churn,
with the flick of their wrists, and a turn of their palm.

This man does stand on mysterious ground,
from ten inches high, measures the mound.
A stark white mantel is the perch that he stands astride,
as his magic is spun upon the horse hide he drives.

Now not all wizards are gifted as such,
nor are they equal with all the magical stuff.
Some have pitches with spells that react,
while other take chances with happenstance.

Ah, but then there are those that history will say,
had the gift of true wizardry, on any given day.
That special man who could weave at his will,
like words of an author with the stroke of his quill.
And many a roster, regardless of mix,
has tested this master will all of this tricks.

But try as they may to unseat from his mound,
the true wizard of wizards, and remove his bright crown.
With fastballs, curves, sliders and more,
with change-ups and pitch-outs, their frustration did soar.
Again and again, they charge the old man,
with battle axes of lumber gripped in their hands.

But with the stroke of his wands, and a glare cold as ice,
he’d vanquish the rosters, and turn men into mice.
These were no ordinary spells, no chants of delight,
for they were as deadly in the sunlight as they were in the night.

And as the last spell was cast, and the last battle done,
after so many years, he put down his ole wand.
And yet he was drawn to this mysterious game,
a game that gave meaning and a purpose to his name.
Lined up were those that who would serve the ole man,
and learn all they could from his experienced hands.

For this is the way of the heart and the mind,
the way of the ball and the magic of nine.
And the young apprentice listens with glee,
to learn from the master, the magic of STRIKE THREE!

Coach B.


#4

where did that poem come from? that is outstanding!


#5

Not just the young guys- the Cubs don’t have anyone who shouldn’t be breaking his door down, including hitters.


#6


where did that poem come from?

I’m sure Maddux will mentor a few Hall of Fame prospects before his tenure is over, so, it prompted me to remember a poem that I wrote about a similar man that I had the privilege to know.

I wrote that poem (mid 80’s) during a coaching job I had, with a very young and inexperienced rotation. The only saving grace we had was the addition of an older player - much older, that was finishing his playing career with us. I have no reservations what’s so ever in saying that he was a much better pitching coach than I at that time, and I benefited tremendously from his help and sincerity.

I have 16mm of his mentoring, which added a huge stability factor to our club in total. In fact, in many ways he was the keystone that lot of the younger guys looked up to. And to watch him hold the ball and explain things reminded me of a wizard working with his apprentice. To look at the man though, he didn’t show is age, and his overall impression was a crowd pleaser - and by no means was he lacking in appeal with the ladies.

That poem I sent home, while on the road, after watching the man struggle one night, then noticing one of his younger counterparts eagerly wanting to follow him in the game - so in the youngster went. The rest I watched from the bullpen with amusement, enjoying every minute.

Coach B


#7

Bummer … he’s 6 years too late for me :slight_smile: