Average Pitch Count

I always see stuff like average velocity for some age group or how hard should someone be throwing, and it always depends on what the pitcher’s make-up is, their mechanics, and all that good stuff. But it always feels like every game I pitch, I throw a lot (I’ve had at least 5 games over 100 pitches this year so far) and I was just wondering how many pitches should someone be throwing. I know it depends on the pitcher on how much they can throw but overall I was just wondering how much would be healthy and if any of your city teams or school teams enforce the pitch count rule what are your limits? (by the way I’m 16 in case that somehow matters)

I really don’t understand why a pitcher at the high school level should evern throw over a hundred pitches?? Especially in a summer league or a fall league, when even though winning is still important, staying healthy and strong are even more important.

At the professional level, atleast in the minor leagues, most organizations have pitch count rules, and in most it’s set at 100 pitches. Honestly, I’ve seen pitchers get pulled in the middle of a batter because they reached 100.

I know that some colleges have some boundaries on the issue and some don’t. But as a kid growing up and still developing there’s no reason why a kid should throw more than a hundred pitches. It should be encouraged that they complete the game in under 100 pitches, it’ll force the pitcher to become “efficient” with his pitches. No need to waste bullets out there.

I always felt like I threw a lot but the reason I was really kept out was because of a couple of reasons: 1. we don’t have very many pitchers and sometimes I’m one of the only ones left, 2. my coach leaves in a kid when he has a no-hitter going or a one-hitter sometimes (yesterday I had a no-hitter and slightly over 100 pitches, didn’t catch the total) 3. I never really get hurt when pitching (except for one time this year I never really got to warm up and I had to go in and pitch and my shoulder would bother me but after resting up it was fine)

And yeah I know those aren’t the best reason for leaving a kid on the mound (but I do have fun pitching so I’m not really complaining) but that’s why I posted this, just wondering what would be healthy to throw and stuff like that.

[quote=“Hammer”]I really don’t understand why a pitcher at the high school level should evern throw over a hundred pitches?? Especially in a summer league or a fall league, when even though winning is still important, staying healthy and strong are even more important.

At the professional level, atleast in the minor leagues, most organizations have pitch count rules, and in most it’s set at 100 pitches. Honestly, I’ve seen pitchers get pulled in the middle of a batter because they reached 100.

I know that some colleges have some boundaries on the issue and some don’t. But as a kid growing up and still developing there’s no reason why a kid should throw more than a hundred pitches. It should be encouraged that they complete the game in under 100 pitches, it’ll force the pitcher to become “efficient” with his pitches. No need to waste bullets out there.[/quote]

I’m not trying to refute anything you said, just trying to make two points here.

First, it’s hard to compare professional pitch counts, especially in the minors, to pitch counts at the amateur level. Many professional organizations institute pitch counts to protect their investment since they’re paying some top prospects millions of dollars. They’re trying to prevent injuries, just like amateur coaches should, but some professional organizations are overly cautious, like lifting a pitcher in the middle of an inning simply because of a pitch count. A good example of this is when the Mike Pelfrey was pulled from a Double-A game two years ago because he had thrown 35 pitches in the inning (it was the second inning, I believe) even though the team had made three errors behind him and his stuff was good that day.

The other thing I wanted to point out is that some coaches believe that pitchers should throw as much as possible. Leo Mazzone is probably the most famous proponent of this. And this doesn’t mean always going out and throwing a ton of pitches, but if a guy hits 100 pitches and still feels and looks strong, it won’t hurt him to keep going.

And for the record, I’m kind of on the fence about that train of thought. I’ve pushed pitchers to 120 pitches on rare occassions, but I’ve also pulled pitchers because of a pitch limit even though they’re cruising along.

Yes, pitchers are protected too much at the professional level, no doubt…but… they are investments like you said…

Of course we’ve heard about some peoples views on pitchers throwing as much as possible. I’m not necessarily against that either, but I just think as a kid growing up and still developing he doesn’t need to be throwing over a hundred pitches.

What I have much more of an issue over is a pitcher not getting proper rest between starts or not being allowed to prepare properly for a game. I think that it is reasonable to throw upwards of a hundred or better, provided the pitcher is properly conditioned and isn’t laboring during the outing. It makes me crazy though when I hear about 12, 13 or even younger kids throwing hundreds of innings (Even up to 200) in a spring/summer season and then having their daddy talk about how little Bobby is the one kid on earth that can handle that sort of abuse…4 or 5 seasons in a row (Go over and look at e-teamz…these guys that do this are so defiant). Or the ever popular “I threw back to back games at this weekend tourney because my coach said we needed me” (I think Ristar whipped that one out on us this year…)…I hope the guys that do this wake up to a vindictive wife with a tube of super glue… :evil:

Great post, and a gret way to end it! :lol:

Your exactly right JD…

These types of coaches are very disturbing…

A kids future at these young ages are way more important than a victory is some darn tournament. Let them develop and get stronger! Don’t kill them!