Arm action problems

I have a ‘hitch’ in my arm action where it comes up to parallel and gets stuck and in turn makes for bad external rotation. Are there any drills I can do that correct this flaw?

I want my arm to get to the ‘up’ or ‘power L’ position continuously and earlier in my motion.

Here is a link to my most recent pitching video.

Thanks for you help.

This is a case where Paul (coachxj) would be very helpful. He offered to work with you. How did that end up?

I explained this in the video I sent you…there’s an active attempt to externally rotate the humerus to pop the forearm up into position

like i said, go in front of a mirror and go through your arm action, it doesn’t have to be your full delivery. When you are able to see the forearm pop up, and you feel that humerus rotating in the socket then take a video and see if you can transfer it. If this is what you’re working on, the front view is your friend, we want to see the forearm vertical and the scaps pinched back behind the acromial line

go as slow as you have to in front of the mirror to see if your fundamental movement pattern will allow you to even get in this position. I spent time going through video of high level guys frame by frame and trying to recreate that same arm path…in the end that was one of the key things that helped me

Take video of a side view of you throwing catch. Take note of how
relaxed you are, how comfortable you are at breaking the hands and
how easy you step forward with your stride leg. Also take note of
your rhythm – smooth, no stopping then starting, little if any leg
lift, no coil and uncoil, and so forth.
If you can possibly set two (2) TV’s side by side, play each video
at the same time and write down the major differences in style,
what you can take from the simple motions of catch and incorporate
into your pitching cycle.
Basically, you’re dealing with tradeoffs here. Those tradeoffs involve
stability Vs. velocity. In that regard, although this media has its limitations,
I’ve listed below some of the things to consider with these kinds of
tradeoffs: (these listings are for fundamental training only and not designed
for pitchers who have formal postures and routines firmly developed. Also,
your body type –physique, muscle maturity, etc., will impact your interpretations
and performances )
TRADEOFFS BETWEEN STABILITY AND VELOCITY
 Lower leg lift increases stability, reduces forward
momentum and drive, faster forward momentum and drive increase
velocity.
 Lower leg lift increases stability, reduces weight driving
down on the stride foot’s plant.
 Shoulders slightly bent forward with the leg lift,
increases stability, reduces stride leg/foot plant on a direct
line off the pivot foot and has body
pitching across itself, reducing velocity.
 Delayed breaking of the hands increases stability,
reduces the velocity by having the pitching arm trying to
catch up with the forward momentum of the body driving
forward*
[color=red]*This is the most difficult part of the pitching cycle and takes
considerable time to find your optimum timing for break the
hands.[/color]

Coach B.

I made this video today. I did this drill over and over again. I believe this is extremely close to the arm action that I need to have. All three of these reps were right after each other, so I think that I’m beginning to get my arm action where it needs to be.

You can all weigh in. Let me know what you think.

Thanks!

I pm’d Paul several weeks ago and haven’t got a response. I don’t think he has been here for a while.

I would suggest raising your glove arm a little higher, stretch out you
glove hand and allow your shoulders to roll:
- glove hand’s thumb points out slightly as you extend
that glove out, then as you point your glove hand’s thumb
down, roll your glove side shoulder slightly to accomodate
your glove side elbow going down and in … as you exchange
your pitching arm’s shoulder moving forward and point that
pitching arm’s shoulder to your target.

If I watched you play catch, I wouldn’t be surprised if that’s
exactly what you do, naturally.

Coach B.

I just noticed my glove side. It usually is up much more. It probably was done there because I was focusing on my throwing arm. I do believe that it is up much more naturally.

I feel like to get that arm action in that video that I let my throwing arm rotate my shoulders forward. I don’t think that I literally did that, but I think that allowed my shoulders to stay closed longer and my arm to get up more.

To me, I don’t see my arm ER-ing much more. I think that over time my arm will more once I start doing this on a regular basis, but I’m not expert on the issue, so I don’t know.

Lanky, I have been doing lots of ‘mirror’ reps in my room once I discovered a cabinet that has a mirror in the back of it. I have also been doing one of dry rep drill where I stand close to a wall(butt facing that wall) and go throw my motion. I tab my throwing arm on the wall to make sure that it gets up properly before opening my shoulders and rotating forward.

Let me know what you guys think! Thanks in advance!

not a fan of the wall drill. Maybe I’m picturing it wrong but why would you want to limit your scap loading by putting a wall right behind you?

Not directly behind me, just close to it. I have to load my scap and get my arm up in order for it to touch.

What do you think of the new video?

lets see one where you’re starting with your lead shoulder facing the target

I will do that tomorrow, but just from an arm action stand point, do you think that is a good level of external roatation and gernal motion?

Wow…Keep it simple bro.

What’s your goal with arm action? Is it to get the arm moving faster? Is it to please your eyes based on your view or others on this board???

Answer this question first and then find ways:

  1. What’s the intent or purpose
  2. How can you measure this?
  3. Pick one area and only one area. Narrow your focus!!!

It drives me crazy when I see advice given that pitchers need to do this and do that and oh, by the way you also need to do that. Great, maybe you do. However, it will never happen if you are trying to accomplish multiple tasks simultaneously.

I see that your arm redirects slowly, but that’s my opinion. It’s different than others. Trust what you feel and what you measure and go with that.

If you want the arm to move faster, get the body to move faster. Keep it simple, leave the physics/kinesiology/anatomy, etc… in the lab setting.

My goal is for my arm to continuously move and to external rotate.

Which is really one goal because you can’t really ‘try’ to external rotate.

I made a new video today. I focused on ‘flipping’ my arm up into position and it seemed to give me good external rotation. It felt kind of weird, but probably because I’ve never done it before.

Let me know what you think.

Jimster,

You’re looking very fluid and relaxed - excellent. To complete this motion with your shoulders adding to your upper movement, exchange your shoulders more, the pitching shoulder coming all the way and around, deliberately pointing to your target, with your glove shoulder followng suit - pointing away from your target.

Don’t forget the finishing touch - make sure your glove side elbow extends back, extending beyond the flush side of your back.

Finishing off like this will allow your shoulders to be " in the pitch", not an after thought. You’ll also start to feel more of your mid section muscles helping the cause too.

I’ve got to hand it to your Jimster, you’re taking it upon yourself to develop, to improve and stay healthy at the same time. This all takes a lot of time and dedication. It won’t pop up over night. Stay with it, you’re doing fine.

Coach B.

[quote=“Coach Baker”]Jimster,

You’re looking very fluid and relaxed - excellent. To complete this motion with your shoulders adding to your upper movement, exchange your shoulders more, the pitching shoulder coming all the way and around, deliberately pointing to your target, with your glove shoulder followng suit - pointing away from your target.

Don’t forget the finishing touch - make sure your glove side elbow extends back, extending beyond the flush side of your back.

Finishing off like this will allow your shoulders to be " in the pitch", not an after thought. You’ll also start to feel more of your mid section muscles helping the cause too.

I’ve got to hand it to your Jimster, you’re taking it upon yourself to develop, to improve and stay healthy at the same time. This all takes a lot of time and dedication. It won’t pop up over night. Stay with it, you’re doing fine.

Coach B.[/quote]

Thanks for the kind words. And you’re right that it doesn’t happen over night. There’s always that point where it finally ‘clicks’ but that’s over many, many, many attempts.

I’m must amazed that my arm external rotates now. Just a short time ago, I couldn’t get it go any further back than you can normal bend it. You can see evidence of that in older videos.

It will be more hard work to translate this arm action to my full pitching motion. But heck I could get my arm to bend almost 90 degrees more than it could before, I’m sure I can get it do it while I throw full speed.

I some extra drill work after my light long toss to reniforce my new arm action.

I think that I can get my arm up sooner, but I’m still getting good ER, so that’s the main goal.

Let me know what you think, thanks!