Arm "slop"

What are the effects of arm “slop” as 101 calls it. If you don’t know what slop is its when the arm is up to early and has to wait for the body to catch up. Can it cause more stress on the shoulder and more specifically what parts?

I am asking this because I feel that I have some arm slop, I am trying to correct it. I believe it comes from the fact that I was taught that the arm should be vertical at footplant.

This is simply breaking the hands too early. This causes the arm to get up too early and you may hyperabduct, which may lead to arm soreness(in my case).

To correct it, break your hands later.

[quote=“kevinbert28”]This is simply breaking the hands too early. This causes the arm to get up too early and you may hyperabduct, which may lead to arm soreness(in my case).

To correct it, break your hands later.[/quote]

The hyper-abduct is nonsense to this matter.

Correcting it may or may not be as simple as breaking the hands later.

Arm slop (or as I like to call it “slack in the whip” or slack in the rope") is a timing issue between body parts as they transfer rotational (hopefully) momentum/energy from one body part to the next in the kinetic chain (or sequence) that eventually leads to the end of the whip - the throwing arm.

If this timing is not perfectly executed in exquisite fashion, you have “slack” or “slop” where this energy “leaks out” before it gets a chance to get transferred efficiently into the throwing arm.

It is debatable when the “slack” is finally taken up that it would cause injury.

I guess at the worst this inefficiency could cause unneeded stress (that could eventually lead to an injury) and at the very least it causes those very precious MPH’s that we work so hard for to be lost.

BTW Priceless - I don’t seem to remember saying you had “slop” in your arm action. I said your arm/elbow was getting trapped behind your body.

[quote=“101mph”][quote=“kevinbert28”]This is simply breaking the hands too early. This causes the arm to get up too early and you may hyperabduct, which may lead to arm soreness(in my case).

To correct it, break your hands later.[/quote]

The hyper-abduct is nonsense to this matter.

Correcting it may or may not be as simple as breaking the hands later.

Arm slop (or as I like to call it “slack in the whip” or slack in the rope") is a timing issue between body parts as they transfer rotational (hopefully) momentum/energy from one body part to the next in the kinetic chain (or sequence) that eventually leads to the end of the whip - the throwing arm.

If this timing is not perfectly executed in exquisite fashion, you have “slack” or “slop” where this energy “leaks out” before it gets a chance to get transferred efficiently into the throwing arm.

It is debatable when the “slack” is finally taken up that it would cause injury.

I guess at the worst this inefficiency could cause unneeded stress (that could eventually lead to an injury) and at the very least it causes those very precious MPH’s that we work so hard for to be lost.

BTW Priceless - I don’t seem to remember saying you had “slop” in your arm action. I said your arm/elbow was getting trapped behind your body.[/quote]

I have scraped my scap loading focus arm action for my old action. I can feel that when I throw my arm is waiting, I tried to fix this for a later arm action and I felt more velocity and had less soreness. I am currently using backward chaining to hopeful fix this.

What you really need to do is get your whole body into action—drive off the lower half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and seamless) motion, so instead of having your arm wait for the body to catch up the whole body leads the way and your arm and shoulder will just go along for the ride. This way you will not only get more power behind your pitches but also take a lot of pressure off the arm and the shoulder—and you’ll probably find yourself throwing harder and faster than you were doing before. I learned to do this a long time ago, watching the Yankees’ Big Three rotation and seeing just what they did, and believe me, it’s a great feeling, not only getting more pop in your pitches but also not one single sore arm or sore shoulder or sore anything else! :slight_smile: 8)

[quote=“Priceless”]
I have scraped my scap loading focus arm action for my old action. I can feel that when I throw my arm is waiting, I tried to fix this for a later arm action and I felt more velocity and had less soreness. I am currently using backward chaining to hopeful fix this.[/quote]

Maybe you should post a short clip of you throwing.

Just remember one thing. Albert Einsteins definition of insanity - “doing the same thing over and over expecting different results.” :shock: