Arm Action in LLWS

This week i’m doing a feature on the LLWS and today’s post was about arm action. Very simple and brief but would love to hear the guys on this board’s opinion.

https://baseballthinktank.com/little-league-world-series-2012-cultural-differences

watched a bunch of it, and it made me wonder if a lot of the premier talent has blown off LL for Showcase.

Yeah I was watching a few games from the LLWS and every team had 1 or 2 bigger, more dominant players. When I was watching the world series for some other organization like USSSA, I saw teams with much bigger kids, all of the pitchers were in the 70’s and one or two in the 80’s. Not to mention the field dimensions were much larger.

No doubt

I think your comparison is at such a slow frame rate that it’s meaningless. All pitchers come to the “L” position, you’re not seeing it in the Japan pitcher because that frame is skipped.

On the other hand, I’m not sure the “L” position should be stressed… I think all pitchers do it anyway.

[quote=“bbrages”]I think your comparison is at such a slow frame rate that it’s meaningless. All pitchers come to the “L” position, you’re not seeing it in the Japan pitcher because that frame is skipped.

On the other hand, I’m not sure the “L” position should be stressed… I think all pitchers do it anyway.[/quote]

I see your point but maybe I need to make mIne more clear. The arm action is clearly different regardless of frame rate. The American is hand dominate (L drill guy) versus the other 2 that rely on an elbow driven action. All pitchers that are in a position to throw get the hand above the elbow but that’s only a part of the journey and not the destination.

Interesting post. Yes, everyone gets to the L position, but it’s just a point in the throwing motion, and you move right through it. In my opinion, while getting to a good position at front foot plant is critical, “the L” is not something to be stressed. By focusing on drills that emphasize specific points in the pitching motion rather than focusing on movements and the pitching motion as a whole we rob kids of natural athleticism and kill momentum.

Well said, my point exactly

Nice article think, interesting thoughts.

Phil R., you’ve got it right on the button!
I’ve never played or even watched little league—my viewpoint is strictly major league—but I know where this is coming from. Too many coaches, at all levels, can’t—or won’t—see the forest for the trees; they start out with little bits and pieces instead of getting the whole picture and then zeroing in on what might need to be addressed. As a result, the poor pitcher is so focused on the minutiae that he has no idea how to put the pieces together again. And what about those coaches who absolutely insist that their pitchers throw over the top, as if this were the be-all and the end-all, never stopping to consider what arm slot (arm angle) is comfortable and makes for more effective pitching? Huh? HUH?
As a kid I picked up on a lot of things from watching the Yankee pitchers in action, worked around with them and incorporated them into what I considered a good pitching delivery. One thing I recognized early on was that I would never be a rip-roarin’ 97MPH fireballer, so rather than knocking myself out trying to do the impossible I went in the other direction and acquired a few good breaking and offspeed pitches and became a good finesse pitcher. And I was lucky; in my mid-teens, because I was curious about the slider, I asked one of those Yankee pitchers—Eddie Lopat—about it. His response was to take me aside and teach me how to throw a good one; he watched me as I was familiarizing myself with the easier wrist action that comes with it, and he made some mental notes—about the fact that I was a natural, true sidearmer with a consistent release point, used a slide-step all the time (which made it all but impossible for baserunners to get a good jump), and threw strikes, goody goody. This led to his becoming my de facto pitching coach for almost four years, and the things I learned from him were nothing short of priceless. He helped me become a better pitcher than I had been before, and the way he went about it was to show me some things I could do with this and that—a bit of troubleshooting here and there, like the problem I had with my circle change—and incorporating these things into my overall pitching. He believed that this was how you do it: start out by seeing what a pitcher has and can do and then focus on what might need some tweaking, not putting the cart before the horse!
There should be more like him. 8)