Analyze my Mechanics Please (4 videos)


#1

I am a Senior and I have a lot of problems with my mechanics but Im not sure what all of them are. When I throw long toss I can launch a ball about 310 to 325 feet. I read in an article that if you can throw a ball about 306 feet you have the tools to throw about 90 mph. When I throw long toss everything feels good and my body flows together, but once I take the mound and pitch I feel very uncomfortable. The ball doesnt come out of my hand right. Instead of rolling off the tips of my fingers, it seems like it flys out of my hand. And I can tell just by feel that my velocity is so much slower when pitching then throwing long toss or when I turn two at second when playing shortstop. Turning two at second I get a very good hip and shoulder rotation thats probably why I throw a lot harder. Here are 4 videos please anylyze and leave feedback thanks:

Rear View-

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-5437763849778548659

Rear View slow motion-

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=2029783980182175474

Side View-

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-3810603362692173126

Side View slow motion-

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4891858507493023528


#2

yahoo videos are so hard to use…but i think it would be a lot different if you were on a mound…it looks like you dont stride very much…you look very uprite when you pitch…also your arm dosent have much whip action to it…seams very straight, i think your timing looks fine, looks pretty good i’d say


#3

try doing exactly what you do in long toss , because i doubt you coulst throw 306 ft with ur back so upright. It looks to me like ur mostly just throwing with your arm. try taking a longer stride and when you go to throw " try to touch the ground"


#4

I’m too lazy to look at videos, but when you throw, at your follow-through, make sure your right leg (if you’re a righty) doesn’t come across your left. I fixed that kink and it feels much more natural to me.

Again, I don’t know what you do, but that’s an indication of over throwing which will make you uncomfortable.


#5

whats arm whip action.


#6

It’s exactly what it implies. Instead of you pushing your arm out , you arm becomes a whip and slingshots threw


#7

could someone post a video of someone with very good arm whip action. or email it to me at sunnydhaliwal@alltel.net


#8

i can explain it to you because finding a good video can be tough…stop your video when your about to throw it, if your shoulder to your hand is straight, its not good whip, the hand should trail the elbow


#9

so the hand should be still flexed behind the elbow when releasing the ball. So if Im releasing with the shoulder, elbow, and hand aligned with each other, then i need to throw my elbow out in front more to get better whip right


#10

sounds like you know what your talking about, now, if you want advice on how to really correct it, i’d suggest pm’in dm52 , he knows how to help this


#11

[quote=“Dippy2006”]…so the hand should be still flexed behind the elbow when releasing the ball.[/quote]Nope. Definitely not.

[quote=“Dippy2006”]So if Im releasing with the shoulder, elbow, and hand aligned with each other, then i need to throw my elbow out in front more to get better whip right[/quote]Dippy. I got your pm and I’ll send you some stuff. The elbow and shoulder lead the hand from the high cocked position until the shoulders are squared to the plate. You don’t need to be thinking too much about the hand taking a certain path at this point. It’ll only mess things up if you think this way. As the hand reaches (and goes through, with no pauses) the high cocked position, the shoulders rotate hard and the elbow comes around with it. Along with the body’s forward motion, the shoulder and elbow leading will “drag” the hand down, around, up and over to release and beyond. The arm must be “rag loose” for this whipping action to happen and the timing of the parts must be there. If you try to think “I’ve got to lay the forearm back”, you’re barking up the wrong tree.

Like I said, I’ll send you some video and maybe more description.


#12

I don’t have time to analyze the videos at the moment but I wanted to comment on the above statement. An infielder that is trying to turn a double play has no time to waste. He’s got to do things quickly or he doesn’t get the 2nd out. Assuming good footwork, the upper body pretty much takes care of itself - arms opposite an equal, properly timed rotation, no dropping of the glove, etc.

Pitchers, on the other hand, are not forced to be quick so they often take their time. Many times they take too much time and that leads to problems. The trick then is to adjust the mechanics to eliminate the wasted time that causes problems.

