Arm playing catch-up?


#1

Hey guys I don’t have any video but I have these two pictures. My question is: are my legs and hips opening too early causing my upper body to overwork?

http://spotted.yankton.net/photos/index.php?id=5314323&size=large

http://spotted.yankton.net/photos/index.php?id=5314733

Also, is there any other site that evals vid like this but for batting?

Thanks
Ish


#2

From the pictures it looks okay. However, get some video up. The only thing that bothers me is the low elbow it looks like it may drop when it rotates up into the high cock position. Sometimes this can point to arm playing catch up or arm dragging. But it may be nothing, just a feeling. Get some video

I’m not sure about batting clips.


#3

You are throwing off of one leg… in the second pic your back foot is off the ground and you haven’t released the ball yet - usually leads to control issues.


#4

Post some video, ish! It’s a little tough to tell with just a few still frames.


#5

I’d be careful with that advice too ish, don’t overdo it or focus too much on making sure the back leg is down to a point where you lock your hips.

I think you might be releasing the weight off the back leg a bit too early, that’s all. As you are rotating your shoulders release all that weight off the back leg, all of the weight on the back leg should be off just before and no later than maximum arm external rotation.

Releasing all that tension accelerates the arm through to the release point. If you release it too early, you’ll lose power. If you release it too late, you’ll lose it…it has to be just right.

When you watch a lot of pros pitch when they are going into max external rotation their back knee fires in towards their body, it’s a result of letting the hips snap completely forward by releasing the weight off the back leg.

As far as your main concern find a way to post a vid so we can help you more.


#6

I’d say that’s no small thing -

A pitcher who repeatedly throws off of one leg typically suffers from major inconsistencies with regard to control. This is usually pretty easy to correct - make sure the weight is on the back leg and then focus on keeping the back foot connected to the ground as long as possible as the hips glide forward, then roll the inside of the foot downward. With a good long low stride and when the hips rotate, the pitcher will drag the foot onto the big toe and will remain on the ground upon ball release.


#7

would that be affecting my velocity as well?


#8

[quote=“structuredoc”]I’d say that’s no small thing -

A pitcher who repeatedly throws off of one leg typically suffers from major inconsistencies with regard to control. This is usually pretty easy to correct - make sure the weight is on the back leg and then focus on keeping the back foot connected to the ground as long as possible as the hips glide forward, then roll the inside of the foot downward. With a good long low stride and when the hips rotate, the pitcher will drag the foot onto the big toe and will remain on the ground upon ball release.[/quote]

Yea I agree with that. My point was to not keep the back foot anchored, it does keep in contact but most of the weight will be on the front leg during the rotation.

Once that front foot lands is when you release that energy in the back leg and hips. The snap should be so fast that the action of the back leg is natural and out of your control. Once you pass that point of no return you’ll be well into the decel phase/follow through.

If you watch this vid of Roy Halladay http://www.baseball-pitching-tips.com/roy-halladay.html you can see if you pause it at 0:08 (later more towards 9 seconds) seconds when his back leg and hip fires his foot is off the ground during max external rotation. It’s natural to do so and a pitcher like him doing it should tell you a lot whether or not it’s an absolute. But like I said, once you do enough things right the action of the back leg is natural.


#9

I’d say more early 9 seconds in the vid not during 8 seconds