Arm after pitching

Is some tightness in the muscles of the shoulder of a young pitcher (11yr) normal the day after pitching a game? Or any part of the arm for that matter?

Thanks all.

I sat here trying to remember how my arm felt when I was that age and to be honest - I don’t remember any soreness or tightness.

I could have just forgotten though.

Are we talking simple tightness or with pain?

I never had that prob 8) lem. What I used to do between innings was keep a warmup jacket handy and put it on when my team was at bat, and after a game I would put it on and run some wind sprints for about ten minutes. That way I would always keep the arm loose and flexible. And I threw every day—whether it be just playing catch or doing a full bullpen session; as a result I never had a sore arm or a sore shoulder or a sore anything else. If you’re just talking tightness, that’s normal and will go away in a day or two—but you would want to prevent that. 8)

Yes it is just tightness and it does go away sfter a day or two. I think what Zita says is right and he will need to take getting warm and staying loose more seriously as he starts to want to pitch with more intensity. And coming out and pitching like that after throwing very little for a week is probably not a good idea.
Thanks

My opinion is that pitchers need to throw every day. That doesn’t mean pitch every day, but they should be throwing.

The day before and the day after they pitch, my guys throw concentrating on staying loose and getting a good stretch in their legs, core, back, shoulder and arm. They don’t throw hard, maybe 50 to 60% and all fastballs, no breaking stuff.

Before throwing they will typically stretch and run a few poles to get the juices flowing.

Many pitching coaches, such as Eddie Lopat, Johnny Sain, Leo Mazzone—you name them, they all say this: “Throw every day.” That’s what I used to do: I did some throwing every day, whether it be twenty minutes of just playing catch or doing a full bullpen session. I remember when I would do a bullpen; Lopat (what an incredible pitching coach he was, when he wasn’t beating the Indians to an unrecognizable pulp) would pull on a catcher’s mitt and set up some 60’6" away and catch for me. Unlike a lot of pitching coaches, he felt he could find out more about what I was doing from behind the plate, and when we took a break he would come over and talk to me about what I might be doing that wasn’t quite right—and we would work on it, to correct the problem. That’s what bullpen sessions are for.

I know of several pitching coaches who were initially against throwing every day. They have since changed their opinions in the last couple of years and now recommend throwing every day, much like the old school guys did.

I have to say that the guys they coach, my son included, seem to be better off for it. I have no studies or scientific evidence to prove this, but I can say what I’ve seen.

The guys that throw every day seem to have more stamina, less soreness, recover quicker, and I would guess less injuries.

Much of what you do depends on how often the pitcher gets into game situations and how many pitches are expected to be thrown in an average outing.

Starters, keep the arm warm throughout the game. Light stretching immediately after the game during your cool down and then 10-15 minutes of ice to minimize any normal, post-game swelling.

I’ve always found that keeping the arm moving as the stiffness starts to set in, like stretching with a weighted ball the day after pitching, helped reduce the duration of the stiffness more than without stretching.

Give yourself a couple of days before throwing full speed again and get ready for your next outing.

Relievers, be sure to communicate with your coach about any unusual stiffness or if the arm is not recovering as it normally does. Also, limit the number of warm-up pitches thrown prior to entering the game. Remember, there will be more pitches available to you before the game resumes.

[quote]Starters, keep the arm warm throughout the game. Light stretching immediately after the game during your cool down and then 10-15 minutes of ice to minimize any normal, post-game swelling.
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Are you icing injuries? I’ve found that icing is only necessary when there is a potential injury. Following an outing, I rather my guys stretch and run a bit to get blood flowing in the body, promoting healing.

I would be careful advising any pitcher to limit his number of warm up pitches. Each pitcher is different and some need those extra pitches just to get loose. The last thing I want is a pitcher taking the mound before he’s warm and loose.

Pitching is stress to the arm. Even if it’s not noticeable, there is always some swelling in the arm after a long outing.

It’s great to keep blood flowing to it immediately after leaving the game with something as simple as jumping jacks and arm stretching. These will maintain range of motion and minimize post performance stiffness the next day.

