Any good med ball workouts


#1

does anone know any good med ball workouts to gain velocity and to do by yourself without a partner


#2

What drills do you do with the balls?


#3

you can youtube it, or go to pitcherspowerdrive.com, they have some sample videos of using a medball for core

also drivelinebaseball.com kyleb shows some medball stuff to work the shoulder and core in sync

the key to medball training is making SURE you are using your drive leg and hips to propel the ball, your arms are simply there to hold it

i could tell you some medball stuff like wood choppers and such, but its best if you do some research and look at the form to make sure you get 100% out of the effort you put in


#4

Med ball weights are too light to build muscle. It is literally impossible to go to true failure with those exercises.


#5

Training to failure isn’t necessary in any program.


#6

pitchers dont necessarily need to build muscle, we need fast twitch and explosive muscles

medballs provide the ability to "pitch"without having to use the arm, you can work on driving and torque


#7

It’s like the blind leading the blind on here lol


#8

looks like youre the only one cant hasnt taken the blindfold off yet^^

medball can do great to build rotational functional strength… you can also go through your delievery and use the forces from your legs, hips, and torso to toss the medball without having to throw

link from PPD


#9

lol that link was a joke. I will stick with the Nautilus rotary torso machine that actually takes you to true failure.

Also to huskie18- You need a scientifically proven program bud, such as Doug McGuff’s “Body by Science”


#10

doing that work on that joke of a link i went from 78-80 to 83-86

its not about going to failure, pitchers are not power lifters or body builders lol… its about functional strength and intricate timing of the bodys largest muscles

theres a time to train to failure, but this thread doesnt concern that


#11

Med Ball work is used to increase rate of force development - which is something different then maximal strength. Pitching is an anerobic activity in that the entire activity occurs in less than a second - so a strong pitcher that can’t use his strength efficiently to generate force in a split second is no better than a weaker pitcher that is more efficient at generating forces with his weaker muscles.

Med Ball work “trains” rate of force development - while general strength training improves maximal strength - you need to train both! The training goal is to have more muscle that you can recruit in an instant. Tuff-Cuff has some good med ball workouts, Woolforth’s Combat Pitching has some as well, you can search the web and find others if you want.


#12

[quote=“TheUnDiscovered”]lol that link was a joke. I will stick with the Nautilus rotary torso machine that actually takes you to true failure.

Also to huskie18- You need a scientifically proven program bud, such as Doug McGuff’s “Body by Science”[/quote]

You need to understand kid that your country club health manual will only get you so far. I don’t need that crap of a book, look at the guy who wrote it, he is a nobody in the strength and conditioning field. What athletes has he trained? What have they done?

Your what in high school? I’m playing professionally and know a lot more about training than you do. There will be no nautilus machines when you get to college, that is crap. Machines only create dysfunction on top of dysfunction. Maybe if you trained at a REAL gym with REAL athletes you would understand.


#13

www.coreperformance.com

browse around and you should find what you are looking for.


#14

[quote=“tonyjh34”]www.coreperformance.com
browse around and you should find what you are looking for.[/quote]

Good website there, tonyjh34.
Thanks for posting it.


#15

[quote=“huskie18”][quote=“TheUnDiscovered”]lol that link was a joke. I will stick with the Nautilus rotary torso machine that actually takes you to true failure.

Also to huskie18- You need a scientifically proven program bud, such as Doug McGuff’s “Body by Science”[/quote]

You need to understand kid that your country club health manual will only get you so far. I don’t need that crap of a book, look at the guy who wrote it, he is a nobody in the strength and conditioning field. What athletes has he trained? What have they done?

Your what in high school? I’m playing professionally and know a lot more about training than you do. There will be no nautilus machines when you get to college, that is crap. Machines only create dysfunction on top of dysfunction. Maybe if you trained at a REAL gym with REAL athletes you would understand.[/quote]

Enlighten me on how machines create “dysfunction”. The fact of the matter is your muscles deal only with force-production requirements, which, in turn, are determined by the resistance to which the muscles are exposed- whether that resistance comes in the form of a free weight, a Nautilus machine, or a bucket of rocks. Why would you want to be pinned under a barbell at the point of muscular failure on free weight exercises such as bench press or squat. Since machines are safer and are at least as efficient as free weights at stimulating muscles, why take the risk of injury???

-Also what about the fact that Nautilus or MedX machines feature correct cam profiles that vary the resistance in accord with the strength curves of the muscles being trained. Muscles have differing levels of strength throughout the their range of motion, which free weights can’t accomodate.


#16

[quote=“tonyjh34”]www.coreperformance.com
browse around and you should find what you are looking for.[/quote]

I tried some of the exercises
on www.coreperformance.com.
They really work your body.
Pitchers (or any baseball player) who are interested in
strengthening their muscles and improving body flexibility
should definitely look into that site.


