Analyze my Mechanics Please


#1

I top out at about 84 and i miss the plate by inches whether its outside inside high or low. I know theres more in my body to throw faster because I can just feel that everything is not getting let out. So if you guys can just tear these mechanics apart would be appreciated.

Video is at

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8444772852659273337

    Thanks

#2

To me it looks like you aren’t using your legs enough. Your upper body loks good but when it comes time to push off it seems as if you are just"going through the motions" You need to be explosive off your back leg . That should help add some mph


#3

I wouldn’t necessarily say he needs to be more explosive with his legs.
He’s pitching on flat ground so you can’t get your legs into it as much (IMO).
Also generally if someone is consciencously thinking to explode with their legs they often rush, which messes up everything.


#4

i think he might be rushing a little bit. maybe keep the upper body weight back a little more.


#5

I think your mechanics look pretty good. If you’re wanting to increase your velocity via a mechanical adjustment then my suggestion would be to delay your shoulder rotation a bit longer and then explode. But this will require a change to your glove arm. Specifically, you need to not pull your glove to your side. Instead, you need to get your arms into an opposite and equal position at foot strike, leave the glove out over the front foot, and bring the torso to the glove. This will do two things. First, it will give you the timing you need to delay shoulder rotation. Second, it will give you time for your torso to track further towards home plate which, in turn, will let you get your release point closer to home plate. This increases your “perceived velocity” which reduces the time the batter has to see and react to the ball. Every 4 inches closer is equivalent to throwing 1mph faster.


#6

Roger. I’m going to assume that you really mean that the UPPER arms should be positioned equal and opposite at footstrike. If I recall correctly, you and I spoke of this before, and you clarified this at that time. My point being that, at footstrike, if the ARMS are truly equal and opposite, the glove and lower arm would be pointing upward, in somewhat of a “goalpost” position which is not the appropriate position at footstrike.


#7

Any videos that you can send that shows how this is done? I think i do need to delay shoulder rotation more however when i try i get a little pain in the back of my shoulder. Is this a timing issue or just trying to delay for too long?

       Keep the suggestions coming in
                                  Thanks

#8

Roger. I’m going to assume that you really mean that the UPPER arms should be positioned equal and opposite at footstrike. If I recall correctly, you and I spoke of this before, and you clarified this at that time. My point being that, at footstrike, if the ARMS are truly equal and opposite, the glove and lower arm would be pointing upward, in somewhat of a “goalpost” position which is not the appropriate position at footstrike.[/quote]
DM, you are correct. The upper arms need to be aligned and mirror each other. The forearms can both be up, both be straight, both be down, one be up and the other down, etc. From a balance perspective, you want the forearms and hands and ball/glove equi-distant from the body. Imagine walking a tightrope - you need to keep the weight evenly spread out. (The glitch here is that the average glove weighs 2-3 times what the ball weighs. This is why so many young kids develop the habit of dropping the glove.)

Remember that this opposite and equal thing only happens for a short moment at foot strike. To hold that position for an artifically long period of time would be awkward and would mess up timing.

But, speaking of timing, that is the other reason for opposite and equal. When pitchers do otherwise, they mess up their timing. In the video posted above, it looked to me like the pitcher pulled his glove to his side and that caused him to prematurely spin out of his shoulder delay. So, in order to delay shoulder rotation, he’s got to give himself the timing to do so. I feel the fix is in his glove arm.

Tom House teaches leaving the glove out over the front foot and bringing the torso to it. As part of this, the glove it flipped over so the palm faces the pitcher and the glove arm firms up to create a stable base to throw against. So far, I’ve not discrovered any reason to refute this. A stable front side does seem to help with consistency.


#9

[quote=“Billy2001”]Any videos that you can send that shows how this is done? I think i do need to delay shoulder rotation more however when i try i get a little pain in the back of my shoulder. Is this a timing issue or just trying to delay for too long?

       Keep the suggestions coming in
                                  Thanks[/quote]

Have you tried increasing the delay using the glove arm fix I suggested? If not, then you’re trying to fold yourself in half. That is, you’re trying to keep your throwing side back while your glove side is spinning out.

BTW, yes this is definitely a timing issue. My take on your video was that you don’t give youself the timing necessary to further delay shoulder rotation. To delay shoulder rotation longer requires a timing adjustment. Now you may find that as you do this you’ll start to feel it in some part of your body. That’s ok as long as it is just muscle soreness. In fact, it’s probably to be expected. Such soreness is an indication of a lack of functional strength to perform that part of the mechanics. It should improve over time. And there are drills you can do to work on this and get through it faster.


#10

Okay i’ve tried this method and i find the ball has a little more on it when i throw it but i miss high a lot with it. Should i be moving myself to the glove while in the side position or move it once i have my chest facing the plate?

Also i have seen that rotating off my back leg quicker forces me to get around quicker which gets my arm moving quicker resulting in more velocity. Now is this the correct way of doing it or should I not be tinkering with the rotation of my back foot?
Thanks


#11

Well, if you’ve only given this a shot between my previous post and now, then I think you haven’t really given it enough time to be able to adjust to it. Stick with it a bit longer and see how it goes. Few things in pitching improve over night.

Regarding moving to the glove, it pretty much starts about the time the shoulders start to rotate. But I wouldn’t focus to much on the “when”. Instead, focus on swiveling the glove and firming up the glove arm instead of pulling it to the side.

[quote=“Billy2001”]Also i have seen that rotating off my back leg quicker forces me to get around quicker which gets my arm moving quicker resulting in more velocity. Now is this the correct way of doing it or should I not be tinkering with the rotation of my back foot?
Thanks[/quote]
I don’t think you should be thinking about the back leg with one exception. Your back foot should turn over and drag and not lift off the ground until after you release the ball. If your back foot is lifting off the ground before you release the ball, then you’re not keeping your spine upright for as long as you should.