The icing is purely preventive and should not only be used following a severe injury. If you stop to think about it, everytime you pitch, your arm is ‘injured’. How fast you ‘recover’ is dependent upon how well you ‘rehabilitate’ it.

Once you ice the arm, it’s done for the day. Don’t ice if you may have to re-enter the game.

I believe each pitcher should be developed to his physical limit. Each person is different and league enforced pitch or inning counts prevent development of the top athletes to protect from injury the kids with poor mechanics who shouldn’t be pitching anyway. Often they are only on the bump because all the real pitchers have reached their cookie-cutter pitch limits. When one of these non-pitchers gets hurt, the pitch limits get reduced and more unqualified kids take the hill. It’s a sad state of affairs and is taking the game in the wrong direction.

Some kids can be developed to throw over 100 pitches without any extra risk of injury. It takes a focused coach to watch each pitcher and evaluate each as an individual. One day a kid can throw 50 pitches and be fatigued to the point that he must be removed or risk injury, but I also believe that in the right circumstances that same kid can throw over 100 pitches or more in relative safety.

It’s getting tougher to be a coach and know how to stretch the limits these days because the kids don’t just play for one coach. Some kids are pitching for 2-3 teams. It’s too much of a headache to calculate the condition of the arm when it’s being used in games you don’t witness.

With all that in mind, icing regularly is not just recommended, I require it of my guys.

[quote]Some kids can be developed to throw over 100 pitches without any extra risk of injury. It takes a focused coach to watch each pitcher and evaluate each as an individual. One day a kid can throw 50 pitches and be fatigued to the point that he must be removed or risk injury, but I also believe that in the right circumstances that same kid can throw over 100 pitches or more in relative safety.

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What age kids are we talking about?

I think he’s saying don’t throw more than necessary to get loose. Some kids you tell to loosen up, you look down there 10 mins later and they are still throwing. When asked if they are ready they say, yes. I guarantee they threw more than necessary.

I agree that some kids can throw way more than average with no risk of injury. I had one kid throw 126 pitches over six innings. He was a strikeout pitcher ratio of like 80 fb 20 cu 20 cb 1 hit 11k 4bb. After about 80 pitches I was nursemaiding him and he kept telling me he was good to go. No arm soreness even the next day, but I put him at 1b just to rest him. Four days later another 4 innings and 85 pitches with no arm soreness just a bit stiff in the lats. Many of my kids can’t reach the pitch limits without losing effectiveness. All workloads should be case by case person by person. No cookie cutters please.

I’m not real big on pitch limits, BUT, 211 pitches in 4-5 days is ridiculous. Irresponsible coaches that will pitch a kid that much in a week are one of the big reasons for the pitch limit rules.

In this case, the league ran a 6 inning rule in a fixed calendar week. So pitching 6 innings in the first week and 4 in the next week. Technically, I could have used him 2 more innings in that second week, I like to give them 4 days off for proper rest so I chose not to. Having good pitchers who are perfectly good to go just sit on the bench to experiment with another player on the mound and getting shelled or starting up the Happy Carousel is not what you want to watch. Then umps start opening the strike zone and giving hitters the short end to move the game along wastes everyone’s time.

The pitch total was an anomaly but it shows what some of the better athletes are capable of if you let people pitch until they are losing effectiveness or get tired. Most can’t do that, but some can. Look at MLB, not everyone is a starter. If you have a kid who can be a starter in high school and you only ever pitch him two innings that’s not helping him either.

Contrary to popular belief, their arms are not all made of glass.

Whoa. Never said arms are made of glass.

Kids are strong and resilient. My own son, a HS sophomore routinely goes 80 to 90 pitches a game, usually on 4 days rest.

126 in 6 innings then coming back 4 days later to throw 85 in 4 is a lot. Capable of, Yes. Smart, IMO No.

By the way, what age are we talking about?

How old are these kids that you are “coaching”?

Doc, I’ve asked the same question twice now in this thread and can’t seem to get an answer.

6 innings would be LL or Ripken 13 and under. So its, most likely age 13 or lower. I would like spin to confirm this before I weigh in.