#17

[quote=“TheUnDiscovered”]Enlighten me on how machines create “dysfunction”. The fact of the matter is your muscles deal only with force-production requirements, which, in turn, are determined by the resistance to which the muscles are exposed- whether that resistance comes in the form of a free weight, a Nautilus machine, or a bucket of rocks. Why would you want to be pinned under a barbell at the point of muscular failure on free weight exercises such as bench press or squat. Since machines are safer and are at least as efficient as free weights at stimulating muscles, why take the risk of injury???

-Also what about the fact that Nautilus or MedX machines feature correct cam profiles that vary the resistance in accord with the strength curves of the muscles being trained. Muscles have differing levels of strength throughout the their range of motion, which free weights can’t accomodate.[/quote]
Maybe I can shed some light on the situation. Machines, versus free weights, create a physical dysfunction within the athlete. A heavier weight that is made up of free weights, done completely by the athlete, puts stress on the musculoskeletal system which actually more naturally builds the body as a whole. Most people do not realize how important the body should be build as a whole is, and why in fact it should be done. The machines create stress that is distributed on the machine and not the whole body, thus creating physical imbalances within the athlete.

The reason why machines are ‘safer’ is because most lifters never have been coached on how to use any form of weights. Since free weights use the whole body, you can easily misdirect weight onto a single part of your body and that will cause multiple issues. Being 'pinned under a barbell is different than lifting to muscle failure. When you lift to muscle failure, you actually, if properly setup, will have the system setup properly so the bar can only fall so far. For most, this is setup so the bar can go slightly below each persons negative rep.

There is no substitute for the stress that squats, bench, cleans, etc put on your body. It is a good stress that forces you to be sound. Otherwise you quickly create imbalances. It is easier to imbalance yourself as an athlete with machines.

Free weights can accommodate the difference in strength throughout the motion. Have you ever squatted with bands or chains for example? It provides more force initially and the further down you get the less for is exerted. This actually allows you to be more explosive than if you used a machine.

You do not have to take my word for it. Ask any professional trainer. Ask Tom House even. Or Nolan Ryan. Or my college Strength and Conditioning Coach. They all say the same thing.


#18

[quote=“CSOleson”][quote=“TheUnDiscovered”]Enlighten me on how machines create “dysfunction”. The fact of the matter is your muscles deal only with force-production requirements, which, in turn, are determined by the resistance to which the muscles are exposed- whether that resistance comes in the form of a free weight, a Nautilus machine, or a bucket of rocks. Why would you want to be pinned under a barbell at the point of muscular failure on free weight exercises such as bench press or squat. Since machines are safer and are at least as efficient as free weights at stimulating muscles, why take the risk of injury???

-Also what about the fact that Nautilus or MedX machines feature correct cam profiles that vary the resistance in accord with the strength curves of the muscles being trained. Muscles have differing levels of strength throughout the their range of motion, which free weights can’t accomodate.[/quote]
Maybe I can shed some light on the situation. Machines, versus free weights, create a physical dysfunction within the athlete. A heavier weight that is made up of free weights, done completely by the athlete, puts stress on the musculoskeletal system which actually more naturally builds the body as a whole. Most people do not realize how important the body should be build as a whole is, and why in fact it should be done. The machines create stress that is distributed on the machine and not the whole body, thus creating physical imbalances within the athlete.

The reason why machines are ‘safer’ is because most lifters never have been coached on how to use any form of weights. Since free weights use the whole body, you can easily misdirect weight onto a single part of your body and that will cause multiple issues. Being 'pinned under a barbell is different than lifting to muscle failure. When you lift to muscle failure, you actually, if properly setup, will have the system setup properly so the bar can only fall so far. For most, this is setup so the bar can go slightly below each persons negative rep.

There is no substitute for the stress that squats, bench, cleans, etc put on your body. It is a good stress that forces you to be sound. Otherwise you quickly create imbalances. It is easier to imbalance yourself as an athlete with machines.

Free weights can accommodate the difference in strength throughout the motion. Have you ever squatted with bands or chains for example? It provides more force initially and the further down you get the less for is exerted. This actually allows you to be more explosive than if you used a machine.

You do not have to take my word for it. Ask any professional trainer. Ask Tom House even. Or Nolan Ryan. Or my college Strength and Conditioning Coach. They all say the same thing.[/quote]

This is coming from a kid who thows 74 mph. I’m thowing 87 on the stalker and I do my workout with machines. lol

The more I’m on this site the more I see the truth in the famous quote “You can lead a horse to water but you can’t make it drink”


#19

Wow 87?!?! :roll:. Keep working out on the machines buddy. Just because he doesn’t throw hard doesn’t mean he doesn’t know what he is talking about.


#20

for all we know hes probably 80-84, dont listen to internet boosting
besides 87 from the right side is so common down here in the south, takes 91-95 to get drafted down here, 86-88 for a lefty

there is no subsitute for free weights… they use more muscles at once than natilus