I’ll try to review the videos tomorrow.


#13

I don’t have time to analyze the videos at the moment but I wanted to comment on the above statement. An infielder that is trying to turn a double play has no time to waste. He’s got to do things quickly or he doesn’t get the 2nd out. Assuming good footwork, the upper body pretty much takes care of itself - arms opposite an equal, properly timed rotation, no dropping of the glove, etc.

Pitchers, on the other hand, are not forced to be quick so they often take their time. Many times they take too much time and that leads to problems. The trick then is to adjust the mechanics to eliminate the wasted time that causes problems.

I’ll try to review the videos tomorrow.[/quote]

That’s a very good point. I used to be real slow getting up onto my balance leg and then going home. I’ve since made it quicker, and my accuracy and velocity have picked up. I mean, you don’t want to rush yourself, but you also don’t want to become lazy.


#14

Ok, I finally found time to review the videos. Here’s what I spotted:

(1) The initial side step at the start of the deliver creates a lot of unnecesary movement of your head and body - too much for my liking. I have my pitchers take a small step forward just enough to help them rotate and plant the pivot foot against the rubber.

(2) It appears you first look straight down, then down but out a few feet in front of you, and then at the target. This means your eyes are having to refocus 3 times during your delivery. Try to lock your eyes on your target from the get-go and leave them there.

(3) You have a big dip at the start of your stride and your torso leans back. This also creates unnecessary head movement.

(4) Your knee lift looks fine and you appear to lead with the hips.

(5) You plant on a fairly straight front leg.

(6) You don’t necessarily pull your glove to your side but it ends up at your side and just kind of flops around a bit.

(7) You have little to no delay between hip rotation and shoulder rotation.

(8) Your back foot lifts off the ground instead of dragging.

(9) Your release point is in back of your front foot - it should be 8"-12" in front of your foot, knee, chest and chin which should all be aligned vertically at release.

(10) Your camera is tilted (in the side view).

Most of these items are all related. By dropping the glove and not delaying your shoulder rotation, you don’t give yourself time to track forward and get your release point out front and you don’t achieve your maximum velocity. By planting on a (mostly) straight front leg, you also prevent your body from tracking forward which, in turn, means you aren’t going to get your back foot to drag. The straight front leg creates a “cartwheel” effect - your body flexes at the hips, the torso leans forward and your back foot lifts off the groung. I’d want the torso to remain more upright at release so your shoulders rotate around an upright spine. When you track your upright spine forward, your back foot will drag. Although we want the back foot to drag, it is not the goal - do not try to make your back foot drag. Think of it more as the result of doing the other things correctly.

So, what to do? Where to start?

First, minimize or eliminate the side step at the start of the delivery and lock the eyes on the target. Start with the knees bent a bit more to reduce the dip. These things will keep the eyes more level and get more of your movement going horizontally toward the target instead of sideways and up and down. They are easy to do - you just have to remember to make yourself do them until they become habit.

Then, you need to try to do all of this:

  • try to plant on a more flexed (but firm) front knee
  • get the upper arms into an opposite and equal position at foot strike
  • leave the glove out front and bring the chest to it
  • delay shoulder rotation as long as you can while tracking forward

If you can do these things, you should find that you will have a little more velocity, your release point will be closer to home, the consistency of your release point will increase, you will put less stress on your arm because you’ll be using more of your body to throw.


#15

I see a couple of things…

  1. Like many pitchers with problems, your hips seem to turn pretty much at the same time as your shoulders. What you want is for your hips to rotate well before your shoulders like this picture of Casey Fossum…

  1. As with Roger, I’m not thrilled with your glove-side action; I don’t think it’s helping out your velocity. I would prefer that you pulled your glove into your glove-side pec rather than let it hang down by your side. At a minimum that would put you in a stronger defensive position.

  2. You might also want to point your glove to the 3B side of the target rather than directly at the target. This may help keep your shoulders closed rather than opening up so soon.


#16

I was lookin at it, maybe you need to be more out front?