ASMI and throwing

Well i know the ASMI tells you not to throw a baseball for like 3 months but I want to continue drills or dry throwing not 100% or even close just keep the mechanics sound.

How many dry throws a day would be safe so that I don’t tear alot of muscle or get hurt?

Ps nothing is in my hand when doing the dry throwing it’s just nice and easy nothing crazy no arm power into the dry throws at all just trying to keep my overall mechanics ok.

Find out. Do 200 towel drills a day and see how you feel the next day and adjust accordingly.

I don’t like to hold a towel so I just have nothing in my hand just a glove is that ok?

the secret is not to throw at maximum effort. if you throw at 70% you can throw a ton and not strain anything. you can resume throwing after a 2 week rest period if you take it easy and you’re just working on something. if you’re just working on mechanics or a release point they make “kush” balls. you can find them in the toy section of wal-mart in the south. they are a big ole wad of rubber bands and weigh next to nothing. we set up a chair with a pillow slid over the back and throw into the pillow in the house. do not throw at a nice kithen or dining room chair without the pillow, you will break the spindles on a wooden chair.

buy 10 or 20 of them and get fter it. take masking tape and measure your height in a straight line toward the chair off to your throwing hand side slightly. you can get work this way if there is no where else to throw.

we also hang an atec pitcher’s target 10 feet away and throw into it when we can’t get outside or in a cage. it’s much better than nothing and you can work on mechanics and build arm strength.

good luck and keep working. i would recommend renting the pitching tunnel 2 times per week for 30 minutes if you can’t find somewhere else inside.

do you have high school practice in the fall and winter. if you’re doing high school practice and then additional full workouts, you could start throwing too much. be careful.

dusty

my high school does not workout for baseball together. So I’m on my own for the moment with workouts and working on mechanics.

is there a place at your high school you can throw?

Might be worthwhile to review the basics of the towel drill. Its purpose is not to enhance velocity, it is, in part, for the purpose of reviewing correct mechanics without putting excessive strain on the arm.
Sounds like that’s what you want to do.

http://www.nationalpitching.net/iclips.asp?

Cheers;

O

I’m not looking to throw I’m taking 3 months off to rest only will be doing 30 dry throws a day to get my mechanics down. But the reason for 3 months is the ASMI say’s that’s the right amount. I will start to throw long toss from january to end of febuary. Then we have tryouts where we throw bullpens and things like that so I will be ready to go by beining of season.

Workout this year goes from october 15th to febuary 1st then I will only focus on in-season workout to maintain and do long toss more.

[quote=“RIstar”]I’m not looking to throw I’m taking 3 months off to rest only will be doing 30 dry throws a day to get my mechanics down. But the reason for 3 months is the ASMI say’s that’s the right amount. I will start to throw long toss from january to end of febuary. Then we have tryouts where we throw bullpens and things like that so I will be ready to go by beining of season.

Workout this year goes from october 15th to febuary 1st then I will only focus on in-season workout to maintain and do long toss more.[/quote]

I say taking 12 months off a year is good. Now, because I said so, do it.

The ASMI is a creditable organization and the pro’s take that much time off from throwing so I’m going to do it too. 2 Months of long toss into tryouts is pretty good even though I made the team already.

The pros play 162 games in the summer, the postseason, and some even play winter ball.

Ok what do you think i should do then?

ristar,
you’re wise to take the time off from throwing. work on stretching and strength development till jan. that is a good plan. you really need to find someplace indoors to throw come jan. if you’re throwing with your high school team then, that will do it. it only takes 20 minutes to go through a quality throwing program.

In january I will be throwing outside when I can with long toss 3 times a week working for arm strength.

my rule is if it’s 32 degrees and up I will warm-up like crazy with tubing running and 5 minutes of arm cirlces and throw my long toss of 40 pitches for the amount of time it takes which sholdn’t be that long.

Some people like to take time off, some people don’t. Some pitchers will end up playing winter ball, so they don’t take much of a break at all from throwing. Just depends on what you want to do. All you have to do is listen to your arm. If it’s barking, take it easy.

RI, if you’re trying to icorporate Jaeger’s ideas for long toss then you’re off a little bit. He’s not just about throwing to max distances, he’s about taking your time to warm up and eventually getting to max distance. His long toss sessions go as long as 45 minutes.

His guys are not allowed to move to the next distance until they can make 5 straight throws without having their partner move. So there is a command/control component as well. Also, on the way out they generally put more air under the throw and on the way in they usually throw on more of a line.

The folks we work with say from 45 to 60 days of active rest. Now my son will go about doing just about everything active you can think of…lifting, running, hitting practice, and just enjoying life, he’ll tube and do shoulder type pt, but less than normal, just enough to make it feel “right”. We don’t throw. It has always worked well and believe it or not Ristar, you won’t forget your mechs. Now that doesn’t mean that you can’t “shadow box” and consider possible motion/delivery changes, you throw a heck of a lot, so my opinion is that letting it rest and recover is absolutely the way to go…you may get away with not doing it once or twice but I would suspect that it’ll ultimately break down and you’ll have to really rest it then.

Along with Letstalkpitching.com, I read another website called insidepitching.com. They have some pretty interesting articles on offseason conditioning/rest periods at different universities (LSU, Vanderbilt, Purdue, etc.) posted right now. These articles are written by the pitching & head coaches and provides a summary of what they do in the offseason. From what I’ve read it seems pretty much pitcher specific if you take a rest period or not & really involves a good deal of common sense and understanding of your past pitching demands/activities and a sense of what your body is telling you.

My opinion (take if for what it is worth) which is adopted from what my pitching coach has told me after I asked him whether I should shut my arm down before now because I have tryouts in early Feb and didn’t want to go into them with a tired arm.

His rules were -

If you arm feels tired or seems like it is taking a longer time to recover from a throwing session than normal - then you need to rest some - skip a throwing session or two & let it rest up and see how it feels. If it is still tired after one or two of your throwing sessions you should probably shut it down for a little while. Of course this is a problem if your arm wears out the day before tryouts & you go into the season with a tired arm, but he said to vary your workouts/intensities and this would help keep your arm from getting tired/overused.

The address for the website is -

http://www.insidepitching.com.

What a lot of people forget is that the recommendations regarding shutting down or not and for how long are not universal. I would not give a Little Leaguer the same recommendations as I would a college player. In my opinion, those open growth plates and immature skeletal systems need an annual shutdown of 8-12 weeks.

I agree Steven. I have seen guys overdo it in little league and even up into Jr. High and they never seem to get it back after they’ve hurt themselves.