"armed and dangerous"


#1

Several months ago the New York Times ran an article titled “When Radar Gun Hits 100 M.P.H., There’s More Than Meets The Eye”, and one reader made an interesting—and very pertinent—comment which I would like to quote in full. He said: "Major league teams waste tens of millions of dollars on pitchers like Mark Prior and Francisco Liriano, whose elbow and shoulder injuries destroy their potential production. These arm problems are nol a result of being injury-prone; rather, they derive directly from poor mechanics.
"It is clear just by looking at pictures of these pitchers that the path of their throwing arms
is different from that of durable pitchers like Tim Lincecum, Randy Johnson and C.C. Sabathia, among many others.
"Dr. James Andrews, the orthopedic surgeon, said he hoped Dr. Glenn Fleisig’s research at the American Sports Medicine Institute would ‘put him out of business’, and I hope it does. But Rick Peterson’s metaphors about fast cars and fancy houses are not fixing anything."
The writer, Craig Thompson, hit it right on target. The only sure way to prevent arm, elbow and shoulder injuries is to make sure the mechanics are sound. 8)


#2

So what is your thoughts on Strasburg? It will interesting to see how things play out with him.

Mechanically he is sound, but will his arm put up with him throwing 100 over the course of a Major League season?

I’m not talking about Verlander stadium gun 100 either when they juice the radar gun 4-5 mph. I’m talking about Strasburg Stalker 100.

Can’t wait to see.


#3

I would assume, like other major leaguers who can throw 100, he wont actually gear up that many times during a season, especially as a starter. Longevity Longevity


#4

[quote]"It is clear just by looking at pictures of these pitchers that the path of their throwing arms
is different from that of durable pitchers like Tim Lincecum, Randy Johnson and C.C. Sabathia, among many others. [/quote]

One man comes to my mind when i read this comment. Anybody want to take a crack at it?


#5

[quote=“wwRHP”][quote]"It is clear just by looking at pictures of these pitchers that the path of their throwing arms
is different from that of durable pitchers like Tim Lincecum, Randy Johnson and C.C. Sabathia, among many others. [/quote]

One man comes to my mind when i read this comment. Anybody want to take a crack at it?[/quote]

Does his name begin with C and end in hris O’Leary


#6

What this statement lacks is the inclusion of the important factor of “overuse” or lack of sufficient rest. I would improve the statement thusly:

These arm problems are not a result of being injury-prone; rather, they derive directly from some combination of poor mechanics and overuse .

Major league baseball being the business that it is doesn’t feel too bad about the arms falling apart. After all, the bodies they are attached to are compensated quite nicely. Mark prior received 10.5 million just to sign. Liriano stuffed over two million in his pockets over four years. Strasburg, 15 million…and he hasn’t thrown a pitch in the bigs.

The state of affairs in MLB financially speaking has the owners protecting their investments to a very limited extent. Oh you will get much lip service for sure. The reality is they are making so much money from TV, radio and shared revenues that it doesn’t matter much whether Strasburg lasts more than a few years or twenty years. The fact is, the more successful and dominant he becomes the more compensation he demands. Owners of poor teams will posture about how they are trying to improve their teams but they are accountants first and then fans of the game.

There are teams, like my beloved Pittsburgh Pirates who are downright abysmal at developing arms but they make money every year before opening day and one single bucco fan hits the turnstile.  The team payroll is way below the shared revenue so who gives a rats rear end about a pitchers arm.  They are represented by a union, let them fend for themselves.

 And so my bottom line is, pitchers better take care of their own arms at least until they cash in.  And don't believe everything you hear from the front office about how valuable you are to the team.

:roll:


#7

What’s DANGEROUS is misleading, incomplete or wrong information. Attributing Prior’s injuries entirely to mechanics is a failure to recognize the serious role of overuse. It also fails to tell the whole story.

Oh, and has Lincecum been around long enough to be considered durable? Hmmm… :?:


#8

What Roger said 8)

Yea sure. While I agree that having poor mechanics may cause problems throwing, but I think having poor mechanics (and I could be wrong) will cause you not to be able to throw with the velocity it takes to compete at the MLB level. So it’s not the injury potential really…it’s just that you won’t get a chance because you throw poorly (with substandard velocity).

There is nothing “safe” about throwing a baseball 100mph. Throwing 100mph (or near enough) one or 2000 times is even more “dangerous”.

But that’s the risk for the big paycheck.

An this guy is who? A writer…? :lol: oh ok… :?

There are lot’s of guys that have so called “good mechanics” that get arm injuries. Over-use, under-rest, and lack of conditioning is probably more of the problem than any mechanical issue.


#9

[quote=“UndersizedRHP”]So what is your thoughts on Strasburg? It will interesting to see how things play out with him.

Mechanically he is sound, but will his arm put up with him throwing 100 over the course of a Major League season?[/quote]

That’s a good question.

It’ll be fun to watch him while he lasts though (he said tongue firmly in cheek ;))

[quote]
I’m not talking about Verlander stadium gun 100 either when they juice the radar gun 4-5 mph. I’m talking about Strasburg Stalker 100.[/quote]

So do you also think that Zumaya didn’t throw 100+? BTW Verlander was hitting 100 in college.


#10

I’ve had season tickets for the Detroit Tigers AA affiliate for several years. I saw Zumaya, Verlander ,Porcello and alot of others. It’s not unusual for a AA pitcher to sit between 87-89 if he’s a starter. The average AA guy gets it in and around 89 maybe amping it up to 91 on ocassion. On the low end, 85mph is not unheard of. Im just talking about the fastball.

Having set that stage…Zumaya and Verlander have BIG arms. They put up three digits in AA. I don’t think the local affiliate is going to switch out radars just to feed the myth. When someone hums it up there 100 grand, you don’t need a radar to tell the difference.