Arm pronation


#1

Is early arm pronation for pitches like the sinker and circle change safe? My goal is to get a clean side spin, will this add extra stress? If so, where? What are some alternatives?


#2

The hand and forearm pronate after ball release on every pitch regardless of which pitch is thrown. So, in general, pitches thrown with early pronation are safe because you’re rotating your hand and forearm the same direction they will end up rotating after ball release.


#3

Thanks. Can you explain why the screwball is so hard on the arm? Is it how far the arm pronates?


#4

I know there are lots of folks who claim the screwball is hard on the arm and they point to some famous screwballer (don’t remember his name) whose arm became deformed by throwing the screwball. But I believe he threw a ton of those pitches. Yes, making the arm operate at the limit of the range of motion (i.e. max pronation) probably contributes. And trying to force your arm to pronate beyond what your flexibility allows also is asking for trouble. But I’d argue that the screwball isn’t that bad if you pronate only as much as your flexibility allows and if you limit how many you throw (just like you should be doing with your breaking pitches).


#5

pronation is very good for your arm in the sense that it allows it to decelerate, and pitchers who don’t pronate are at a high risk of injury based on what I’ve heard. as for the screwball, I have no clue how to throw one but it seems like you wouldn’t have natural pronation but more of throwing with your arm already fully turned. so it might hyper extend your elbow? i honestly don’t know haha


#6

Your arm will pronate regardless of whether or not you to do so.