Are you overtraining?

I have been pondering this all day after re-reading an article by Jason Ferruggia. His article was titled " Are you overtraining." I think that was the title anyways here comes my rant.
Today I did a leg workout that was awesome. Heres the workout.

High object jumps 2 sets of 10 rest 2 min.
Rythmic Lunge Jumps 1 set of 10 per leg rest 1min
Depth Jumps 3sets of 5 2 min rest.
Barbell Jump squats 10% of max squat 3sets of 12 2 min rest
Romanian Deadlift 2sets of 6 3 min rest
Squat 2 set of 6 3 min rest.

Had a great workout. Now in Jason’s article he talked about overtraining. I am no where near overtraining myself. But I think that alot of pitchers on this site might be. Think about all the ab exercises everyone does and talks about. Also look at all of the arm exercises everyone does. Now hey if you throw 90 and it worked for you great but why the need for all the volume.

Also think about all the stimulus your legs get when you run sprints and then go do a leg workout. Thats alot of CNS wear and tear.
Stay with me I know I am ranting.

Then you go and do your upperbody workout and there is even more CNS wear and tear. Also I bet there is a slim chance anyone on here is recovering the way they should. So where do you make your gains in strength and velocity.

I played with a guy that signed with the Blue Jays he never workout out just threw and did some ab stuff here and there and did some arm care exercises. He went from 83 to 93 in a year of college ball. He did nothing else. Was he tired the next day from practice probably not. Did his arm hurt sometimes I talked with him about it. It bothered him sometimes. But the thing is he did less than everyone else but still managed to gain the most velocity out of anybody on the team.

I dont know maybe the old saying of less is more is right. Maybe next time you go squat maybe 2 sets of 10 is better than 3 sets of 10. Or maybe 1 set of 10 is better. How about instead of 10 exercises for your arm maybe 5. How about instead of 20 minutes of throwing 5 is better or 8 minutes is better. How about a less complex workout, maybe something simple.

Anyways thats my rant I probably confused alot of people. My point probably didnt get across really clear. Hopefully someone got what I was saying. I dont know anyways google the article by Jason and maybe you will get what I’m saying. Ok I’m done.

I think that you hit on a very good point ChadM.

I think the thing to remember when your doing workouts is to have a quality session consisting of quality reps. Never compromise quality for quantity.

You also have to remember that some people naturally will get better with minimal effort because of growth.

I think that younger athletes can get away with more volume in there workouts because there bodies are better at recovering. Also any workout a younger athlete does will produce results. When you get older though I dont think you should do as much volume because you cant recover as well. It should be more specialized and like Hammer said quality reps. Also quality exercises.

Normally you’ll start to see performance drop-offs when you are overtraining. This can be in the weight room, such as drop offs in the amount you can lift, or on the athletic field, losses in speed, power, or velocity.

I can agree with some of the things you said Chad. Players need to make adjustments to their strength training schedules to account for increased amounts of throwing, running, etc. This will vary person to person.

I think your example of the guy that never lifted and threw 93 was a bit skewed. There are plenty of guys that can make it on talent alone, but it eventually catches up with them. Look at Griffey Jr., he bragged about how he never spent any time strength training but his body has failed him numerous times as he aged.

For the average player, strength training is going to help them get better.

[quote]Also think about all the stimulus your legs get when you run sprints and then go do a leg workout. Thats alot of CNS wear and tear.
[/quote]

Whats CNS stand for??

Central Nervous System I do believe.

i think that i definitely have overtrained for baseball while trying to make velocity gains. a year ago, i made really big gains while only doing weighted ball training and rotator cuff strengthening exercises. over the summer, i mixed weighted ball workouts, weight lifting, yoga, elastic tubing, and plyometrics and made no velocity gains.

it’s tough to choose a training program since there’s so much out there to do. i think that the most important thing is just to throw in any way possible.

[quote=“Samo_292”]i think that i definitely have overtrained for baseball while trying to make velocity gains. a year ago, i made really big gains while only doing weighted ball training and rotator cuff strengthening exercises. over the summer, i mixed weighted ball workouts, weight lifting, yoga, elastic tubing, and plyometrics and made no velocity gains.

it’s tough to choose a training program since there’s so much out there to do. i think that the most important thing is just to throw in any way possible.[/quote]

I don’t think you over trained at all. You don’t always make velocity gains. Especially if you use weighted balls. I’m not even going to get into those because I just plain don’t like them.

My normal program is this: Physical Therapy (The Thrower’s 10), Throwing Program (House), Workout 1 (Calisthenics/Plyometrics - House), Workout 2 (“Weight Lifting” - House), Conditioning (House) and then sometimes I even mix in a game of football, basketball, or soccer. You have to try to over train. It’s very difficult to do. I wouldn’t worry much about over training if I was mostly anybody here. I’d worry about doing enough training…