Are Roger Clemens mechanics consistant with the House model?

I’m not exactly sure if he fits the NPA’s model exactly just from an eyed observation. Is there any information on the mechanics of Clemens (besides that of Chris O’Leary’s)?

Clemens’ mechanics has changed over the course of his career. I assume you meant his “most current” mechanics?

I do mean his current or most recent mechanics. I have a hard time seeing the NPA model (outside of guys like Prior) in most pitchers, but apparently that’s how the model was derived at.

I think I’m pretty similar to Clemens mechanically, but there are obviously some differences. I want to know if my differences are good (for lack of a better word) in comparison to Clemens. I hope to post a video soon for this observation and critique.

Also, the most difficult thing for me to understand is what (at least) Chris O’leary calls “leaving your foot behind on the rubber.” How is your post leg supposed to turn inward before you land with your other foot? Its something I really struggle with (despite seeing the Kevin Brown clip about a million times). What advice or tips are there concerning this “key” to velocity as Chris has pointed out?

I think it has to do with not pushing off the mound but gaining momentum with your body instead of using your leg to “push off”. This could be completely off but that is what I see from that clip. For your specific question it might have to do with he isn’t actually turning over before he lands, but it almost looks that he is in the air or just the point where he transfers to his front foot. Your right it is hard to see, maby Chris can tackle this better.

How familiar are you with the NPA’s current model?

Well I pretty much know the logistics of the model. I know the steps and a little bit about them. Do you ask this question because he is like a perfect prototype of the model? I was just curious, more than anything, until I get a video of myself up.

My other question is probably more important right now. The one about leaving your foot behind on the rubber.

No, that wasn’t a pointed question. I was just trying to figure out what it is you’re really comparing Clemens to. It’s been my experience that most folks who know anything about House’s teachings know about his older teachings - not his current teachings. I’d say Clemens does fit the current NPA model reasonably well.

As for “leaving your foot behind on the rubber”, I’m not familiar with that terminology. If I had to guess, I’d say it is a symptom of a lack of momentum.

[quote=“Hutch”]…the most difficult thing for me to understand is what (at least) Chris O’leary calls “leaving your foot behind on the rubber.” [/quote]Join the club. :reallyconfused: I also don’t put much stock in his recommendations anyway.

[quote=“Hutch”]How is your post leg supposed to turn inward before you land with your other foot? Its something I really struggle with (despite seeing the Kevin Brown clip about a million times). What advice or tips are there concerning this “key” to velocity as Chris has pointed out?[/quote]So Chris is saying what about this “key to velocity”?

About the back leg, some say it just reacts to everything else happening, others say you must pull that knee forward and inward to assist with hip rotation (don’t get me started on that one again), others say it pushes and some say it plays a role in rotating off the rubber. We could start a month long thread on this one and really get nowhere at the end of it all.

I lean toward the back leg playing a significant role. I’m not big in the push camp, although I believe there is a function of that sort happening. I prefer to look at things more holistically and look at the back leg as part of a “tag team” with the core. Try not to over-analyze it too much. Focus on momentum generation early on and, with the timing of guys like Brown or Nolan Ryan, spin the back leg (the knee turns under, not forward), fire the core and rotate off the rubber into landing. Study those pros for timing elements. The spinning of the back knee under during extension of the femur (the angle between the femur and the hip changes here) is so common in high level pitchers. Just be careful not to “chunk” things into little bits so much that the motion becomes dis-jointed and jerky. The reason I show Brown so much is because of the “fluidity” of it all with such impeccable timing. Everything just flows up the chain, more like a wave.

All Chris O’ Leary says is that leaving your foot behind on the rubber (meaning it would still be in contact with the rubber when you’re releasing the ball) will decrease how much your hips rotate, therefore decreasing velocity. You can see the back foot dragging naturally in pictures of Greg Maddux and Tim Lincecum. When Randy Johnson releases the ball, his foot is off the rubber slightly. When Nate Robertson releases it, his foot is way off.

The post foot being off or on the rubber is dependent upon your amount of flexibility and momentum among other things. There is no absolute way.